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WRECK OF THE MARCHIONESS ON THE TARANAKI COAST.

We regret to have to announce the -wreck of the brigantine Marchioness, 170 tons, which put out of this port from stress of weather on Monday morning last. The particulars as nearly as ■we can gather appear to be as follows :—The unfortunate vessel had only partially discharged her cargo when she wa3 obliged to run out on Monday morning, heading north. On same aight shortly after 12 o'clock, the wind shifted from north-west to south-west, blowing and raining heavily, and a high sea running. This continued till three o'clock a.m., when the vessel struck on a bed of rocks, and immediately began to make water rapidly. The night was pitch dark, and the wind and the rain so fierce, that any attempt to leave the wreck would have been almost certain death, nor did anyone on board know exactly what part of the coast they were on, In this state of suspense daylight •was looked for with deepest anxiety. At length the dawn gradually permitted the outline of the •oast to be seen when it was discovered that they -were off a place called Mokotunu, about S

alias from this port, find of course >n heart oi an enemy's country. Their distanca from the shore being about a quarter of a mile. As soon as these facts were ascertained it appeared to the unfortunate men as if they had only tho choice of two dfaths, eithpr to drown, or land and be murdered. At length it was decided to chance the landing, and accordingly the boat with a warp ■was go! on shore, by which latter means the remainder of the hands landed. The vessel had no ammunition on board, and only one musket, which Mr Cocks, the pilot from this port, very prudently destroyed and thew into the sea before he left the vessel." Having all landed in safety, the party started along the beach for the nearest of our outposts which they reached during the following night without, strange and fortunate to say, being seen by or seeing one single native. Their march was one of great fatigue having to cross several creeks and rivers, in one. of which the (Stoney Biver) they were up to their necks in the water. The first se&try they approached fired on them not expecting white men to be in that direction. The party called out that they were shipwrecked mariners when of course they were r ceived into the camp and treated with every kindness. They all reached town yesterday. The Marchioness had about 300 tons of flour and grain on board at the time of her going on shore, she is now beyond <;oubt a total wreck. The escape of the party Jfrom falling into the hands of the Maoris was almost miraculous. The ill-fated vessel belonged we believe to local owners, and was insured far L2OOO in the New Zealand Insurance Company. No blame is attached to anyone we understand.—" Taranaki News." May 19.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ODT18640530.2.7

Bibliographic details

WRECK OF THE MARCHIONESS ON THE TARANAKI COAST., Otago Daily Times, Issue 764, 30 May 1864

Word Count
504

WRECK OF THE MARCHIONESS ON THE TARANAKI COAST. Otago Daily Times, Issue 764, 30 May 1864

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