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DISCOVERY OF THE BODY OF SERGEANT GARVEY.

We regret to have to announce that the worst - apprehensions concerning the fate of this greatly esteemed and most unfortunate officer have beeu confirmed. On the 30th,ult. his body was found by one of the searching parties, lying beside a rock surrounded by "deep snow. He had apparently been dead for some days. We have been favored by the Commissioner of Police with a perusal of the official correspondence on' the subject, from which we learn the following particulars. Sergeant Garvey and Mounted Constable M'Donald left the Hogburn on the 23rd ult. for the. purpose of reporting on the rush, about, 14 miles to the east of the Hogburn. They arrived at the foot of the range'about 5.30 p-m., and on the following morning reached the rush with great difficulty, occasioned by a very heavy snow storm, about half-past eleven o'clock., Having obtained information as to the operations and prospects of the diggers, and finding 'no food or shelter for their horses, tlie two left the diggings in company with a bakev named Harry M'Gee, at about one p.m.. during a severe snow storm, and after proceeding for about three hours and a half in a south-easterly direction, as they supposed, they came to a gorge which appeared to them to run south. After following it for soma distance, constable M'Donald a 1 vised Sergeant Garvey to return and take the spur, believing the gorge to be impassible. Garvey, however, insisted on following the gorge, and in consequence his companions and he parted company—the constable and M'Gee turning their horses loose and treading down a track in ths snow. They cqntinued walking on it till daylight,\the snowdrifting all the time, On the. morning of the 25th the constable saw that they were in the vicinity of a high mountain, to the top'of which he proceeded to get a better view of the country. - Prom this point he saw two men on a range about three miles distant, and, proceeding towards them, at last succeeded, in attracting their atttention by pistol shots. He learnt that he was about a mile, north-east from the diggings, at. which he arrived at- about 11 a.m., himself and,his horse being'thoroughly exhausted. M'Gee being unable to proceed, was left at the diggings, and the constable having given his horse some stimulant, succeeded in reaching an accommodation-house at the foot of the range, where he arrived at about 4p.m. ; and pn the "looming of- the 2(}th left '>eh' TQitte for Hogburn, and reacr; that place at 1 p.m., With both feet frost-bitten, not having, seen or he^pd anything of Sergeant Garvey since leaving, ■him on the evening of the 24th. Q'n the 30th, Sergeant Ryan reported to the Commissioner the progress of the search expedition. Mounted constables Paschen and Hurrell, in company with-a volunteer named Galbraith, went out on Saturday to exadVine the locality where the Sergeant was lost, but returned on the following night without having discovered any trace of him. They found it impossible to continue the search further, their horses being quite knocked up, and the .ground, covered with snow. Un Sunday , ,m,qrni.ng, a volunteer party pf si?, headed by Mr I.c Wolfe,'' started qh a searching expedition, and succeeded in tracking the Serjeant for a distance of sixteen miles, up to Vhero a leading spur dips into the Waitaki Plains. This party returned on Tuesday night, $ejr provisions bbinp run out, in tho fyll qoi_\-

donee that Sergeant Gurvey had made some of the sheep stations on the Waitaki. On the Monday, Detective Rowley and four volunteers started" m search, with the intention of following up the missing man's track, and penetrating through to the Waitaki. Detective Rowley's report now follows in order, and narrates the finding of the body of the ill-fated Sergeant. The officer, in company with three men named Joseph Potter, Isaac Allen, and Thomas FlemiDg, came across what they supposed to be Sergeant Garvey's tracks, on the morning of Tuesday, the 29th September, in a deep gorge abnut ten miles north-west from Clark's Rush. They followed the track about ten miles with the stream, when they lost it in the snow for several miles, but found it again on Wednesday, the 30th September, lending in an easterly direction to the top of a high mountain. Here they once more lost it on account of a fresh fall of snow. But in descending towards the river to get shelter for ths night, Detective Rowley saw the body of Sergeant Garvey lying beside a rock. This was about sundown on Wednesday. On examining the bo.ly it was found to be quite dead,- and seemed to have been so for some time. It was surrounded with three or four feet of snow. The Sergeant had evidently been quite exhausted when he lay down. In his pockets were found a gold watch and steel chain, a L 5 note, sixteen Ll notes, 18s in silver, an order on the Union Bank tor LlO, a purse,~small 'key, revolver, &c. The horse he had ridden was found about half a mile off, with' his saddle and bridle on. The horse and the body were conveyed to the M<) nt Ida Police Camp, which was reached on Saturday lust.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ODT18631006.2.15

Bibliographic details

DISCOVERY OF THE BODY OF SERGEANT GARVEY., Otago Daily Times, Issue 562, 6 October 1863

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DISCOVERY OF THE BODY OF SERGEANT GARVEY. Otago Daily Times, Issue 562, 6 October 1863

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