Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

MR M'DERMID AT PORT CHALMERS.

Mr M'Dermid addressed the electors of the Port Chalmers District, on Wednesday evening, at Crickmore's Royal Assembly Rooms. Mr James Smith pre-

sided.

Mr M'Dermid said that, in seeking their suffrages, it was necessary to explain that he had never given any promise that he would not contest the Election; notwithstanding a rumour to that effect had been circulated. The candidates in the field might bo classified as local and outsiders. He had always advocated that men should represent the district. One of the candidates was Mr Main, who was gifted with the power of speech. It was his trado, and it the qualification required was merely speaking, he would vote for Mr Main. He, however, held that it was not for ability to speak, but sound rejisoning and judgment, that a man should

be sent to the General Assembly to represent the District He did not think Mr Main a proper man, inasmuch as he was a squatter, and would, no doubt, like to see sheep on the land, rather than a settled population, which would bo diametrically opposite to the interests of Port Chalmers. If Mr Main supported the squatting interest in

the Gen end Assembly, he would not like to see him there, as it was tho squatting interest that was opposed to Separation. He believed that Mr Main w;is a thorough Scparationist; but he also believed that squattocracy would be supported by him in the Gcnei-al Assembly against the interests of the Province. As regarded Mr M'lndoo, he had made the cleverest speech lie ever knew him make at the nomination of the Superintendent. He had not seen anything clever in him since. 'Referring to Captain Malcolm, he said that he wsis no more a local candidate than Mr Main, or the man in the moon. He was a member of a steamboat company ; and it was questionable whether he would forward the railway interest from Port Chalmers to Dunedin. Mr Malcolm was against making the road to Blueskin, lest the wool taken to Dunedin and brought down by the steamers would go direct' to tho Port, and improve Port Chalmers. His (Mr'M'Dermid's) interests were associated with themselves, and anything he would do for the district was

for the good of all. He came before them with common sense, and with the intention of saying no more than was necessary. A man might be ever so good a talker; but it mattered nothing if there was no sound judgment iv his speech. Capt. Malcolm had not had the political experience that he himself had acquired. He had never been in any sense a public man. For years back, ho (Sir M'Dermid) had taken his share in public matters. Ho was lately on the Education Committee, and opposed the taxation proposed. His

motion was ultimately carried, and he was glad to think the action he then took was beneficial to the locality as well as to others. He had had experience at many Boards, and in other public offices, so he thought he would do no discredit to himself or his constituency, if elected. Mr Main said he simply came forward because the delegated powers of the Goldfields were refused the Superintendent. Other reasons might have induced him, as for years past the Province had been bitterly robbed by the General Government Mr Main never spoke of that. The Maori war was alike disgraceful to tho money expenditure ss to the British arms. The three million loan was intended to bring the disturbances to a close. It had been expended, and almost as much more. His blood boiled when ho thought of L 200,000 per annum leaving the Province forthe North. It was an absurd idea, to havo ten regiments there, where a small company would have sufficed, But so long as the South supported the North, war mil continue. The war in the North stood in the

same relation as the gold-digging to the South. If returned, he would endeavor to havo matters brought about to stop all Native wars, as also to obtain the delegated powers to the Superintendent. He expected that half a million out of the million lean voted would be granted when docks and other public works would bo proceeded with. Mr Main was for dredging, so as take large vessels up to Dunedin. What would the Port do then ? Its chief trade would be taken away, as also so much money thrown into the Harbor, which had cost the Province L 187,000 already, and nothing to show for it. He (Mr M'Dermid) was, however, in favor pf dredging to eleven or twelve , feet to the present jetties, so as to allow vessels coining up the natural channel jetty accommodation. He was in favor of railways and inland roads,-so that producers could bring their goods to market or a shipping port. I

In reply to, questionsii—He was in favor of ammunition-and uniform being giveri to Volunteers gratis, as 1 he considered if men gaye their tiirie for'notMug, the Government shoulci supplyall

requisites. He was also in favor of coast defences, pending a European war or not, but the first war he expected was a civil war. He would not resign in fevor of Mr Main. If the loan was not got, the General Government Bhould give power to the Dock Trust to issue debentures. If that could not be done, the offer of tho Provincial Government of yearly payments should be accepted. If returned, he would endeavor to see the Roads Deviation Bill put in force. He would cot tax production.

A vote proposing him a proper person, &c, was unanimously carried -, as also, a vote of thanks to the chair.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ODT18670614.2.21

Bibliographic details

MR M'DERMID AT PORT CHALMERS., Otago Daily Times, Issue 1702, 14 June 1867

Word Count
954

MR M'DERMID AT PORT CHALMERS. Otago Daily Times, Issue 1702, 14 June 1867

Working