Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

GOLD FIELDS SUMMARY.

Since our last monthly summary, there has been a steady improvement'in the mining interests of the Province. The winter season we m-iy now cousider as drawing to a close; the excessive storms of snow and rain of lasfcmonth have been exehauged for fine open weather, and mining operations are being rapidly resumed on all the places from which the severities of the sea-son had pre/iously driven the miners; It is now ascertained beyond a doubfc that the reports of accident-, from snow drifts, floods and othercauses, which have been so rife, were exaggerated, the safety of many mining parties who were supposed to have perished having been sitUfkctori.'y ascertained. The various auriferous streams have subsided consider ably, and as a cons»queuce, the beiches and beds are being again worked as the water fulls. Prospecting is being extensively followed now the weather is fine, and several new discoveries of auriferous ground are reported. From all tii3 gold fklds the reports indicate the ganeral revival of mining operations and the steady extension of,the known auriferous areas. Already- has the improved, state •of the wea ther made itsslf fclfc in an increase of the quantity of gold brought down by escort. It will be seen by reference to the tabulated statistics in another column ! that oz of gold have been broutrlit down by escort during the currant year. The export of gold for the current year up to tlm date amounts to ozWe now proceed to notice the various gold field.?. The Dunstna district lias scarcely yet recoverod from the depression caused by the disastrous flood.*, and the rush to the new diggings on tin Hogburn, nowknown as the Mount Ida gold-field. During the latter half of tho month of August the weather was excessively severe, and several lives were loss from exposure to cold, but as we have already stated there has not been that loss of life which, was at onetime supposed. Mining interests in the I) unstan district are steadily improviog, and with the approach of summer we may look for large escorts again. "There are several important diggings situated at various distances from the Dunstan camp, but which may be fairly considered as connected with the Dunstaa gold field. At a place known as Campbell's Gully, which is situate about 20 miles from, the Manuherikia and 14 from the Teviofc stream, some 500 or 600 miners have bsen at work all the winter, the attractions of the locality surmounting the dangers of the snow. Where the ground is workable, it is in very deep and narrow gullies, where the snow does not penetrate to hinder mining operations. The sinking is from sto 17 feet in depth, but not much of the latter. All the drift is washed by sluicing, a stream of water running down the centre of all the gullies, and timber for boxes can be got in the adjoining forest. The Bold is of a very rough nature, quite different from that obtained on the Molyneux; it exactly resembles that obtained in the Bendigo or Castlemaiae dis-

tricts—it is equally of as nuggetty description, but a little darker in color. The miners at .13)ack's continue to do well, and a good deal of gold is beins; produce d. At the rush near Shiel's station there are about 100 men at work. Coarse gold hns been found over a space of two miles, in this neighborhood. At Thompson's, which is 21 miles from the Dunstnn Gamp, and 12 from Black's station, about 200 diggers are doing well, the gold obtained is fine. All along the coursa of the Molyn»ux and its numerous tributaries, new ground cont;nue3 to be opened up. insome instances, with excellent results. The attention of the mining eommun'tyis now a good deal directed t« the country ■ stret«hiiipr from the Slanuherikiaand between the llag-gedy Ran ires and the Kakanui Mountains. Over a large area of this district goid is f.nind very generally distributed, and it. is the general opinion extensive a;id productive gold fields will ha develops^ during the ensuing summer. At.present the diggiugs on the Hogbum which have been-oiti-iiallv proolafniod under the tifclo of the Mount Ida gold field, are turning out very lucrative, arid extendiuir in every tlireeiinn. The first escort from this gold field arrived on the 3rd inst. \vil.h432oozs gold • Our own correspondent; at Mount Ida.reports most iavourahly of the prospects of the miners in uUis locality. ISo very startling-"finds" are made, but w fl at is tar better, the miners are generally well employed, and make very fair averoge remuneration. It is very probable that this peculiarity will extend vw c f the distric '- a'tiiough occasionally ~uT\ d °, f Au"ust a laah oi' grw Promise was f™^^«- Our

Reports are current of new rnshss in several directions, but with one exception, I cannot trace them toanyrelmolesourca. The one lo which I refer fe situate in the gorge of the Manuherikia, about twelve miles from here, and, I believe, on Saxton's run. The VVaikoumti road rims within f.mr miles of if, and it is easily found by-keeping straight on trough the gorge, instead of.following.the road down Mackstone dill.: l'orthisa considerable number have started to-day, and the accounts from it are of the mo*t flowing charactaiv The average-yield-is reported to be 3 3 awn to tbe tin dish—gold- coarse, depth of •sinking ■-two-to fire fret; and average del-th of wash-dirt twenty inches. 1 know that for a" "considerable length of/tiaie a. few partHi have bsen working in that locality, and that: some coarse sold was Rot oaf. Wh-thsr it will prove a remaaerative iield for a large population ha 9 yet to be ascertained."

The latest accounts confirm the opinions expressed as to the generally auriferous character of that part of the country, and a large increase to the population has taicen piaee. A company has been started for the purpose of dredging the Molyneux Eiver for gold, and the shares are said to be nearly all taken up Theroct<y nature of the river bed is considered to prove a great obstacle to the success of the scheme. The latest official report from the Bunstan is to "the following eifect:—The .River Molyneux is steadily butslowiy going down, and the weather in every respect resemblr-s that of last August and September. In consequence of the experience of last season, tie miners holding river beach claims still entertain hopes of being able to -work them successfully. At the Kawara, the recent high- state of the river has been favorable to the prospecting of the banks, and several races are on the point of completion, and will soon be brought to bear upon them. There is no doubt from the amount of gold obtained by stripping and tunnelling the banks, that these sluicing claims will turn out most profitable speculations to their fortunate owners. I regret to say that the Princess Alexandra shaft, the novel construction of which. I have noticed in former reports, has baen abandoned. During the temporary secession from work of the enterprising prospectors, ou account of the water, the sidvs caved in, and it is justly, considered unßafe to work it further. The other shaft is most properly classed as " deep ticking,'* for it is" now Bunk to the dipth of 143 feet, and neither bottom nor wa fer has been struck. This shaf r. is sank entirely without timber, ana is near Surface Hill, at the nioath of the Kawanu G-orge; the owners anticipate rich dirt should the bottom prove dry; if not, I do not think they could work to that depth without seadin°- for pumping gear from Duaedin or elsewhere.

From the Lake district the accounts are also favorable, and the woi-3t of the winter may now be considered to be over. Writing on the 21st August, our Queenstown correspondent reported as follows :--The weather continues beautifully fine. ■ The Arrow and Shotover rivers are reported to be still falling; while the Lake has withdrawn into Its. own proper limits leaving- the roail by tU * be*ch from this to Frankton agidfl passable for horse an. 2 foot travellers. No reliable statistics of tbo results' of u>ii;iug operations have reached-me since ray. last,.but the miners on the bhotover are very sanguine, and there are reports well accredited, except as to locality, of very good finds since the late floods. A eornnuinication from the Arrow township, received, this afternoon, states that things generally are dull, but the companiss and claims adjoining are in full work. On the 2nd September, the reports were still more satisfactory ; our correspondent wrote :—•• The snow is still itnperceptibly arrowing small by degrees and beautifully less on the lotcy ranges, from the spurs and lower elevations of which it has entirely disappeared. Great activity prevails in ail mining. operations, and as a conseqence, business is becoming brisker every '.day. in the towD. Pack-horses are by no means now the " black swans" they used to be a month or so ago, and at all hours may be seen dragging their weary length in or out of the ftveet*, or losing'with ail toe necessaries of life at the doors of smiling storekeepers." :

Iv the neighborhood-of the Arrow township two new rushes are reported.—Oae not far'from'the F.ird on the Dujstaa Soarf, wiv-re it is said 'that 100 claims have been takou ur>, and fam which th^re is no doubvsocie-.gold has come in. The plaoe is no secret, bein^ a gully runaia* dovm into a sinail flat, four miles from the township, and several old miners have .taken up ground, ss^ertiag great coufilence in its value. The other rush is by no ra«s»ns so well accredited; it w somawiiaro iii the nsigiibarhood of what is called the Ten Mile Shaaty. on the Ounstan road, i'hs lotsaliry in kept quiet. Heavy go!d is said to have come from the^e, and many pa-ties no doubt are on the watch to track the prospectors" arid, their friends. There is a considerable increase of population at Twelve Mile Greek and Sraeken's Gully,"both on the Arrow: and satisfactory report's have reached me from thoss planes, not that'there has been here or elsewhere anything very startling in the way of success, but. good wages at le;i3t are being'mads by many hundreds, and the richest ground is still not iv a condition to bo worked, the necessary .'works' nst being complete.

The latest official report is as follows :— Wakatipu.—Population, 2330/ of which. 770 are miners. Tha V/arueu says : '-The continued fine wea&h r has had ■ tlxs effect of lowering considerably the rivers-of fcbe district, anl strenuous efforts are l»£cg masie by some parties to turn the river Shotover, rha terraces up the Shotover are undenting a good trial, consequent upon the eoar,inu°d protection, of the river claims. News from the Jiead of the Like still continues good, and miner* are steadily holding claims there. Many of the large claims on the Backley Kiver are undsr protection at present." In the last weekly Gold Fields Report from the Wurmen at Wafcattpu. that gentleman" states that _ very fine specimens of copper ore have been brought m. Some from Moke Caark are decidedly the best I have seen.''

The old diggings of Taapaka and Wefherstones continue steadily prosperous. Mr Warden Croker Has furnished to the- Government a detailed statement of the resuit of the operations of ten parti™ of -miners womma: ou the spur at V7 e therston<As. No 1 party coiwatinur of tor men, tlie depth of sinking 20 feet and t,ie depta of wash dirt 5 feet, averaged 2 oz 5 dwt ot gold per man yw week.- Party Ro. 2, of three me,., depth of sinking- <o feet, and 10 feet of wash du\, obfeuueil an average of 1 oz 10 dwt per man per vwek. jno. 3parfcy. ot four men, 10 feet sinking, 2 ieetOi. wasa dirt, obtained 1 oz lOdwt per manner wee* Party No. 4, of four men, 18 feet sinking, and oieet wash dirt, realisrd 3ns per man per week. N». 5, party of four nieu, SO feet sinking and 6 feet ot v/asa oirfc, obtained iaz 5 dwt per man per week. Jno. 6, party of thres men, 25 feet fdnkinff and 5 feef or wash dirt, obtained loz per man >?ei- week. No. 7, party of three men, 30 feet sinking, 2 feet wash dirt, obtained 2oz 15 dwt per man per week. No. 8, party of four mea, 20 feet sinking and 4 feet of wash dirt, obtained loz 15 dwt per man pe.- week. No. 10 party, consisting of five men, 25 feet sinking, 6 feet of wash dir.1-, realised LlO sterliu^ psr week, per man. A very beautiful sample of gold was submitted to our inspection a few days ago. It was bought by Messrs Cohen and L-z'.rd of Queenstowa, and was obtained at Brocklebum Creek, at the head of Lake Wakatip. The parcel weighed about 30 ounce-' and is of a very uuggelty description, the larger portion consutmgof uuggets of from one to four and five ■ -pennyweighTß each. Great hopes are entertained of large 'finds being; in;vde in the neighborhood of Broekleourn Creek during- the ensuing season. Accounts from the Nokomai and Switzer'sdiegincs lead us to expect that these placss will assume greater, importance w tiui-. We may conclude by' remarking th« the gold mining prospects of Otago n.ver were brighter than they are at present, and there is httle douufc of the summer season being'a very brilliant one in mining affairs.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ODT18630918.2.30.6

Bibliographic details

GOLD FIELDS SUMMARY., Otago Daily Times, Issue 547, 18 September 1863, Supplement

Word Count
2,246

GOLD FIELDS SUMMARY. Otago Daily Times, Issue 547, 18 September 1863, Supplement

Working