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THE Otago Daily Times. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 1874.

We were much struck by the able way in which, upon a late occasion, Mr Shaw spoke upon the paramount necessity of a certain spontaneity of action upon the part of those who were to be benefited by the establishment of a Working Men's Club. There can be no doubt that whether in. establishing a

club or agitating any social or political matter, the success or failure of the thing in hand may be prophesied with considerable success by one who observes the amount of spontaneous action stirred up by its presentation to the public. Which of us has not at some some time or other known the difficulty of helping a man who will not help himself? There are a certain number of feeble individuals in our midst who lie upon the hands of their friends like a dead weight. By slow degrees or swifily, according to the forbearance of their comrades and the measure of their own. sluggish incapacity, these loafers upon society tire out their most anxious assistants. Find them an occupation which would in the hands of anactivemanproduceanincome sufficient for their wants, and in a very few months they will come back grumbling because their meat was only provided for them, and not cooked, cut up, and put into . their mouths. The vital energy required to arrange their affairs successfully is wholly wanting in such fwlk, and they ultimately drift into drink, become loafers at the bar of some publican, loath to offend them by turning them out. Alcohol supplies for a few moments, at least, the stimulus

needed to excite their sluggish torpidity and make their wits blaze up to a level with that of their fellows. To alcohol they come ultimately, as certainly as a horse goes to grass, and then they become the beastly examples so much needed by Mr Fox and his friends, who point their morals by showing how drink has brought A, B, or C, to that condition, when it would be much truer to say that it was the torpid constitution of poor A which brought him to require drink.

The hordes of new arrivals who are afraid to quit the sheltering walls of the Immigration Barracks supply us with many examples of the same kind of thing. There is nothing of ihe indiarubber nature about them—no tendency, as soon as ever they are forced down, to rebound the higher in proportion to the violence of the blow. The former generation of colonists brought with them, in virtue of their very coming, a certain go-aheadcdness —a certain irrepressible spring, valuable everywhere, but essentially necessary in a new colonist. If the work for which they were best suited was slack, they set to at something else. If they were beaten at one point they soon made themselves felt at another. We say in virtue of their coming, because the spontaneous emigration of the individual guaranteed, as it were, the possession of a certain native vigour—a certain natural spirit of adventure, which served to nerve him against the dissuasion of his friends, and served him, still better, to falsify their dolorous predictions of his failure afterwards. We wish to draw the distinction plainly, because we are afraid that sufficient attention has not been given to the essentially different value to the Colony of an immigrant who dares 16,000 miles of travel to better himself, and he who passes over the same distance because an agent worries him with a free passage in one hand, and fantastic stories of gold and idleness in the other. No doubt, this is not the character of all agents' labours, nor is the result in every case the same. It may be roughly calculated, however, that, if the immigrant who makes a move at his own instance :is worth £200 to the Colony, the man' who makes it at the instigation of an agent—a capitation agent—and with the free passage bribe held out to him, is worth about £20. Sixty or seventy : families are residing still at the Bar- ; racks. If these men had the pluck of i the Adam's, Jones's, Moseley's, and so forth of old days, they would Ion"----since have pushed themselves into something—be living by this time in their own house, albeitawhare or a tent—and have invented some way of making an honest living for themselves out of the wants of their fellow-colonists. Nothing, be it a club, a school, or an income, will be created until there are at least two causes at work—a want, and a spirit of contrivance to obtain the want, We have already expressed our opinion that both these causes are at work to effect the matter which was being discussed by Mr Shaav. We wish that we could say as much regarding that other and greater matter now pressing upon public attention. It is much to be feared that there is a want of that spirit of adventure which is above all other things necessary to a true colonist in our recent importations. To prefer the Immigration Barracks and Government work to chancing something, attempting something, on their own account, is a sign of weakness, of which the men who made Otago what it is could never have been guilty. No matter whether we call it pluck and enterprise, or by the more learned name of spontaneity of action, we all know the difference. The want of it in a servant is an effectual bar to his becoming anything more than a mere hind; the want of it in a colonist prevents his ever doing the true work of a colonist. If the new comers have introduced much of the spirit, a want of which produces loafers after many failures, it wa3 a dark day for Otago when they came into it. We do not wish to judge fro hastily, but sometimes a straw shows the direction of the wind, and we must confess we do not like the fact of full-

grown men clinging to the Barracks Some have returned from Oamaru, some from Orepuki, again to loaf about town. Ib would pay the Province to give such fellows a free passage home again, aud we are glad to learn that Mr Allan has taken some steps iin this direction.

It would be well to excise with judicious hand the more helpless members of the nevv chum consignments. We do not.wish to condemn all for the, faults of some. There lias been already too much of this sort of thing. At thesame time it is painfully evident that unless something is done ere long we, shall have added a good many to the ali-eady long list of Mr Fox's foes, and have to pay no mete trifle for the in-. troduefcion of men not worth a rap, because they are entirely wanting in '- spontaneity of action."

A few weeks ago we published an article regretting that the taste for athletic exercises that existed a few years ago at home •and in the Colonies had, to a certain extent, died out, and at the same time we also advocated the establishment of a gymnasium in Dunedin. Physical exercise has always had its enthusiastic advocates at the Universities of Great Britain, and occasionally those who considered that it was carried to excess have sneeringly insinuated that the rowing men, cricketers, and other patrons of athletic sports, have not, as a class, distinguished themselves by their mental attainments. Such a charge, however, has never been proved, and it has almost become a truism to say that a well developed body is necessary to proper mental cultivation. But while fully recognising the necessity for athletic exercises, a large number of Oxford undergraduates lately came to the conclusion,1 at the suggestion of Mr Kuskin, that physical exercise should be taken in such, a manner as to be produ.tive of some profitable result, in addition to the mere development of the muscles, and. the preservation of bodily health. The result was the formation of an Oxford Navvy Club, the members of which set themselves to work at roadmaking upon a farm at a place called Hincksey. The Graphic publishes a very amusing illustration of the members of the Club at work, and the effect is heightened by the introduction of a group of " professional" navvies who appear stretched on the ground at their ease, smoking their pipes, and regarding the operations of the road making under-, graduates with, that critically contemptuous air, with .which professionals, as a rule, regard amateur efforts. The young fellows have been; subjected to a great deal of rustic jeering and chaff, but this they bear with the most imperturbable good humour. The movement does not appear to be a popular one at Oxford, and has of course been | laughed at. The amateur navvies -do-not-work particularly hard, but there is.not jat present any fear of the Club being/ j broken up, and the Graphic looks forward: [to the time when inter-University contests in road-making and other utilitarian ! occupations, corresponding to the boat races and billiard tournaments we now have, may become the order of the day. We should not be at all surprised to see this desire to combine necessary physical exercise with the performance of really useful work, gain ground, although, of course, there will be many difficulties in the way. The real work-man—-the horny-handed gentleman—will no doubt consider that he is being wronged, and there will also probably be some difficulty in finding suitable work for amateur navvy clubs to do. A writer in the Napier Telegraph, who advocates tne formation of a similar Club, looks at. the matter from a very practical point of view, and says : —" The digging-up of the Botanical Gardens, the reclaiming the swamps, the making^and metalling Carlyle and other streets, whilst some, of a more mechanical turn, might be sinking artesian wells, or do amateur carpentering, in cottage baildirg, «&c.— surely these are laudable objects, :and effect the avowed result. I am aware these suggestions only apply to the sum mer months; Whether a large enclosed building lighted with gas, cnmfortablj warmed, and furnished with every gymnastic appliance, would rival the attractions of the billiard and card tables, I do not know. I prophesy great outlay, expensive keeping up, with no proportionate patronage." This writer also proposes that a smithy, carpenters and joiners' shops, should be provided for the use of amateur workmen. We do not suppose that the example of the Oxford undergraduates will set our young men. at work at once iv the making of roads and the' improvement of our places of recreation in Dunedin, but there is something sensible in the idea that is well worthy of consideration. It is somewhat strange that amongst young men here and at home, hard and unproductive work, only useful in developing the muscles and promoting bodily health, should have been so popular, while it has been discovered .by. experience in our j.enai establishments, that while the prisoners would willingly pcr r f orinusfcf vi work, labour of an unproductive kind—such as the fatiguing shot drillshould have been looked upon as oae. of the greatest punishments. While we are doubtful whether the example set. by Oxford ''navvies" will spread, still, regarding it in the light of a protest against the senseless character of many of the amusements in which young men now-a--days engage, it is a hopeful sign of the I times.

We have authority for stating that it is the intention of the Government to take immediate steps to re-establish the San Francisco Mail Service. With this end in view Mr Thomas Russell will shortly visit Sydney on behalf of the New Zealand Government. Whether a temporary service in conjunction with New South Wales be arranged or not we believe thai Mr Russell will thereafter proceed to England to make arrangements for a permanent service.

The General Assembly was prorogued at half-past two o'clock yesterday afternoon by His Excellency the Governor. A report of the proceedings, transmitted by telegraph, will be found elsewhere. ■ • ■

We are informed that the feeling among the Volunteer throughout the country is not to go to expense, " because they feel the 3word of Damocles is hanging over the head of their existence as Volunteers." Their existence beiug prolonged by, as it were, an act of grace from year to year, and not knowing how soon they may be "knocked on the head," they will not go to expense in the way of rifle ranges or uniforms, and they lose all interest; in volunteering. Our informant thinks if there were certainty, in terest in volunteering would revive; but now matters drag on in a dull, spiritless way, disheartening to Volunteers, and unsatisfactory to tax-payers.

A serious accident happened on the Anderson's Bay road yesterday morning. Mr and Mrs Welborn, settlers, of Portobello, were coming into town in a spring cart when their horse was caused to bolt by a man cracking a stockwhip. The cart was upset and iis occupants thrown out, the horse being so injured a3 to be rendered useless. Mrs Welborn was picked up insensible. She had been very much cut about the head; and her husband had his hand and arm injured. A large number of eggs that were in the cart were destroyed. We are informed that the man who craoke 1 the whip—a blacksmith —offered Mr Welborn £2 as compensation.

Our attention has been called to the con ducb of the boys of the Caledonian Society's classes at the Athenaeum. The noise they

make is disgraceful. They run up and down stairs disturbing readers, and giving vent to sounds more like the yella of the Yahoos described by Swift, than what might be expected to come from a civilised being. It is impossible for ladies and gentlemen attending the Athenaeum to read in comfort owing to the discreditable exhibition which these boys, or rather young men, make of themselves. No one seems to have any control over them, and the Librarian puts himself to much trouble in the vain endeavour to preserve quiet. We have been informed that strong representations on the matter have been made to the Committee, aud we are aware that the matter has been brought for • ward in Committee, and steps resolved to be taken for its prevention. The nuisance, however, still exists. We have spoken very strongly, but no more than is deserved. It is a very bad sign to see such conduct on the part of youths who ought to know better, and who have, through the praiseworthy liberality of the Caledonian Society, advantages possessed by few lads who have to work during the day. Such displays of larrikinism are a poor return for the labour shown on behalf of these lads. We hope in future strict steps will he taken to see that these lads enter • and leave the building quietly, and that those who create a disturbance be expelled from the classes.

Fresh tenders are called for additions to the school at Caversham.

The single women and nominated immigrants by the Otago were removed to the Barracks at Caversham yesterday. The remainder ot the Otago's passengers will be brought to town on Friday. The married and single men, ex Corona, will be brought to town on Wednesday. It will be seen by notification elsewhere that immigrants by the Corona will be open for engagement at the Immigration Depot, Caversham, to-day and on following days.

The case of the two seamen, who, irresistibly influenced by the stirring doings on the Victorian goldfields in the memorable year 1852, deserted from their ship in Hob. son's Bay by paddling ashore on one of the main hatches, was almost paralleled in this harbour on Saturday night last. A similarly strong inducement to desert was, however, wanting ; and yet, lured, we imagine, by the verdant appearance of Port Chalmers hills, two of the Corona's men bade adieu to their floating home, and gained the shore on one of theship'sladders. The Corona was lying at the Quarantine Ground, so the men had a pretty wide stretch of water to cross before they reached terra firma. Remarked one of the officers, moie in sorrow than in anger— "Why did they not wait until the ship was moored at the wharf * " Whilst upon the subject of desertion, we may observe that the whole of the Mairi Bhan's crew left their ship on Saturday night. The Captain was naturally surprised, as he had no reason to entertain the slightest suspicion of a levanting desire on the part of his errant sailors. They had been very liberally dealt by—in proof whereof, they left very little due wages behind them.

Messrs Guthrie and Laraach's temporary premises will be completed in about a fortnight, by which time the immense quantity of d&ris from the recent fire will no doubt be removed. The firm's new brick stables are receiving the finishing touches, and reflect the highest credit upon all concerned. Accommodation has been provided for about two dozen horses, and every convenience will no doubt be supplied.

The vital statistics for the month of August, just ended, were: Births, 122; marriages, 32; deaths, 41.

His Honour Judge Bathgate inaugurated the Dunedin District Court yesterday, enrobed in all the habiliments of his office; and the members of the Bar, who were numerous, appeared similarly costumed in wigs and gowns, which formed the subject of some comments, as will be seen by our reDort elsewhere. The Court sab until five o'clock, and decided one case.

Mr Aldrich is about to enlarge his premises at the corner, of Princes and Dowling streets, by an extension two storeys high in Dowling street, in keeping with the part already erected. The lower part of the addition will be used^for the purposes of his own business, and the upper portion will be divided into offices.

Professor Milieu Coughtrey left for England by mail steamer yesterday. Professor Coughtrey goes home partly on University and partly on private business. He will be back in Dunedin in time to commence his classes for Anatomj' and Physiology at the opening in May next of the University for the coming year.

Our correspondent informs us by telegram from Queenstown last night that Mr Warden Beetham intends to resign his position, and to offer himself as a candidate for the representation of the Wakatip district in the House of Representatives at the next General Assembly.

A curious report was current at Port Ohafmers and Dunedin yesterday about a shooting case on bo.ird the ship Cathcart, which arrived at Lyttelton on Saturday. It is said that the crew mutinied, and that the Captain shot one man dead and wounded two others, the wounded men being landed at Lyttelton. We have received no telegrams to bear out the rumour.

The residents of the Forbury will soon have the satisfaction of seeing proper school accommodation for the numerous juvenile population of that rapidly rising district. Mr Hislop, Mr D. Ross, and some members of the School Committee visited the school ground on Thursday last, and fixed the site of the new school building. Work has since been commenced. The agreement provides that the building be completed and ready for occupation on the 31st October. The present school building consists of only one room> and is in no way equal to the school requirements of ttie district.

. The usual fortnightly meeting of the Mornington Mutual Improvement Society was held in the District Hall last evening, when a very enjoyable evening was passed, notwithstanding the fact that the gentleman who was to continue the subject of "Primeval man," did not put in an appearance. One of the members related his experiences of travelling and Otago roads in the early days, causing much amusement by relating the incident of a man having been seen going about poking in the mud v ith a long pole; and on being asked what he was looking for, replied that he had lost a dray and team of horses there the previous night. This, together with other adventure* on the " Devil's backbone," caused those present to make the room resound with hearty and long-continued laughter; The single women immigrants who arrived per ship Otago, were iauded yesterday by the steamer Golden Age, and sent to the Caversham Barracks. A few of the married people accompanied them—about 80 souls all told. The remainder of the immigrants are to be landed to-morrow.

St. Thomas's Church, now in course of construction at the corner of Stafford and Hope streets, will be completed and ready for use about four weeks hence. This will afford accommodation to a large number if persons who seldom or never attend church services in consequence of being unable to obtain sittings. Considering the large influx of population pourtd into the Province, the various denominations will require to bestir themselves to treat more commodious buildings if they wish their adhctcuts who arrive from Britain and other places to take part in

their services. St. Paul's Church was recently to have been enlarged, and tenders were called for the purpose, but the lowest amount exceeded the estimate of the Vestry by £700, and consequently the matter was ordered to stand; over for an indefinite period. There being only one general entrance to this Church, considerable inconvenierce is experiencedl by those leaving the building afc the conclusion of the services when it has been crowded. The new Knox Church, which promises- to become one of the handsomest in the Colony,, appears to be but slowly proceeded with. At St. Joseph's Church there is not sufficient sitting room for the regular attendants, and consequently it becomes .rather unpleasant when they are so closely packed together: Indeed it affords a matter for astonishment to see suehlarge numbers leaving the comparatively small Church every Sunday.

The Parsee, which sailed from Glasgow on the 11th June for Porfc Chalmers, has" on board immigrants equal to 312£ statute adults. The list of immigrants, according to their several occupations, is as follows z— Farm labourers, 22 ; ploughmen, 15 ; general aud domestic servants, 47 ; nurse, I- r labourers, 12; miners, 12; joiners, 5 ; blacksmiths, 8; shoemakers, 4; bakers, 4; masons, 4; stone cutters, 3; engine drivers, 2; engine men, 2 ; engine fireman, 1 ; railway labourer, 1; hammer men, 2; cabinetmaker, 1 ; slater, 1 ; painter, 1 ; plasterer, 1 ; tailor, 1; dressmaker, 1 ; plumber, 1'; housekeepers, 2; machinist, 1 ; shepherd, 1 ; calenderer, 1; moulder, 1 ; fish curer, 1; farm servant and fiesher, 1; farm servant and miller, 1 ; brickmaker, 1 ; dyer and labourer, 1; shepherd and butcher, I; holJowware moulders, 2 ; farm servant (female), 1. Of these immigrants, 24 have been got through the Agent-General, and 288^ through the Otago Home Agency.

The evening service at the Holy Trinity Church, Port Chalmers, on Sunday last, partook of an eleemosynary character. It had been announced on the previous Sabbath that the unhappy case of the Osborne family would receive special consideration, and it ia gratifying to know that this further call upon the charity of the congregation met with ready response. The attendance was large, and an expressive and touching dis course upon the uncertainty of life and the obligations of mankind to minister to the need of the widow and the fatherless, was delivered by the Rev. Mr Leeson. The offertory was devoted to the Osborne Relief Fund, and amounted to between £7 and £8.

Mr and Mrs Sullivan, two of the lately arrived immigrants per ship Corona, have made early acquaintance with a Colonial Police Court. They came on shore on Saturday, and, to use a phrase we heard applied naively by a witness in a former case to describe liquoring up, they " partook of too many glasses of refreshment," and were quite overcome. Tke man was worse than the woman, but as she persisted in following her : better half to the lock-up, and made the afternoon hideous with her howling, the police very considerately permitted her to cast her lot in with his, and so they reposed together until dealt with in the usual manner yesterday at the Port Chalmers Police Court. The man was fined ss, or in default 24 hours' imprisonment. The woman was discharged with a caution.

The following are the presentations to the Museum during the month of August:— A Maori flax-beater, Mr C. N. Bell, 0.E.; a large trout, W. A. Young ; a tree lizard,; Mr 6. Brooke; a spotted seal, the Captain of the schooner Wanganui ; a ferret, Mr Harper ; crystal of hornblende, Mr Colin M'lntyre • a shoveller duck, Mr A. Kimbell; a sparrow hawk, Mr E. Amyes, Palmerston; Native cloth, from New Caledonia, Mr A. Begg ; Maori stone adze, Mr Hislop ; aglasstish, Mr Parry ; king crab and shells, Captain Le Maistre; glassrope sponge, Dr W. Brown; two sea-hares, Dr Cowie j Glasgow Chronicle, November 19th, 1811, Mr J. Barr; fossils from Caversham, Miss Jane Collins; nickel ore, New Caledonia, Mr A. Begg; fossls from Eiverton and Orepiiki, Mr J. W. Afathews; fossils from Kakanui, Mr Ashcroft; blackbird's nest 2nd egg, Mr VV. Stevens; a stick-insect, Mr Vincent Pyke; a platypus, Captain G. Harrison, schooner Hally Barley ; two teeth of sperm whale, Captain G. Harrison; four shags, Rev. T. L. Stanley.

The commencement has just been made of the erection of additional premises for Messrs Fergusson and Mitchell. The'buildings are being erected en the piece of ground in a right-of-way off Princes street, formerly occupied by the London Portriit Booms, and almost immediately opposite the firm's place of business. The structure will take up the whole of thj remaining part- of the section unbuilt on, being a width of 21 feet by a depth cf 109 feet, and will be four storeys high. Mr Lawson is the architect.

The attention of shareholders in the National Fire and Marine Insurance Company is called to an advertisement in another column, giving notice of adjournment to to day of the extraordinary general aeeting called for yesterday.

Mr P. Lewis is about to erect two-storey business premises adjoining the Temperance Hail, Moray Place. The building will cover a space having a frontage of 38ft. 6in., by a depth of 50ft. Mr Lewis intends to carry on a wholesale wine and spirit business on the street floor, and the upper floor will be set apart for offices. The building will have a neat front in the Italian style. Mr Sanders is the architect.

The talented author of the "Ingoldsby Legends " gives in one of them an amusing description of a certain feasb at which St. D^nstan played a prominent part. We were reminded of this by the account we received of what Jack, in the innocence of his heart would, we dare say, term a "flare up? on board the ship Hindostan, on Saturday night. A grand spread was prepared in the foiecastle, and to it all and sundry were invited, invitations absolutely being issued to gentlemen of the cloth on board other ships. The feast is said to have been of the most recherche description; nothing, in fact, was omitted that could be supplied from that oila podrida—a ship's store room. Even tobacco was provided, and, as somebody who happened to view the scene remarked, "it was kicking about like ballast." The idea of the feast originated in the confused notions entertained by the crew on the question of meuia and tuum. They, in fact, drew upon the ship's account, levying tribute on the lazarette where the scores were kept. It appears that "afcer dark" an entrance to this repository of good things was effected, and a regular carouse ensued, and was extended far into Sunday morning. Then attention was directed to the little game, and the police were called in and arrested three of the men, two of them being visitors, whilst one belonged to the ship. They were duly anaigned at the Poiice Court yesterday morning before two justices of the peace, Dr O'Donoghue and Mr Taylor, and their cases ran as follows :—John Weldon alias Smith and John Dickson were charged on the information of Captain White with being illegally on board the Hindo stan. rlhe evidence adduced sheeted home the charge conclusively, and the delinquents were each sentenced to one day's imprisonment with hard labour, iiobert May, a seaman belonging to the ship, was tliaa charged with embezzling stores from the lazaretto. He alao w&s found guilty and was sentenced to be cast iijto gaol and made useful for the term of three months. Gapt.

White, of the Hindostan, appears to have had a great deal of trouble with his men« First and last they proved an unruly lot. There are now only some two or three of the original crew left on board.

The New Zealand Government Gazette of the 20th August contains a proclamation of a rjuarantine ground at the B?aff Harbour, situated in the Campbelltowß Hundred.

We learn from the New Zealand Times that Mr J. E. Dennisfcon, who lately passed in Dunedin as a barrister and solicitor of the Supreme Court, has entered into partnership with Mr Hutcheson, of Wanganui. Mr Hugh J. Finn, who passed as a baraster and solicitor here the other day, is about to-com-mence business in Queenstown.

A London telegram, dated 6th Atsgust, and published in the Argus, says: The Benchers of Gray's Inn have disbenched I)r Kenealey, the defendant's counsel in'the Tichborne-Orton case, for libellous articles published in his newspaper, the Englishman.

" On Saturday night," remarks the Auckland Star of the 24th August, " the streets' of Auckland were enlivened by one of those popular demonstrations which not unusually mark strong political indignation. At the close of the public meeting on Thursday night it became known that in was intended to burn in effigy the Premier of New Zealand, and several of the supporters of his resolutions for aggrandising the South Islaud by the subjection and spoliation of the Worth." The Star, which appeared to strongly favour the senseless proceedings, devoted about a column of its space to an account of them. From, this account it appears that Mr Vogel, Mr Reader Wood, Mr Buckland, Mr Creighton, Mr Luckie, were burned in effigy. The crowd dispersed "with three ringing cheers for Mr O'Rorke, and three for the Evening Star."

Mr John P. Armstrong, will deliver bis popular lecture, "An Irish Pilgrims Progress through America and Australia," at the Masonic Hall this evening. The object of the lecture is to swell the funds of that deserving project the Sailors' Home. Mr Armstrong has on former occasions given this lecture up-country in aid of charitable institutions, and our country contemporaries in describing it have been high in their praise. We believe something good may be expected to-night, and on that account, and taking into consideration the reason why the lecture is given, we hope Mr Armstrong will have the pleasure of speaking to a crowded house.

The annual general meeting of the Dune-' din Golf Club will be held at Wain's Hotel this evening.

The quarterly general meeting of the Otago Licensed Victuallers' Association will take place this evening at half-past 7 o'clock in the Fire Brigade Rooms. The female immigrants per Corona may be engaged at the Immigration Depfifc, Caversham, to-day at 10 o'clock. The extraordinary general meeting of the National Insurance Company will be held this afternoon at 2 o'clock.

The usual monthly meeting of the Third New Zealand Building and. Mutual Investment Society will be held at 7 o'clock this

evening.

Entries for the various events in the Dnnedin Canary and Poaltry Association's programme will close this evening, at the Bull and Mouth Hotel. '

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Bibliographic details

THE Otago Daily Times. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 1874., Otago Daily Times, Issue 3913, 1 September 1874

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THE Otago Daily Times. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 1874. Otago Daily Times, Issue 3913, 1 September 1874

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