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THE Otago Daily Times. "Inveniam viam out Faciam." DUNEDIN, MONDAY, APRIL 13.

In consequence of a letter addressed by Mr Siac to the Charabor of Commerce, tho Committeo of that body waited ou the Suporintendont, to nrge him to remit all charges on Whaling Vessels visiting the Port. A favorablo answer to tho application waa made, and we may expect that, as far aa it rests within the power of the Provincial Government, all Port charges on whalers will in future be remitted. But is this enough ? It does not seem an act of special grace to excuse Whaling Vessels from Port charges, for, under present circumstances, as long as thoy are not fitted out from the Port, they would come rather in the character of vessels in distress seeking to refit, than as ordinary traders. Could not a larger inducement be ottered than a more remission of tho charges, and would it be advisable to do so ? These are questions of much importance, and well worthy the attention of the Provincial Council. The Argm lately has drawn urgent attention to the way in which tho Victorians neglect tho fisheries of tho' Southern seas, and to their " allowing tho Australian whaling trade " to concentrate itself at Hobart Town." Our contemporary insists that there should be a thorough " exploration of " the extreme Southern Ocean." "Wo " want to know," he sayß, " what lies " under sea between us and the Antarctic " Continent;" and ho institutes a comparison between the enterprise of the Californians and Victorians. It appears that during the last six years deep sea fishing has become an established indiistry with the Californiana. There aro now nineteen vessels engaged in cod fishing, at distances from San Francisco, varying from 3000 to GOOO miles ; and last year they brought back to that Port 1183 tons of tho dried fish. But besides this, thero are twenty-two whaling vessels in tho North Pacific, sailing out of San Francisco, seven of which are owned and manned in that city. The Aryua complains of the neglect of both tho cod and whale fisheries.

Tho complaint of tho neglect of the Southern Whtilo Fishery comes also from other quarters. Great Britain haa almost entirely abandoned it, and tho Americans do not pursue it to anything liko tho extent they did formerly. It does not appear that tho falling oil is in consequence of tho want of fish. Experience has proved that continued fishing in any locality leads to the whale abandoning it for a timo fot another place. Hence, in the Northern Seaa, the fishing grounds have, from timo to time, been much varied. There is a marked difference 'between the whales of the Arctic and Antartcic Zones, ,ao that there iB good reason to believe that the fish of each hemisphere- are only to a limited extent migratory. The Southern Whale Fishery haa never fceeu very extensively prosecuted. It cannot have

had tho effect of destroying iho breed even iapart; all that it can have dono is to drive tho whale away from the more 'frequented, posta—notably, for instance, from off tho Coasts of New Zealand and Eastern Australia. Bat tho whales still roam the Southern Seas as plentifully, perhaps—from the .comparative aVsence from disturbance—more plentifully than over, although it may bo necessary to go further south in search of them. .

Tho largo supply of kerosene, it might bo thought, would havo lowered th-;. value of fish oil; but, wo believe, this ia not tho case: on the contrary, if we arcs not misinformed, fish oil lino rather shown a tendency to me. The price is certainly higher than it was in 1853, as shown by a price list which, we havo before us. Practically, too, tho demand always continues steady, and there is no danger of the oil becoming unsaleable. It enters into many uses beyond it« old one, for lighting purposcF. In Dundee' alone, 2000 tons of whale and seal oil are used annually, for the preparation of j'ife, a fibre tho use of which, wo believe, is increasing. But even supposing there were less inducement to obtain the oil than formerly, this is more than counterbalanced by tho improved fishing appliances modem science has supplied. Tho uao of auxiliary steamers has opened qtiito a notv era to the whaler. Not only aro the dangers less, but the steamers enn penetrate where sailing vessels cannot, and tho facility with which they caii pass between tho porta they frequent, and tho . fiahinj ground, enables them to make two voyages to their former one. When it is considered that, in the old times, when the Southern Whale Fishery was most active —say, the end of tho last century—the whuling vessels had to go all tho way Home to England or America to discharge cargo, and an absence of from eighteen months to three years was not out of the common ; and that now, with tho facilities which slapping offers, the oil can be unloaded at a port contiguous to tho fishing ground, and be despatched by another vesse! to an American or English market, it will bo seen under what enormous advantages, as compared with those ot olden times, the Southern Fisheries can be prosecuted. A steam whaler from Otago, for instance, should I c able to make two or three whaling and sealing voyages annually. We will return to the subject again, with tho viewto consider many points to which we have at present only referred. The importance to the Province and the Colony of Deep Sea Fishing, not only as a commercial occupation, but as a school for providing the information and the training essentially useful to a maritime people, is well worthy of consideration. So also the Co-operative System, winch tho Americans adopt, .and which is indeed but a reproduction of the old system undor which the Dutch followed the pursuit. There is much moro to bo said also concerning' the advantage steam whalers possess, and the great field for exploration which lies open to the Southern Whaler. To-day being Baiter Monday, two steamboat trips are announced. The Wallace is to make an excursion as far round the coast ;as the Ocean Beach (lauding passengers at I tho Heads, if possible) ; and the Peninsula will go to Poi iobcllo, which is becoming a very favorite place for pic-nic parties Yaoxhall Gardens are to be open "at nrllion prices," and " The Varieties Troupe,' and M. Fleury's Hand, are announced as the attractions.—For the evening, there are at least throe entertainments—Tho Princess Theatre; Mrs Heir's Headings at the Polytechnic ; and the Popular Concert at St. George's HalL The ninth of the series of popular concerts takes place this evening, at St. George's H*l'.. The programme includes instru- ; mental and vocal selections, from old and modern masturs, and gives promise of a very pleasing concei c. The half-yearly competition for the Silv« r Challenge Cup of the Dunedin Volunteer Artillery corps, took place at the Kaikorai butts last week. The conditions arc, that two competitions take place every year until tho Cup has been won three times by the same member of the corps, when it is to become his property. The ranges are—2oo, 500, and GO'J yards ; seven shots at each ; standing at 200 yards, and any position at tho other ranges ; Wimbledon targets atd Government rifles. Tho following are the scores :— 200 500 600 Tl. Capt. M'Farland 23 21 17-01 Gunuor Hardy 19 21 20—60 Corporal Ogttvio 10 21 17—57 Gunucr Chuholm 21 2i 15—57 Sergt. Muir 1G 20 15—51 Gunner Hislop 18 2."i 9—50 „ Cato 20 Jl 17—48 „ Pull J.I 17 15— 43 „ Brown 19 15 9—45 The shooting off for possession of tho Cup for the ensuing six months, between Capt. M'Farland and CorpL Ogilvie, tho present holder, is to take plies this morning. At Ilokitika, en the 7th instant, the returns of the polling for the election of a member for Weatland (South) showed—For Button, 330 j for Barfl, 289. Keturns had to come from Okarita, Itutherglen, and Maori Gully. It was generally thought that Mr Button would bo tho successful candidate.

Tho resignation of Mr Moorhouse, as Superintendent o£. Canterbury, is: thus referred to in tho Canterbury Times, j— "Tho most prominent event of tho -week, so far. as this Province iv concerned, is the reaignation of Mr Moorhousc. In a Message to tha Provincial Conncil, oa Tuesday evening, Hfaf Honor announced Ms intention of resigning, owing to the pressure of private affair*. Mr Moorhoaae Tipaa elected at a time when the Province, from the force ofciiorowtwaces,

was terribly depressed. Ho w»s ek'cled, by a very largo majority, nndcr tho belief that if any man could restore o\.'r prosperity bo wan more likely to succeed than any other. But disaster after disaster followed, and the current of events was too strong even for Mr Moorhouse. Though, ha retires from office without having accomplished what was expected of Mm, he retains the well-earned confidence and respect of al* who judge fairly of the evil times on which we have fallen. Canterbury baa had no public servant more devoted to her interests, more willing to spend and bo spent in htr service. A successor to Mr Moorbouse has been alieady found. Almost as soon an the resign-tion was made public, a requisition to Mr O. 0. Bowea, Kcaidcnt Magistrate, was set on fto*. Judging from tho unanimity with which it has been sigacd, and f-om the high place which Mr Bowcn holds in the estimation of tho public, his election will give univi real satisfaction. Wo are in a position to otato that Mr Bowen has consented to allow himself to bo pat in nomina-

" Rob Eoy " was the play produced at the Princess Theatre, on Saturday evening. It was played during Miss Bow ring's former engagement at tho Princess's, but with a "cast" considerably inferior to that on the occasion of its recent performance when Miss Gassy Matthews took the paifc of Helen Macgregor. On th'S oceatiou the "cast" was further improved; the play was altogether performed under considerable advantigCß, and it was consequently more a success than a drama equally familiar often happens to be. The prime advantage undor which it was nUycd, apart from Miss Bowring's taking tho part of Helen Maegrcgor, was tho appearance of Misa Harriett Gordon as Francis Osbaloistone " Hob Roy" is diitinctively an operatic drama, and the maintenance of its character, as such, was in good h.ands when in the hands of Miss Gordon. She sang exquisitely the airs incidental to the play, in the duets with Mii?B Jenny Kye as Diana Vernon, and in tho choruses wliich wero Bung pleasantly enough by the company. Otherwise, Misa Gordun was decidedly more the conventionol Francis Oabaldistone than have been some of tlie gentlemen players of the same part. Mr Kcogh again took the part of the Bailici and, despite his monotone, ho played the part very fairly. Mr Wilmot was the Dougal Creature, and, although physically rather a well-favored specimen of a Highland gillip, he was, artistically, all that was required. The acting of all the others was satisfactory, and the represent*, tive of Saundcrs Wylie, who haa not more than a few minutes to be upon the stage, spoko his few words with such a smack of tho Scotch as to receive one especial round of applause. At the conclusion, Miss Gordon, Miss Bowring, and Mr Steelo were called. The performance concluded with the farce, " Sarah's Young Man," in which Mr Wilmot, as usual, was most amusing. This evening, tho play of "Love's Sacrifice," and the extravaganza of " Midas,'' are to be performed.

Tha first of eight Dr.un.itic Readings and Recitals, by Mra Robert Heir, was given on Saturday evening, in the Polytechnic Hall, High street. The Hall has been improved ao far as the arrangements connected with the small stage are concerned ; and some excellent scenes have been painted : bat it was a pity that Home old, or withered, fern and cabbage tree decorations of the Hall were not removed before the evening of Saturday. The audience was a small one. We admit that such an entertainment as that given on Saturday ought to have attracted a crowded house ; but we did not expect that such would bo the result. Wo hope, however, that Mrs Heir may make the proposed seres of Headings a pecuniary success ; and she was certainly very succesaful in pleasing her first audience. At the outset, on Satur. day evening, Mrs Heir suffered from a very perceptible hoarseness or huskiness, but it was overcome before the end of the first paifc. Mra Heir reads well, but, she recites very much better than she readß. Where, not using a book, she recited, or acted, as in the poison scene, from 1" Homeo and Juliet," she was finely effective. The terrible scene mentioned has not, we feel sure, been before given in New Zealand with anything like the trngic intensity with which Mrs Heir invested it on Saturday. In Edgar Poo's, "The Bella ;" which was essentially a recital, Mra Heir's voice was exquisitely attuned to the uiolody of the rhythm and to tho varying but always deep pathos of tho poem. " The Execution," by Durham, with ita mixture of the horrible, tho grotcHqoo, and the merely comic, was a good sample of Mra Heir's abilities in reading tho class of composition with, which the " JugoMeby Legends" abound ; and " The Jackdaw of Kheima" wa3 better read than was " The Little Vulgar Boy." Duma's " Epittie to a Young Friend," and Tennyson's '" Lady Clara Vote do Vero," had their effect lessened by tho reader's hoarseness. Two selections from Shaksptre wf-re given, Mrs Heir being assisted by a gentleman amateur. In tho fourth act of "Tho Merchant of Venice," the pait of Portia was read unevenly, owing perhaps, to Mrs Heir having occasionally to take the parts of Bassanio or Gratiano ; but the great speech on Mercy was not allowed to suffer, but wa* excellently spoken. The second section was the Balcony Scene from "Romeo and Juliet,'* in which Mra Heir acted almost constantly, and made a beautifully impassioned Juliet. The gentleman amateur must be congratulated generally on doing well. Shy lock was evidently his favorite—at least, ho read the Jew better than he did the lovesick Borneo. One or two other pieces completed the programme.—For this eveiring, an " entire change" is announced ; and wa heartily hope that there may be good attendance.' We have nothing to do with, the question why Mrs Heir did not arrange to play at the Princess's, instead of to read and [ recite at tho Polytechnic; but we believe I that the public -would have "been better eatiaI fled had some other arrangement than the f prenent been made.

;An old officer In tho Civil Service— Cap» tain BoagTi, x>nr Collector j!»l Catrtoms— is aboot to ler.ve Nolaoa for Anckknl Cap-

tain Bough, at Kelson, saya the C'vlonkt, 13 to retire from tho Customs service, in consoquenco of suffering from debility and pain in the eyes; and ho goes to Auckland, in which , Province ho has come property on which he purposes to reside. Captain Rough is ono of tho oldest, if not tho oldett, civil servant in Now* Zealand, having been appointed harbormaster of Auckland bo long. .is twenty-eight years ag.o, at which time bo wen!; eloDg with, the officials to survey that harbor and lay out tho town. Mr David Jobiiston, Customs Collector at Greymouth, wiE succeed Captain Bough as Collector at Nelson.

The detachment of men sent to Hokitika by the steamer St. Kilda belongs to the Armed Constabulary, a force raised out of the old Defence Force, to take the place of regular troops in quelling native disturbances in the North Island. They are simply and inexpensively dressed in bluo uniform, almost destitute of ornament or even facings, and each man is armed with a Terry's breach-loading carbine and a revolver. Tho force she brings numbers 70 men, all told, and consists of three commissioned officers— Lieut Colonel M'Do-well, Capta"n (Inspector) Cummins, and Sub-Inspector M/Donnell (brother to the Colonel) —and G7 rank and file, including five Serjeants.

Tlio Southland papers report that, for several days past, these was experienced in th.it Province a continuance of heavy rains, wliich had filled every watercourse and drain to overflowing. Tho soil everywhere was thoroughly saturated. Inland communication was temporarily checked by tho swollen river a, and tho operations o£ harve&t had been for tho time suspended.

At a meeting of tho members of the Oamaru Branch Acclimatisation Society, held on Thursday, subscriptions amounting to upwardß of JL3I were handed in towards the fund being raised for tho purchase of English birds for the district.

A case of supposed wilful fire-raising took place at tho Waihola Gorge, between last Friday night and Saturday morning. Mr. Thomson, of Tokomairiro, purchased tho crops of Mr Gumming, Horse-shoe Bush, and stacked them near tho Watbobi Gor^e. The stacks were all safe on Friday night, until about four o'clock, when they wcro seen to be in a blaze ; and in tho morning they werj reduced to blackened ishes. No clue to the manner in which the fire originated has yet been discovered. The stacks were not insured.

Mr Maude, the Enumerator for Westland and Canterbury, furnishes the following census statistics ; —\Vct,tlaiul Boroughs, as previously stated, C 47.' 5; Wtßtland South, 0059. Total : Westland. Bouth of the Grey luvfcr, 15,5.")2. Tlie total population of iho Canterbury Province as now is .'jS,2(;O ; total of tlio Province as it would have been, had tho County of Westland not been declared, 53,792.

Up to tho 7th instant there was no dinturbance of the peace at Ilokitika. On that morning more than two thousand special constables mustered to receive final trders. They paraded in the Police .Reserve, and wore addressed by Messrs Bonar, FitzGerald, R.M., the Mayor, and Colonel Macdonncll. Tho sxjeciala wore dismissed from active service, but not discharged. They afterwards inarched through the town.

The charge against Crawley, of the Celt newspaper, Hokitika, has been dismissed, the evidence being inaufiicicnt. The following biographical scrap, with reference to Manning, the editor of the Celt, we take from the Melbourne Herald of 24th March : —'' The notorious Manning, the editor of the jVctc Zealand Celt, and the projector of the mock funeral, was recently a teacher in the Roman Catholic schools at Wangarattn and Tarrawingeo. Somo years ago he was a reporter on'the Ballnrut Times, and is believed to have been the writer of an article for which Mr Seekamp, the proprietor, was jsentneed to a long term of imprisonment. When the stockade was erected, Manning took an activo part in exciting the miners to resist the authorities, and his abject appeals for mercy when he was dragged out of his hiding place shortly after the capture of the stockade, will never be forgotten by those who heard them."

The polling for the election of a member to represent the Weatland Boroughs in the <»cueral Assembly h&H resulted in the election of Mr Harrison, Greymouth. The numbers announced at the close of the poil were as follow :• — Hokitika—Shaw, 80; Harrison, 9 Groymonth—Shaw, 1 ; Harrison, 89. Total—Harrison, OS; Shaw, 81. Majoiity for Harrison, 17.

On the Canterbury coast, says the Lyttdton Time*, there is likely to be greater activity in whaling during the coming season than there ban been for somo years past, aa we hear that Mr H. Buchanan, of ikolaki, intends to again start his fishery, and Mr J. Wright, of Island Bay, will also have hi« b iaw out- Wo wish both gentleman a suecubsful season.

We learn from tlio WcUinylon Imlcp- what of tbe 4th iaafc. that " tho Cadets have completed their firing to decide which of them shall represent the corps in competing for tire forthcoming Colonial Prizes. Tho highest scorea were Corporal Bowater, 20; Private BMmead, 29 ; and Private G. Grey, 27 ;—" out of ten shots, five at 100 and five at 150 yen's. In firing off tho tic at the longer range. Corporal Bowatcr scored a centre, agaiuat on outer from Private Bidinead, and will thus havo the honor oJ representing th<t Wellington Cadst Corpa"

"We learn," says tho HoxKlilxxnd Ntios, j "thit I. N. Watt, Esq., has been promoted to tlio office o£ Sheriff of Otago—a potsitw j far which bis loug and varied Colonial -experience peculiarly fits him. In his capa c jty of Kesident Magistrate and Native Prot ec tor at the Blnff, Mr Watt has gained *' a c resect and esteem of the pablio of tr ,is Province."

"Wo havo been informed that -at Palmerston, on Thursday last, a mixed, lot o f iqqq sheep, ewea and wefchera, *vaf , sold by auction, for 2a Cd a head.

Bishop Selwyn, at the :annoal meeting of theMancheßter AaxOiai^bf the Secietyfor tho Prop»igatioa of tb-a Gospel in Fonjiga

i Parts, referring to IV d'scMiragcmeut missionaries in the soutlK'ni hemisj,iu. re | marked:—" He had spokeu of the se«^* i failure of the work in New Zealand, p^ | had to tell them plainly one oi i( s ca , 1£ *C Tho people of tlio New Zealona race st«<j out for many year*, against the tejiipuiiets to intoxication. In the statistical statement published in the town of Wellington aai v years after the settlement awis fcr.ir.cd, aft| describing a number of convictions for variocg offences, including the offence of tlruukcc ness, there was a foot note addul, to t;.. effect that intoxicatiou was almost uijk&ow* among tho native people. He eon),) not s«y it was co now. But if t!ie iut' Y , people of New Zealand had w.v i , the sin of intoxication, from wlu-,m w uu ] t » God require an account of tlwir tin * j^ W4f . not a sin of native growth ; it was an jj,. ported, an exotic eiu. Tht-y i-toml againvt it for a time, but iw their faith faiKd, thu'v gave way to the temptations foicid ujxn them by their English Irethnn. Tlicy had. heard it said (and they wero fearful wonbl that it wjia the law of nature that the coloured races should uielfc away l.cfi.i-u t!;.> advance of civilisation. He would tel then; whore that law was registered, and w)■„ were ita agents. It was registered in H,.]| and its agents were tlioso whom Sat^n m:ul c twofold more tho children of Hill than Limself. Ho, from the bottom of hs K^rt urged them to do all they could to discountenance the use of spirituous liquors."

The Rev Mr M'Donoughhnßwiittcu to Ut Wf-tl Count Tin'?.* on the subject of the m-n----trovers}' now going on as to whether or nut he was in tho vanguard of tho Fenian procession at Hokitika. Ho writes :—" It is with surprise that 1 rend the extract from v,<. Weltinr/lon IndquiulfiiU, in which tiic writer endeavors to prove that I was in the vanguard of the procc-Bwn, ami rnd,e t<i the Cemetery with Messrs Clarke and Melody. . , . 1 presided at a meeting in H. Mary's Church ; it was publicly called, theTlmoi did not send a reporter, and cunttquently coidd not know what took place. How does the /uth'/u-iidait know what, I said ? From what source does it derive its information that 1 presided at a meeting which initiated an outrage of law ? Tim li)di']>ciulail does not even know the object of the meeting. Great limst be the fcurp'.isa of the Jwhpc.ndr.nl when he was iufornud that tho Hight Itov. Dr Viard's tile-gram had no iiifiuenco upon mo, nor <"tid it make any change in my line of conduct as rigaulß the procession. Although Ir< verence him as my Buperior, and endeavor to uphold the virtue of obedience, bond of union in the Catholic Church in the days of triumph as wc'l as ia those of sorrow. Although it may be to some a bad recommendation to say that 1 aui an Irishman, 1 ,i;n a priest, acd will ever, as on that occasion, know how to act in accordance w.th my dignity. I deny that I was in company with MesarH Clarke and Melody in the vanguard of the procession. Why 1 was present at the Cemetery may be answered to-morrow in Court, aa I sin a Crown witness.' Although. I have been disappointed in putting myself under the patronage of His Worship tliu> Mayor, I still claim a right to a portion </i the Cemetery which cannot be questioned hy tho Corporation, but, having instruction?! from the llight Rtv. Dr. Viard, 1 find it necessary to mention that he will not sanction tho erection of a cress in memory <f tho Irishmen who Buffered death at Manchester."

The steamer Albion, with upwards of hvo hundred passengers, from the West Coast, arrived at Sydney on the 2Gth tilt., where quite a sensation was created by the arrival of 80 many miners after the rcceut advim.it from Queensland. It is not improbable tbat amajority will at once return to Kuw Zealand., The Sydney Jlixuiny A'dr* of the 20th <ih. says :—" The eteainer Albion, from >Yw Zealand, presented a novel appearance an f-1.-o camo up tho harbor tin's morning withfcir decks peopled with passengers. Tlie Queensland gold mania appears to bo ranging with unaccountable vigor amonght the mining population of New Zealand, and they an: leaving by every possible opportunity. The Albion landed hero 238 miners, and it is probable they will return again to Now Zealand. Tho late unfavorable news from, Queensland will probably slop tho influx of immigration. We observe that tho st camera - from Maryh< rough are bringing back large numbers of disappointed and disgusted digger.s."

A man named John Steolo had committal suicide at Lccston, Canterbury. Steelty who was recently aa inmate of the Sunnyaide Lunatic Asylum, called on a miller in tho employ of Mr Hose, on Saturday last, and dined with him. Bo v/.is not bchi alive again. The body was found quite dcwl by Mr Rose, with the trigger of a gnu fast to Jiis foot, tho discharge having gone througit tho head. Dewascd had been in the employ of Mr Loc, aa barman, aiucc his discbarj/o f'om tho AsylTim.

The Wai G oani Thins reports tho followiug " ccurto ous amenitits'1 as having t?l:t« place bc-twf.en tho Jmlge :aid the Crown Prosecutoc, during one of the trials in tlio District O ourt at Hokitikaa few d.iyß ago •■- Hia How or : Ha%'e you any more »it«n■»» ** Mr O'JU nighliu ? The Crown Proiccutm : Yes, ye ,ur Honor. His Honor; Th.-n v!iy do yor t not call them? The Crown Prrnecutor : It ia not my duty to onlei tlio wiir.« « oat -of the box. Hia Honor : Yoii.-liavc Ltuii very impertinent several tim a. I aitviw; J' J' n(J?- to be so again. Tho Crown i'niMitf" r: Uo, your Honor, I have not. HisHu« jr: 'yon gave me the lie direct in «!>•'» Court yesterday, and I advise yn not to do Sl> a;:ain. Tho Crown Prosecutor: I di<l «<-*» your Honor. Ido not recoil'ct doirg *<*■ And 1. was only observing that it w-s "'!t my place to order the wituom to leave tije box, as tho Juiymigbt wi*h to jitt sou*.« questions to him."

By Auckland papers received by Ahuriri, we learn that His Excellency the Governor met an exceedingly loyal reccptwut and on stepping onahore.waß prcaei.tcil irita several addresses of welcome by the .Suptr/Btendent of the Province, and rcprtMintativ«» of all the local Bodies. Cf theso, pri**2* tho most interesting was o»o pr«Mjn*ed ty tho Natives, to which Ilia Excellency H** 1

a happy reply* Excellency bad held a fcjw, which was largely attended, and purposed visiting Sir George Grey at Kawau, whither the Hon. the Premier, Mr Stafford, had already gone.

In alluding to the commercial depression which exists throughout the Colony, the jfairif'n Il'iy Herald points out that with straightened means people must "become more economical.—" Ifc is really moDßtrous," aaya cur contemporary, "to think that more than two-tHrds of the customs revenue should be for duties on wines, spirits and tobacco— articles, the two first namedespecially, which arc nothing more than laxuricH, and the diiUtc of -which, opart from financial considerations, would he an inestimable boon to the Colony in a moral point of view. The quantity of these articles imported is something incredible—giving evidence of a specie? of infatuation on the part of tho colonists. Lot the leaders of society get the example of abstinence from those expensive, and, to Kay the least, unmeaning lnxuries ; and tho good that wi". romlt, economically and morally, will be beyond all calculation. Tho disnee of v.'incs and spirits, and the substitution of " home-brewed" would be an innovation, no doubt, but it would be a very healthful one. And it would have this good effect, too, that it would lead to moro money being available for other and more legitimate purposes ; and bettor st'M, would lead to the abolition of customs duties altogether. Direct taxation, such as would reach the army of absentee proprietors witL which New Zealand is cursed, is what this afllictcd country wants; and we are not sure ■whether, after all, it is not tho panacea for all the evils under which tho Colony groans."

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THE Otago Daily Times. "Inveniam viam out Faciam." DUNEDIN, MONDAY, APRIL 13., Otago Daily Times, Issue 1961, 13 April 1868

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THE Otago Daily Times. "Inveniam viam out Faciam." DUNEDIN, MONDAY, APRIL 13. Otago Daily Times, Issue 1961, 13 April 1868

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