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THE Otago Daily Times. "Inveniam viam out Faciam." DUNEDIN, TUESDAY, JULY 9.

The farmers of the neighboring Province of Canterbury, even to a greater extent than those of Otago, seem to experience difficulty, in disposing of their grain crops at anything like remunerative prices. Not only is the nominal price of grain in. Canterbury extremely low, but so great does ,the supply appear to exceed the demand, thai there can scarcely be said to be any available market at all for a large portion of that on hand. As uneces- " sity is the mother of invention," so the very strait to which our neighbors have been reduced seems likely to be productive of great and lasting benefit io the Province, by inciting them to a general and anxious inquiry respecting the best means of disposing of surplus produce. Foremost amongst those who have been deeply pondering the all-important question forced upon the consideration of the Canterbury settlers, stands Mr Moorhoiise, the Superintendent of the Province, who has recently addressed a very lengthy and highly suggestive letter on the subject to the President of the Canterbury Agricultural and. Pastoral Association. As the subject discussed by Mr Moprhouse in the letter referred to is one which also very intimately concerns the settlers of Otago, it may be profitable to glance at some of the matters adverted to by that gentleman.

Mr Moorhouse, in the first part of his letter, proves the absolute necessity which now exists for the farmers of Canterbury, and indeed of the Middle Island, seeking a market for their, surplus produce outside the Colony ; and he furnishes very conclusive, reasons for believing that the only steady and reliable market is the British Isles. He then points out that, independently of the question of the cost of production and attendant expenses, there are two conditions absolutely indispensable to success in that' market. These are, Ist, The production of an article of superior quality; and 2nd, The exercise, before shipment, of due precaution against damage during Ithe voyage to Britain. Under the former head, Mr Moorhouse tenders : to. the Canterbury farmers very sensible .advice on various matters relating to agricultural practice; such as the selection: of; proper seed, steeping it before .sowing, the preparation of the soil for the.. seed, ; arid the subsequent treatment of the crop. Although these topics ■relate to the most -rudimentary principles of agriculture, Mr Moorhouse seems to have thought it necessary to, direct the attention of the Canterbury farmers to them, and there ja reason to fear that some, at least, of the settlers of Otago, stand in need of similar advice' Mr Moorhouse might, perhaps, have gone a little further in this direction with: ad vantage to his constituents ; and pointed out to them the absolute necessity of more carefully securing their grain crops .against deterioration after. harvest, by properly stacking and thatching. . i

There is certainly much truth in Mr Moorhouse's statement, that owing to climatic causes the wheat crops of the Middle Island cannot be so speedily and so economically prepared for the market, or converted into flour, as in the Australian Colonies, but there can be as little doubt, that by careful selection of the seed, by judicious treatment of the land, and by attention and skill in securing and stackingthe crop, and in threshing out the grain when in proper condition, a sample of wheat could be produced of such quality as would command a ready sale in the English Market Even granting that, on account of a less favorable climate, the farmers of New Zealand should be unable to produce a sample of grain equal in all respects to that of Australia, yet taking into account the much larger return per acre secured by our, farmers year after year, there is every reason to believe that they could successfully compete in the article of" wheat with the Australian growers in any market in. the world, even though- the cost'of labor and atjfcendant expenses should be gomew.hat higher, and the price obtained for. our wheat a degree less, .It is, therefore, a-question of considerable importance to the New* Zealand

farmers how their- brethren in Australia are d isposing 'of their surplus stock of wheat at the present time, . ... ' -''i

The wheat crops in Australia, were so abundant last season that a very considerable quantity has been available for exportation after supplying local requirements; and as there is no demand nearer home for the surplus stock, large shipments have been, and are being made, to Britain, where prices have been very high, and are likely. to continue so for a longtime to come. The latest accounts from .Europe have rendered English shipp.ers in Australia extremely anxious to.send away all the wheat they can by the vessels now available. The Adelaide: Register of 'a'recent date says:—"We ." are glad to hear that the cargo of wheat " shipped in the Alexandra for England, " by Mr Darwent, has been sold to arrive " at 70s per quarter, which leaves a net "price at this end of something more '.' than 6s per -bushel. This is good news "for the farmers who have shipped;on "their own account, and it shews " that with tb.3- English market .much. " lower than it is at present, in seasons " when pur crops are large, we may expect " to export to England with a prospect of " fair profits. A gentleman, writing from " Liverpool, predicts that wheat will be " 100s per quarter before the year is out." In fact, the latest advices from England represent the grain market as being in a condition altogether unprecedented. Not only have the North American States ceased to send wheat or flour to the English market as formerly, but the Eastern States have become formidable competitors with European Countries for the produce of Caljfornia and the South American States. Shipments from the latter countries are intercepted and diverted to the Eastern American ports; and a case is reported in which a'cargo of wheat, which hao arrived in an. English port, from San Francisco, was purchased below, the limit, hy the Agent of a New York house, and again sent across the, Atlantic. On its arrival at New York, the cost to the buyers proved to be 6s per quarter less than the saleable value in that city, even though two freights and a commission had to be paid out of it. ' Such, a remarkable occurrence as the reconveyance of a cargo of American wheat across the Atlantic seems to have caused considerable surprise among English corndealers ; and in the agricultural report of a Melbourne contemporary, it is stated that " some alarmists go so far as to say '"that it is doubtful if the Eastern States " of America will ever again be able to "export wheat. In them the breadth of " land under this crop is annually decreas- " ing in consequence of the lands being " worn out; and the distance of the new "land taken up in the interior is so great " that any further travelling would cause "the expense of transit to swallow up " the full value of the cargo on arrival at ." market. The conclusion arrived at with " regard to the New York market is that " for the future price's are likely to rule "as high there .as in, London.;" In summing up the prospects for tne year, the Mark Lane 'Express' says' :—" On the "whole, taking'into account the novel '5 and unexpected competition of the " Northern States of the American Union "for the surplus wheat from Californiaj " the requirements of France, and the " small stock of both foreign and Eng* " lisa wheat' in the United Kingdom, "our merchants will find it difficult "to procure enough, for our wants ere "the new harvest is over." Not only is the stock of wheat in England exceedingly short; but Turkey, Italy, France, and other European countries are this year purchasing from the Baltic Provinces and from Southern Russia, supplies which used nearly all to find their way to England; Prices are consequently rising, and will continue to do so until the close of next harvest ; and as the accounts of next season's crop are not particularly favorable, there is.'. every probability of prices ruling, high for along time to come. Present accounts concur in bearing out, even to a greater extent-than he himself may have anticipated, Mr. Moorhouse's argument as to the possibility of profitably exporting wheat from New Zealand' to England ; and as this is a question of the very highest importance, not only, to the. farmers ;of Otago, .but to oiir merchants, and, indeed; to all classes of. the community, consideration of it will be resumed in a future paper. i

The nomination of candidates for the Port Chalmers Mayoralty takes place on the 16th instant, at the Town Hall. No one is spoken of as yet likely to contest the election. ;

The Reverend T. S. Forsaith is to deliver a lecture in the Pbrt Chalmers Mechanics' Institute, -this evening, the subject being, "A hundred years ago; or the sociar position and advantages of young people in 1767 and 1867: contrasted.". Mr B. L. Farjeon is expected to deliver the next lecture, which takes place on Tuesday, the : 2srd inst.

The.. Second Anniversary of ,the Tailors' Trade Sqciety.was celebrated,.last,.evening," by a supper at' Carrol's Hibernian Hotel, George s^re^.;. Nearly thirty members of the were preseiitj andthe chair was, occupied by Mr Drew, the past President, the newly-electejd president, Mr Macnamara, acting as vice. At one end of the room the new banner of the Sdciety was displayed. »On the Cloth being- drawn, the usual loyal and patriotic toasts were' given heartily. The toast of the evening, <c Success to the Dunedin Tailors' Trade Society, and! all Bonded' Sdcietiesi" was proposed by theSecvetary,atid in doing so he alluded to the"success which hkd> attended the forma^oa of the Society^ tj^e :(unanimlty ■feat' existed between its meinbeira,' and the good feeling; ehbwa towards itl>y the

employers. He also referrea" to the satisfactory financial,position, of the Society, and urged upon the members not to lose sight of the object for which they were banded together, to protect the interests of the trade in a legitimate and conciliatory manner. He spoke in. favor of mutual concessions being made, and suggested that an endeavor should be made to form a council of arbitration, to decide any matter of dispute between employers andemployed. The toast of the' < Past and present Officers of the Society" was next given, and Mr Davidson, in responding, alluded to what had been done by the Society in obtaining regular hours of labor, and proper accommodation for workmen. He deprecated "strikes," and urged upon the members the necessity of co-opera-tion with employers, who, he asserted, were, for the most part, ready -to consult the wishes of their employes. Other toasts were then given, amongst which were " His Honor, the Superintendent, "" ." The Employers," "The Chairman," "The Press," "The Ladies," and the "Host and Hostess," all of which were suitably responded to. During the evening a number of songs were sung ; an original one entitled " Pit your Shoother to the Wheel," by Mr Watson, being much applauded. Altogether, the evening passed off most pleasantly, and the tailors may be congratulated upon the success attending their anniversary meeting.

A fatal accident occurred under very melancholy circumstances, yesterday morning, at Robinson's Inlet, Sandfly, on the ocean side of the .Peninsula. From the information obtained by Constable Bevin, who visited the locality, it appears that a young man named Levi Buskin was at the inlet with his father, William Buskin, a settler in the neighbourhood. He and his father were sitting on the beach, where their boat was moored, and as he was in the act of handing some shingles io his father, a heavy wave rolled in on the beach, broke over him, and carried him out to sea. His father was also made wet by the same wave, but he retained his footing. The accident occurred at an early hour in the morning, and up to 5 p.m. the body had not been found, but the father of the deceased and' a number of the neighbors continued to examine the beach, in the expectation that it would be washed ashore. The' deceased was only twenty-one years of age. • '■'.

The general satisfaction with which the Bohemian Glasa-blowers' entertainment has been received since their visit to Dunedin was evinced by the attendance yesterday evening, on the occasion of the complimentary benefit to Mrs Woodroffe. Notwithstanding the unfavorable weather, the Polytechnic was well filled, and those who attended were rewarded by the exhibition of a number of interesting experiments, and the distribution; of valuable prizes.

The Committee of the Total Abstinence Society meet at the Athenaeum building, tonight.

A special meeting of the Ofcago Acclimatisation Society will be held at the Athenaeum, on Thursday afternoon.

A Summons Meeting of the A.1.0.0.F., Pioneer Lodge, will be held this evening.

The members of A.0.F., Court Pride of Dunedin, will meet this evening, at the Royal George Hotel, for the election of officers. :

The adjourned meeting of the Chamber;of Commerce will be held on' Thursday afternoon, at 4 o'clock.' ■

The monthly meeting of 931, E.C, Lodge of Dunedin, will be held this evening.

:The Committee of the Otago Benevolent Institution, by advertisement in another column, acknowledge the receipt of LlO 15s from Messrs Borton and M 'Master, Waitaki; L 4 from Mrs Shand, Green Island; L 2 17s 6d from Miss L. Brodie ; and 20 bags of flour and 24 bags potatoes from Mr John Jones.

A man named Henry Loffhagen has been drowned in the river Ashley, in Canterbury, by f ailing from his horse when crossing the stream.

Mr John. Bumside ha 3 been appointed Deputy Returning Officer for the districts of Dunedin, Roslyn, and Caversham, for the election of members of the House of Representatives. '

Ah accident fatal to two miners is reported by the Hokitika papers. Two men, named John Regan and Charles Moir, were working in a drive at Ross, on Wednesday week, when the earth caved in and buried their.. The bodies were not recovered for some hours afterwards. :

Turkish baths are about to be established in Adelaide ; the cost will be about L7OO. About L3OO have already been collected, and the Corporation has promised to supplement any sum not exceeding L4OO.

The public lamps at "Williamstown (Victoria) ;are now lighted with gas at tM.rate of L 6 15s per annum. The streets of Launcsstbn are about to be lighted, with gas, at a contract price of LIOOO per annum.

Agricultural statistics are to be collected: in Canterbury, as has already been done in this Province. Arrangements have been made with the various members of the' police force, stationed in the agricultural districts throughout the Province, ] to collect the necessary information. .

The last Panama mail brought news 6f the death of Dr. Allison, an old and respected resident of the Province of Wellington. He left New Zealand'in-ill-health, and on the 30th of May he died, of yellow fever, at St. Peter's Island. ;

The members of the Chess Club recently formed in connection with the Athenseum, met last evening in considerable force. Before play commeaced -a number of chessmen and boards were submitted for approval by the Honorary Secretary of the Club, and welce ordered to be purchased. Duringthe greater part of the evening six boards were simultaneously hv use, and a very r.espesta>le " show" was made in the matter of play. ?

The Grey River Argus notices a remark-' able curiosity in -the way of gold discoveries. Itr is simply a stick, or branch, or roptilet. (apparently of red pine^of about 13 ine&es in lerigtb, and perhaps six inches in circuW &rence,nrach contorted and water-worn,! in Lin wMclrare imbedded a number of nuggets Snd "specks * of > gr^d, besides • a g6o<£*riied pebblesor %wo ? wHch are ateo ibJLcHyJiii-

] crusted with a kind -of-scaly coating of the precious metaL There is one little nugget particularly, so. placed, and of such a size and shape, as to remind one exactly of the breast-pin in a very quiet old gentleman's cravat. Under every little knob or crevice in the wood, where theie is a slight cavity for the gold to lodge, there gold is to be seen. It is much indurated, as though it had been subjected to heavy pressure, and shows no appearance whatever o£ an approach towards petrefattion. It was brought down to the- Warden's office at Cobden, from Blackball, where it was found by a man who was burning drift-wood. Alter having burnt a considerable quantity his attention was attracted by a glittering appearance itf a piece he was chopping, and he was induced to wash the ashes of the wood he had previously been burning, when; he succeeded in washing out 2 dwts. He then picked out the piece which we are describing as a specimen, and found it'so remarkable as to think it well worth preserving. Tts appearance would suggest the theory of its having lain in the bottom of a stream, over which the gold was flowing, and which has been forced into the interstices of the wood while it was in a comparatively soft condition, and that: it has since become hardened by the pressure of the deposits that have been formed above it. This curious piece of auriferous timber might worthily claim for itself the title of one of Planches prettiest extravaganzas, "The Golden Branch."

Mr Hamilton delivered the fifth of his series of six lectures on "Phrenology," last evening, in Farley's Hall. It does not derogate from the character of Mr Hamilton's first lectures, to say that, as he approaches the completion of the series, the lectures afford a higher form of instruction, and an increased amount of entertainment. The reason is that the lecturer is not so much hampered by a description of the technicalities of Phrenology, and is more at liberty to expatiate, as he does fluently, and often eloquently, on the application of a knowledge of the science to the moral and intellectual advancement of the individual or of society at large. Last evening his lecture abounded with "wise saws" on social subjects, considered in their relation to the study of phrenology ; and his earnest, yet lively, manner of delivery, secured the attention of his audience throughout, notwithstanding the time it occupied, and the multiplicity of his illustrations. His sixth lecture is to be delivered at the.same place of meeting on the evening of Thursday nexs.

A return of the quantity of gold exported from New Zealand during the quarter ending 31st March, appears in the Gazette of the 27th ult. The following are the quantities shipped at the different ports :—Auckland, 7350z5. Marlborough—Havelock, 1260z5. Nelson Province—Nelson, 27040z5; Westport, 85700z5; Greymouth,ifis,2B3ozs; Hokitika, 28060z5. Canterbury Province—Hokitika, 65,2420z5, Greymouth, 10,4170z5. Otago— Dunedin, 31,1860z5. Southland—lnvercargill, 21600z5; Bluff Harbor, 3ozs. The total quantities from" the three Provinces exporting most largely were— 39,3630z3 from Nelson ; 75,6590zs from Canterbury; 31,1880zs from Otago. Of the quantity exported from Dunedin, 10,2090zs were sent to England, and 20,9770izs to Victoria. The. total export of the Colony for the! quarter was 149,2320z5, and the total quantity since the discovery of gold, 3,208,6930z5, the figures for the Provinces being—Auckland, 21,5220zs ; Marlborouglv :33,3850z5; Nelson, 332,7550zs ; Canterbury, 722,2240z5; Otago, 2 5 090,2280z5; Southland, 85790z5. . . ■ ■,

•The Tuapehx, Press reports that His Honor the Superintendent visited the Blue Spur, on Saturday week, and was waited upon by some of the residents, who brought under his notice the present state of the road across the Spur. His Honor promised to bring.the matter before the Executive, and he had no doubt a "sufficient sum of money would be granted for the purpose of cutting a new track. He suggested the advisability of an Improvement Committee being formed, to carry out any works undertaken, whictr suggestion was carried.intd effect on Tuesday last, when a Committee, consisting of Messrs* Hutchison, Fulton, Morrison, Matthews, M'Lelland, Kepple, Hinde, Ladingham and M'lntosh, were elected to look after the interests of the district generally. His Honor also visited the Teviot, and received a deputation at Woodhouse and Gordon's Union Hotel. ■ ■"■

Mr Warden Simpson, writing from Upper Manuherikia, under date 30th June, says :— "Very little remunerative labor has been done by the miners in this district during the month, in consequence of the hard frosts that, until within the last few days, *have prevailed. At St. Bathans, the miners, in anticipation of a season such as has just gone, have been actively engaged constructing sludge channels to command the greatest natural fall that; can be-obtained from the basin. The claim on the Deep Lead, Blacks No. 3,- alluded to in my last, lass had a washing quite -"equaTito" expectations, the 300 loads of wash haying-gone at the rate of 2oz to the load. : Notwithstanding the most unfavorable weather for mining, the escort of goldior the month from this district amounts to upwards ofl2oo ounces. The total population of the district is 885, and the irate of wagesisL3l2sa W .eek." ■ ■ '.-■

The HoMtika v Evening /SSfar sayß that the continuance of a northerly sea has by its action stilt further encroached upon the. North Spit. This once thickly populated portion of the beach is now nearly deserted. ; During the last fortnight quite a stampede, has takea place, ' and a large number of cottages have beea removed to safer quarters^ , •

- The following account ol the. capture of Anderson, who essaped latdy froixt Kelson gaol, is giveptj>y Anderson was captured distance up the Maitai Talley. . As^aoia as. tlie; esbaps !was known to the polie%v constables were sent off in various dueptions,, and two of these^ constables Shoixe'and Beattie, were despatched •ove^the.Maungatapu^o.thePelorus, as far asHavelock, On their way up the Maitai, constables-SHone:< and. JBeattie iuformed a j. settler ,named, .Smith, wfc.o liyes about five miles'up the valleyy of the escape of ,the prisoner, whereupop!: Smith loosened a dog

"which he Keeps chained tip on his- premises^ About 8 o?clock on Tuesday night, Smit&. heard his dog bark violently, and in a manner which confirmed him in the belief thafe some stranger was about the placer.- Unable at first to see any person, he challenged, bnfc received no reply. He then called out, thafc unless the person hiding showed himself he would set the dog upon him, on wMch ay voice was heard to say, < For God's sake^ don't. If you wul call off the dog, I wilt come out.' The man, who proved to be Anderson, then came out from behind a pigstye, where he had sheltered himself, and being at once known to Smith from the description he had received of him from th& constables, he pinioned his arms until laV mate came to his assistance, and with a rope made the prisoner secure. He was theit brought into Nelson, and lodged in the sta-tion-house j and the following morning was brought up before the Resident Magistrate, by whom he was remanded till this morning* when it is expected he will be ordered to be put in irons. Anderson had only eaten & turnip during the time that had elapsed between his escape and capture, and had suffered greatly both from hunger and cold.**

By order of the Governor, the Officers-corn.-nianding or Adjutants of Militia and Volnateers in the different Provinces, are the persons appointed to receive the arms, accoutrements, and other articles, supplied to any officer, non-commissioned officer, orvplunteer' of any corps, -which has been dbsbanded in terms of the eighteenth section of the Volunteer Act, 1865.

Our attention has been called to the faefr that in an article recently published respecting the assault on Benjamin Harbord, at Gabriel's Gully, it was stated that WTrM'Keay, from the office of Mr Ward, appeared on behalf of the accused Chinaman. The name should have been that of Mr J. L. S. Keen—notof Mr M'Keay.

The Tuapeka Press mentions that no candidate is yet in the field for the office oT Mayor of Lawrence. ' A requisition to Mir Horace Bastings is in course of signatnxe.

The romantic drama of "The Lonely Mant of the Ocean" was repeated at the Princes* Theatre last evening; and.the favoriteoML burlesque of "The Bride of Abydos" was produced. Miss Jenny Nye looked dashing-, aud played spiritedly as Selim; and shesang and danced well. There was less" of the air of the " heavy swell" about her Selim than. is usual j but it was a consistent and a good whole, notwithstanding. Miss Dolly Grreea was excellent as Zuleika. Mr Roberts was the Pacha; and Mr Wilmot, as Mirza, the pirate, did well the burlesquing of the Ghosfc in "Hamlet," and was as bombastically ferocious as could be desired. Mr Howe played Osman Bey; and Mr Herberte mada much fun out of the part of Haroun.. Theburlesquing of acrobatic feats was done moreearnestly and laughably than isusual; aatL the burlesque altogether passed off very fairly for a first night. It is to be repeated this evening, with the comedy of " Babes, in the Wood." ■ ,

Writing from Cromwell, June 29th, Mir Warden Stratford reports that there has beets an almost total cessation of mining by sluicing during the present month, owing to very severe frosts, which also have had the effecfcof exposing a greater extent of river beacfe than I have seen for the last four yeais^ Here and there parties have taken up beaeEt claims, but sluicing claimholders generally have preferred remaining by their claims^, working for short periods on occasional thaws. There has been a slight exodus a£ Chinese, those remaining are either; travelling or working by the river side..: They are peaceable and orderly, and seem io"have a. better opinion of the river banks than the European miners have. The total popo.-^ lation of the district is 650 : there beingMiners, 400 ; Chinese miners, 100 ; others not following mining pursuits, 150.

A recent advertisement in the Wellingfcoifc papers, emanating from the Defence Office^ calling for ten active young men for militaiy .service in the Chatham Islands, attracted more than a hundred applicants. The tea. whojsvere chosen were enlisted for a year, afe a salary of 3s 6d a day, the Government finding rations and a partial kit, consisting: of two serge coats, a grey coat> a forage cag, and two pairs of boots.

The ship Ironside, which arrived at Anekland from London, on the 17th ult;, had oct board the following stock for Mr Brown, of Napier:—A thoroughbred horse, a cart 'stallion, two sheep dogs, a bull dog,aod a qt&atityof poultry, pigs, &o. The cart stallioffi. Prince Arthur, is said to be a fiae animal« ' and the thoroughbred horse, Gownsman, ha& distinguished, himself on the turf. As aL three-year-old, in 1864J he started eighfe times/won five, and was second twice, la 1865 started nine; times, won. five races, aoct was second once.

Mr Richard Creeth reports tifefe^t crusfeing- of the Great Scandinavian Quartz Mitting Company, Skippers, as follows :^-50tans: quartz crushed, producing lODoz. gold. Th&^ small quantity of stone crushed was owing ta the severe frost,- which- has brought -fiie= machinery almost to a stand; . Mining operations were progressing as usuatT

The following is gazetted an addition^ regulation under the GrOldSelds Act, 18g^ as to the mode o£ the issue of miners' rights in the Province of ptago-:—" Every Miller's Right shall, before, the issue thereof, be^gnei. by some Warden aotißg within tfe !; sai<^. Province." _ ' ■ ■■'■

Mr Richard Edwin. Meld is gazetted a& Registrar of Births, Deaths, and" Marriages,, for the district of Ma'agjherikia, in&. the room of Mr J. C. Thomson Mr J. B. Borton has heeri appointed. Bjsgistrar for tha district of Waitahuha, instead, of Mr J^ Maekay ; and in the We'^ Tai®?i district,, Mr G-. Crockett succeeds ]S£: J. Fulton.

From Mount Benger IMx Warden Hicksont. furnishes the following repaid dated Juna 30th :—" The Molyn'3«x is lower now than ife

has been for the last, three years* and, th&miners from the outlying districts have, wit!*, a few exception^ come in, t® work $» beaches, •which are in some cases turning oufc moat profitably. At the jvwcjdoa of tba. Teviot with the Glutha, there iaarlarge beacht bare which has all been,, taken, up. One-of. the claims is eiapldyiiag sixteen, men. in trcot

"shifts, artd from what I could learn from one 'of the shareholders, I should say was turning out remarkably well. The weather has been very fine up, to last week, when there were some heavy fails of rain. However that has .not caused the river to increase in volume. It is to be hoped that it may continue so, for the sake of the miners, who .have in many instances gone to some expense in getting into the ground. The estimated population of the district is :—European miners, 400; Chinese, miners, 40; storekeepers and others, 70. Total, 510. Rates ;of wages, L 3 12s to L 4 a week."

In the Resident Magistrate's Court yesterday, Alfred Keene sought to recover from Mr Vincent Pyke L 5 alleged to have been paid iothe defendant by Messrs Ware and Co. in 1865, and to be due to the plaintiff for mile- • age fees upon a survey of a machinery area at Hindon. Mr Smythies appeared for the =plaintiff, and Mr Macassey for the defendant. The case fell through, Mr Creetli, one of the witnesses, stating that the L 5 had been paid ■$>y him to the defendant, not on account of • Messrs Ware and Co., as stated in the plainstiffs particulars of summons, but on behalf of the Hindon Quartz Crushing Company—a -company properly registered. In answer to Mr. Macassey, the witness also stated that the L 5 Jdad been returned to him by the -defendant.- The plaintiff was nonsuited. The other cases heard were not of importance.

From Okarita, we learn that a rush, caiised hy a party of men at work on the ground for stores, recently took place to a ■spot between the Waikahupu River and "Gillespie's Beach. Altogether about a hundred and fifty men went to the place, but -only half-a-dozen remained. There is only ibhe one shaft—that of the prospectors— •bottomed, at a depth of fifteen feet, with four inches of black sand. The men .-«aid that they were only paying expenses, but the ground nevertheless looks very promising. In consequence of the depression of business at Okarita, the New Zealand and New South Wales Banks have considered it -advisable to close their respective agencies there. The I.ondon Times of April 30th, contained ,~3;he following with respect to the New Zealand Banking Corporation (Limited)^ or Commercial Bank, which, however, is wrongly designated as the " New Zealand Bank-:"—" At the Rolls Chambers yesterday, the affairs of $he New Zealand Bank, now in the course of feeing wound up, came before Mr HawKus, :the chief clerk, when Mr James Cooper, the -official liquidator, attended. Some matters ~were advanced, and proceedings were to be "forthwith adopted at New Zealand with regard to the colonial shareholders. A judgement had been given by the Court at New - Zealand which would facilitate the affairs in England, la answer to a question whether -■there would be 20s in the.pound for;the 'creditors, it was stated that a composition *would, it was expected, be accepted."

. The. Melbourne Herald relates that "a -Tather amusing mistake was committed, in the Insolvent Court lately. Two insolvents of the name of John Bryan were applying for '•■ their certificates of discharge, and. upon "the name being called, John Bryan, thea- " "trical agent, of ITitzroy, answered to the summons, and had his certificate granted, Trat it was afterwards discovered tliat the person entitled to it was a farmer of that name. * The mistake was accordingly rectified, and ""the theatrical Bryan will have yet to;, go ' "through a further process of law before he -icaa obtain lls discharge." .

. There is to be a sitting of the Supreme * '^Court in Banco to-day. Demurrers in Robinson v. Reynolds and Every y. Reynolds 'iad been set down for argument • but they - lave been withdrawn, and will be again set ■-down for the next sitting of the Court. * There are two other demurrers to be argued '"ii6«day'j and it is. understood that some reserved judgments-will be delivered.

The "schooner wMcn was built at Pelichet Bay, by Messrs JoTmson and Kelly, and launched a few days ago, is now alongside "^tuart-street jetty, where she .is being * masted and rigged as a fore-and-aft schooner; -She is named the Dagmar. She is a vessel -sb£. about 43 tons-register, and has been built ~<on a very good-model for a schooner of her -■size. .From her appearance she is likely to tbe a vessel that will sail well, and to be of -more than average carrying capacity for her tonnage. At. the same jetty! the •^steamer Lady of the Lake'is.receiving afew : finishing touches from the carpenterandthe previous to making an experimental $rip to Port Chalmers, on Wednesday next.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ODT18670709.2.11

Bibliographic details

THE Otago Daily Times. "Inveniam viam out Faciam." DUNEDIN, TUESDAY, JULY 9., Otago Daily Times, Issue 1723, 9 July 1867

Word Count
5,462

THE Otago Daily Times. "Inveniam viam out Faciam." DUNEDIN, TUESDAY, JULY 9. Otago Daily Times, Issue 1723, 9 July 1867

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