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SHIPPING SUMMARY.

This summary deals with events to the 10th inst. inclusive, and is supplemented to .date in another part of this issue. A fair amount' of business has been transacted during the month, aud the incoming of the now season's grain is likely to be productive of a brisk trade for some time to come; while with the prospect of a speedy opening of the railway traffic between this port and the agricultural districts, we may anticipate an increased trade in the shipment of grain, both to the Home and intercolonial markets.

STATISTICAL, FOREIGN, v ETC.

. . Between - the coastal traffic, our usual intercolonial, trade, and the vessels which have arrived from Home and foreign ports during the'month, pur arrivals assnme a respectable number, no legs than 116 vessels of all classeß, averaging 20,053 tsns, having entered>in,|and 115 vt&ssls, with an aggreqat* of 21,041 t^ns, having cleared out. of the port during the period represented in this Buromary. The arrivals from England have been contihed to two" vessels, the Fernglen reaching us on February 18th, after a capital passage 0f.74 days: from London ; while the | ship Rayenacraig, from the same port, arrived on the psth February. These vessels, with the French barque Reno, from the Mauritius, constitute the inward home traffic for the month. • The departures for British.ports include the New Zealand Ship ping Company's clipper ship Otaki, Captain John Leslie's Calypso, and the Albion Shipping Company's Marlborough, all theee vssseJs leaving with: full'and valuable cargoes for" XondbD. ■•■' ' ■ - ' i

INTEKCOLOMAL.

This branch of pur.trade hag been fairly ,brißk, and bids fair to be so for some time to come." The traffic between Otago and Melbourne has teen well' maintained by the steamers 'tinder : Messrs M'Meekan, Blackwood,' Bnd Co's'flag,: comprising the Ara-; wata; .Ringarooooa, Tararua, and Alhambra, which have come and gone with unfailing regularity, The Sydney trade ha 3 been attended'tp by the Union, Coorpany's boats Wakatipu and Edtorua, -with Mr Fulton's. Easby. The " barque* Waratah and brig Clematis, represent the trade , with Hobort Town, while the German barque Pallas and the brig Drover have reached us from N°wcastle. ■■.''.'.'.

INTERCOASTAt TRADE.

The business with the ports of New Zealand both north and' south has 'aeen brisk, the steamera engaged in the trade being principally those of the Union S.S. Company, comprising the Hawea, Taupo, Taranaki, Wahaka, aad Taiaroa to the extreme north, while the s.s. Beautiful Star and Waitaki, with the p.s. Samson, have aa usual maintained a constant communication with the port 3of Oamaru and Timaru, the s a. Wanganui and Oreti being brisk'y employed in the trade hetweeri Dunedin and the Bluff, while't'.ie Star of the South and St. Kilda are engaged

in maintaining a steady communication with Warganui and the intermediate ports. Oar fleet of handy little coasters have been briskly working lietween thi3 and the small port's on the immediate seaboard, conveying grain to the ships ■ on. the loading berth for London; while a steady trade has been .maintained between this and the several timber ports of, the Colony. Nor must we omit mention of an enterprise which bids fair eventually to become remunerative to its spirited projectors, who have deserved well of the Colony for their efforts in en de'avouring to biing the resources of. the vasty deep into its ports, and thus render it on a par with the siater Colony of Tasmania —we refer to the whaling trade, and to the vessels of Messrs Cormaek, Elder, and Co. which are'engaged in that trade, and we are glad to be able to compliment those gentlemen on the success which has this seaaoD attended the whaler '■. Splendid, while the efforts of their people on the Macquarrie Islands have, we hear, been equally successful. ;

ARRIVALS.

The arrivals during the month may be summarised-as follows :—Home, 3 vessels, 2452^ tons j intercolonial, 8 vessels, 450S tons ; coastal, 105 vessels, -13,093 tons. Total, 116 vessels, 20,053 tons.

I>EPARTrjRES,

: The departures during the same period have been:—Home, 3 vessels, 3152 tons ; intercolonial, 13 vessels, 7156 tons; coastal, 96 vessels, 10,733 tons. Total, 115 vessels, 21,041 tons. ■ J

WEATHER,

The weather has been on the average unusually fine for thi3 season of-the year. The--wind has principally been from the N.E.,- varied with an occasional S.W. breeze, attended "by smart rain showers.

■ '■■'■ --■■-' STATISTICS. The vital statistics for the month show that 867 persons have arrived at, and 141 perons sailed from the port. Last month the arrivals were 840 persons, and departures 110.persons..... ,

.:-. r ... SHIPBUILDING, DOCKS, ETC. j! ; The several docks and slips, and the handi- a | craftsmen in connection with them, have w been ■ fairly patronised during the month, ™ ■while Messrs Davidson and Oo.'s last vessel, the stern-wheel steamer lona, has been <y handed over to her owners, and is plying on a the upper waters of the Molyneux, thus open- E ing up an increased traffic between that dis- a i trict and Dune.din, her cargoes being tran- o; shipped at Balclutha io the railway line for P transmission to the; commercial centre. a "ARRIVAL OP THE RENE. . F The French barque Ren 6, .from the Mauritius, was v signalled at the Heads on March 4th. The tug fi Kopntii, being in ...readiness, steamed down and 2 towed her up against a strong S.W; wind and ebb tide n to the anchorage off Carey Bay. at. 7 pm. The Reng o has made a pas'age of 40 days, and brings 10,586 C packages of sugar. She left tho Mauritius on January a 19th, had light S.E. winds to'latitude 28 S.. thence n :lightN. and N.E. winds. .Sighted the island of St. Panl's on February 6th, when she grot the westerlies; had light W. and S.W. winds wiih fine weather until sighting the Snares on the 24th ult. After passing the 1 Snares experienced M;rontf. N.W, winds with thick f dirty weather. Made the Nuggets on the morning of v the 3rd Inst, with a S.W. breeze, which freshened, and 2 she stood o3 the la.id until yesterday morning, and mode tho Heads at i p.m., towing up as above.; ? . TRIAL TRIP OF THE lONA. I The new stern wheel steamer lona made a very 8 satisfactory trip from Dunedin to Port Ohalmers on g March Ist, doing the run in fiO minutes from point to v point. She'leaves for Port Molyneux with tbe first ii slant of moderate weather, and is to be employed on t the lower waters' of the Clutha, taking cargo to and 1: from Balclutha in connection with the railway, a ser t vice for which from ■ her light draught of water i she is eminently Cited. The lona was built t by Messrs Davidson. and Co., of Dunedin, to the j order of the New Zealand Land Company and Mr' s -James Smith, of Greenfield Station, her joint owners, j aad is a rem«kaWe pretty little boat of the f kind. Her:.extreme length is 110 feet; breadth of t beam, 18 feet; and depth of hold 4 feet .6 inches. > £ She is fitted with a pair of new condensing engines of 50 horse-power, her two cylinders being each 15 inches t in diameter with a stroke of 3G inches. Her boilers' c are multituhular, and with her engines and hull are i the work of Messrs Davidson and Co. Captain Gordon j M'Kinnon, under whose sup rintendence she was on- i structed and:who takes command of htr, states the ', whole of her. machinery works beauti'uHy, and t!iat ■ i , she fully' answers his expectations. Her carrying i capacity is exireme'y good, and she will take 30 »ons of i cargo on a draught of 2ft 6in, while with CO tons j she only draws about 3ft 6in. and U therefore a most suitable vessel for the trade of the River Clv ha. We j wish Ca >tain M'Kinnon every success, and predict ( that the little lona will win many laurels in the tr/.de i she is about to enter. ■ i ARRIVAL OP THE RAVENSCRAIQ. 1 The arrival of the ship Kavenscraig, from London ' was telegraphed from the pilot station at the Heads ' on 25th February, and the tutr Koputai, which had ' taken. out the barque Sarah Bell, brought the ship ' into port, and left her safely anchored in the powdtr ground at 12.45 p.m. The Ravenscraig i3 a fine-looking : Iron Bhip of 12t>3 tons register, and is owned by Messrs : J. and O. Allan, of Glasgow, which firm are also '. owners of the Pomona, an old trader to this port. She ; comes into port in excellent tiiin, and reflects great credit on Capt. Biggam and h s officers, aud brings, in addition to 15 passengers, some 2000 tons of cirgo, 800 .tons of which is dead weight, and the re^t general goods. She has also 30 tons of powder atowed in a properly constructed magazine. The Raven^craig left Gravesend on December Ist, and anchored in the Downs on the same evening; left again next morning, and experienced light easterly winds down vhannel, taking her departure from Start Point'on the 4th of December ; experienced a strong westerly b reeze for the next twenty-four hon s, and thence W. and N.W. winds across the Bay of Biscay ; took tbe flrrt of the N.E. Trades in latitude 29 N ,on December 15th, -had them 1-ght, and finally lost them ia latitude.4 N. on December 24th; thence shs experienced light variable winds up to' the Equator, which she crossed on the 2Sth, in longitude ;6 W., took the S.E Trades on tho s&m-i d»y, and carried th^m" to latitude 20 S., lorgitude 29 W. On January the 6th, a light easterly breeze spra g up, and continued for four daya, giving out in latitude 3130 S., and on January the 10th she fell ii with a light northerly breeze, which gradually worked round to . N.W. and westerly. She sighted the Island of Tristan d'Acunha on Jacuary 13th, and crossed the meridian of Greenwich in latitude 40.30 S. on the 17th, rounded the Cape of Good Hope on the 21st in latitude 44 S., and thence experienced steady winds, principally from N. to VV.N.W;, right across the Southern Ocean, running down her easting between the parallels of 45 and 46 south latitude ; passed the meridian of Cape Leu win on the 12th instant, and the Island of Tasmania on the 19ch, and thence experienced westerly and N.W. winds up to the land. She passed the Snares on the morning of the 23rd instant without sighting them, and experienced a strong westerly gale, which died away to a calm oh the afternoon of the same day, aud continued so till tin afternoon of the 24th, when she made her first landfall to the westward of Nuggets Point: A fresh N.W. breeze then-sprang.up, which freshened to a gale, and suddenly-veered round to S.W., blowing with.great fury during the wh3 c of thp night. The gale moderated yesterday morning, and'she made the Heads at 10 a.m. The only casuilty which occurred during the voyage was the death, on December 4th, of Mr H. G. Merriman, aged 19, a cabin passenger. The cause of death is stated to have been infUmmation of the braia The only vessel bound to this Colony spoken by the Ravenscraig was the Sea Toiler, from London for Wellington, off Tristan d'Acunha. THE CRUISE OF THE SPLENDID. Messrs Cormaek, Elder, and Co.'.s whaler Splendid arrived at the Heads on February 23rd, sHer athr*e months' cruise off the Chatham Islands, and was towed up to the anchorage at 5 p.m. by the s.s. Jane. We heartily congratu'ate her owners, officers, and crew ou the success which has marked her cruiso, and trust that her future trips will be equally remunerative. She brings f nlly 55 tuns of sperm oil as the result of her labours, and w^uld have been a full ship had she not encountered very severe weather; indeed, a 10----tun wha'e was lost on the evening prior to her setting sail for headqmrtera. She will undergo an immediate refit, and sail 'as soon as possiblo for the cruising ground to the southward, where, if fish are to bo had, Captain Soule and his officers will render a "good. account of them. The Splendid left Port Chalmers on November sth. Kxperienced fresh westerly f>nd south-west winds, and made tho Chat'iam Islands on the 16th. Cruisod to the northward and eastward of the Ghathams, and sighted her first whale on the 16th November. Two

days »fforwards she lowered her boats, gave chass and took a 05-barrel fl.^n. After cruising about for.another weak, sho' captpried another whale on the 21th, which yielde-.l 75 barrels; and on Docember 5tU caught her third fiah, mnking from it another 100 barrels of oil. On the Oth ilie chased and took the fourth whalo,

which averasrod 00 barrels ; and on January 2ndkilled: a 100-barrelfiill; ihonceshecruisedabbutforninedavß, and m tliu 11th of January waß rewarded by the sixth whale, which gave 8 J barrels Twenty days eUpsed: before sho succeeded in capturing the seventh whale, which yle'dud 80 barrels. This fish was taken tinder e'reumstonces of no Hliuht danger and xcitement, for as the boat pulled-up alongside him for the purpose of allowing the officer in charge to throw a bomb lance at him, he divod under water, and oncominsrupngain oausht the boat's quaiter in'his jaws,'-.crushing it up' like-paper, arid taking th'o'after oaraman—'Lewis Hunter-under water, keeping him down ifor fully a minnte and a-half. The f.oor. fellow, who is iinablo to swim,' came up" again, and commenced paddling: with" his hands;' which

attracted, the .attention i.f the' other boats' crewH, who at once rescued him. Ho was taken onboard, andon being examined was found to be t-everely bruised from the left shoulder to the right hip,l the prints of the whale's teetTt .being plainly discerned.! We are glad to hear that tbe poor feUow has quite recovered his severe treatment. TneJaw of the monster, measuring over 17ft in length, h<u bee>> preserved, and as a proof of its combat iveness there,nre some five teeth on one side and two on the other destroyed! The last fish wan sighted on Febru iry 7th, and after a long chase killed. , Unfortunately, however, on ..getting alon^idfl the ship, the'.wh'aM (estimated at 10' tiisir) fouled her and parted.' Two boats were at <i cc sent away .in' : search ."of the: nwsiiMJ: prjzo, and after, pullimj about' frb'n 11 p.tn. to 1 a.m.: oii the Bth; they reluctantly 'returned to tbe vessel; a strong. N.E. gale petting- in, jittonded by thick rainy weatber all further, gearctr was abandoned, and on the following day Ciptain Soule determined to teturn to headquirters and refit. She experienced strong -W, and rt.W. winds till getting- within 150 miles of Cook Strait, and thence ]>T;E. winds and fine weather to arrival; '

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ODT18780313.2.11

Bibliographic details

Otago Daily Times, Otago Daily Times, Issue 5013, 13 March 1878

Word Count
2,463

SHIPPING SUMMARY. Otago Daily Times, Issue 5013, 13 March 1878

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