Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

THE Otago Daily Times. "Inveniam viam aut faciam." DUNEDIN, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26.

In the Provincial Council yes'erday, Returns o • outstanding .^debentures and liabilities were moved , .for by Mr Vogel. laid oa th-3 taTble. •■'■■ Ini reply to questions put by several hon. members, •■'"'."The PiioviH ial Secre'taby "stated that'the widening' of the North East Valley Road at its entrance could not be effected until the ..termination of a lease of land having thres years ix run; that the Government had no intention during the present session of establishing district Education Boards to levy school rates; that no definite official information had yet been received with reference tc the damage done to the water channel, at -rt 7 etherstone's 1 y the breaking away of a dam; that it wenot competent for the Council to pass sir ..ordinance.,.-vesting the municipal estate at Port Chalmers in the hand* of the Town Board; thai instructions had been forwarded to the road en-" gineers to use all -due-precautions in not interfering with miners' claims; that.'the Government were not in a position t") make any definite statement on thr subject of the fiattray and Stuart-street jetties ; that occupiers of Crown lands who had not ex" pendei L 2 an acre on improvements were not entitled to C'-own grants; and (hat ho sum had been put upon the Estimates for..opening a road iYomTokomai iro to the Akatore district, which would not be a main line of road.; , Mr Vogel then moved a resolution, declaring that the Council required a statement,'of the amounts expended and the -revenue received since the end of March last, before proceeding with the .considers f raj of theiEstimates. The hon. member said his object in asking the House lo agree to this motion was to vindicate the privileges -.of- the Council.- The Superintendent had acted properly in undertaking the responsibility of expenditure^under 1 the peculiar circam3fances; but the House should know how the money had.been, spent.before they-w-ere-asked-to vote it : ; ■The Provincial Theastjkg it suspected that the lnotini meant more than appeared on the face of it. He-stated " that, it would b3 impossible to prepare mch a statement as was asked for uadtr several weeks, owing to the state of the public accounts ; .and the result would be a stoppage of the public business. He concluded by laying on the tal )le a return of the cross revenue and expenditure during the interval covered by the motion—the former amounting1 to 1,124,484, and the latter to 1225,371. Mr Brodie could not understand the difficulty stated by the Treasurer. The Pkovikoial Secretary said there was every desire on the part of the Govarament to give the fullest possible information, but he believed it would ■ aofc be practicable'honestly.^ to,prepare such a state- - ment withiu the time during which the Council would sit. If the House insisted on imposing duties on the Government which, it was impossible for them to discharge, if. would. place them in a very embarrasing position, and they wou-d have to consider', what course to: adopt. - It was undesirable unnecessarily to prolong the sittings of the Council, as several of the members had to make preparations to take their seats in the General Assemo.y at Auckland,, which was summoned lor October. Mr Ebnnie thought it better, under the circumstanees,nofc to press the motion, although he contended Uat the House.had a perfect right to the informa- : turn sought for. Mr Yogel denied that the object of his motion was to embarrass the Government. .It appeared to . him to be the imperative duty of the House to innsbupon the returns, '; hanks wove due to those who had ; boldly accepted a. necessary responsibility ; but it wns not to treat the Council as an intelligent bady to a-k them to vote the money required lo.cover the c-xpeu- i - diture without information as to how the inon;>.y had ! been spent. A rat urn somewhat lor.se and gonenil! might satisfy■■ tlu-ir requirements, but that at least! was clue, aiu! he felt bound to press his motion. ! .. . A desultory-.discussion-ensued; several members expressing- their approval of f.he otjejt of t?ie motio:), ' but their doubts aa to the expediency of passing it and the Provincial Secretary intimating tha': if tlie | return was ordered, ifc must devolve upon "some one j , else " to undertake the duty of pi-epar'm? it. » The mover offered to withdraw the motion if tha * Provincial Secretary wou'd lay on the table, as detailed a statement as possible in two days; but the

latter declined to ni.ike any such pledge. Oa the question bc'iig put from the Chair,

The Provincial Secretary asked, "If ths motion was to be taken with the explanation' of the mover." The Si'EiKER replied that li 3 had the simole motion only before him. House then divided. Ayes, 19; Woes) 12 The motion was consequently lest. Captain Baldwin moved for a return of Miners' Eighth anil Business License? issued on the Walcitip 'hiring the first three months after the discovery of that gold iltkl. The Provincial Secretary said it was out. of the power of the Govamment to make such a return ; tut a thorough investigation should be made into the circumstances. Tie motion was negatived on division by 14 votes to 12. ■ Mr Bahi>7 moved for a Se'ect Committee to enquire into the financial conditi m of the colony e=pacHly in connection with the recent transfer of thY«overnsnent .banking account. Mr Vogc-1 seconded the motion, wluc.n, however, was withdrawn, after an explanatory statement from the Provincial Secretary tioS iifiSiSoS^sai; series of resolutimeran 1 pLfef S Bil' ™ a tWrd -Si ci r^ k° Steam., Navigation Bill was read a 3£J and7-epo CrS ered) "* * The Executive Council Amendment Bill was read i second tuna and committed. Clause 4, definin° the institution of the Council, was postponed, in order co discuss the expediency of 'appointing a secretary of Gold field,' as a responsible minister, several other clauses having b,en agreed to, the ii6-^al* n reportßd Progress > and obtained leave to The remaining- business was postponed, and the Council adjourned until to-day. The Ot.ago Provincial Council instead of showing itself, as most legislative bodies do, tenacious of its privileges, seems disposed to He very indifferent to them. The voting of money is, of all the rights such bodies have, the one that. is usually most highly prized, and'as a consequence the spending of money without authorisation the action most narrowly scrutinised. But by. the vote arrived at. last night, the members showed themselves inclined, to sanction not only the practice but the principle, of spending money without authority for the same first being derived from the only source legally entitled to give it Owing to the impossibility of holding a meeting of the Council at the time .when the financial votes of the last Council" expired, the necessity was forced on the Superintendent ql .expending money without authority. He did not shrink from the responsibility, but committed himself to an expenditure which, in the aggregate, is stated to amount to £224,000. tn his opening address to the Council-he very properly alluded to the fact, and added, "you ;' will be asked to sanction the necessary idis!l bursements which I have, under unusual •' circumstances, authorised." This was all right enough; and it would seem'■.-to have followed, as a matter of course, that i statement would be laid before, the (.he Council giving an account of the unauthorised expenditure. Some suspicion having insen, that instead of. adopting this course, it was proposed to include the unauthorised expenditure in the amounts to be authorised in die general estimates, a member moved last aight, that the Council required to see a siate:nent of what was already expended before proceeding into Committee of Supply. The resolution was negatived on division. For the credit of the good sense of the House, it is to be hoped the members voted less from conviction than from the desire to avoid bringing about i ministerial crisis. The Provincial Secretary, with an astonishing amount of ill temper kerned disposed to make it a ministerial mestion. That it was not entitled to such a character there can be no doubt, but probably che desire not to precipitate a crisis induced :nariy members to overlook the ill temper and vote against their convictions. It is a pity: they disregarded the constitutional aspect of the matter. There is a wide distinction between voting amounts yet to be expended and granting an indemnity for unauthorised expenditure. The argunents used by the members of the Groyernmenfc in opposing the resolution cold rather against themselves. They did not ieny that as a principle the House was justified in requiring the statement, but they argedthe difficulty of its preparation as areaton for not granting it. In pther words, this is but to say—because the unauthorised expenditure has attained enormous proportions, mi a list of the items would be a long one therefore the Council should forego requiring an explanation which it would be fully entitled to ask if its privileges had been violated in a lesser degree. The fgreater the offence the less urgent the expiation, is the deduction from the curious argument with which the Executive sought to bamboozle the Council. The reasons -why the return would be so difficult to grant were »iven in a most unsatisfactory manner. The mover of the resolution professed himself ready to be indulgent to a statement in which the classification might not be very exact. But the members of the Executive held out no hopes of anything in the nature of a distinct account of the unauthorised expenditure. It is difficult to understand in what manner the accounts have been kept | that are found so difficult of reduction. The Provincial Secretary stated that the items were flying about subsidary books waiting for classification before posting. But if such be the case, we can only say that the accountant has very inadequately performed his duty. He should have opened an tmauthorised expenditure account, and classified the several items under convenient headings, But to leave the accounts unposted until the estimates are passed, and then to commence a sort of retrospective book-keeping, are surely modes 6f practice equally unusual and dangerous when the large amount dealt with comes to be considered. We assert most unj equivocally that if the accounts have been i properly kept, the return asked for could be prepared in a couple of days. The Provincial Secretary held out hopes that as the Estimates progressed, he would be able to indicate ' i what amounts were already expended. But |if he can do this, what difficulty can there be |in giving a detailed statement which members tmay be enabled to examine in advance? . 1 In considering the 'sanctioning of unauthorised expenditure, the Council will have; less to take in regard the policy of the same,than whether the Superintendent should be indemnified for incurring it. Take, for instance, au amount notoriously expended, £500 for the Prince of Wales' Marriage Celebration.

It would be in ill taste for any member to make objections iv regard to it, supposing he were disposed "so to do, unless he meant to take the extreme course of opposing it, and so throw the expense upon the Superintendent personally. Nothing is more undesirable than to place the Council in direct conflict with the chief administrative officer; and yet this would be the case if the Council disallowed expenditure he has authorised. But how are the members to avoid objecting to the unauthorised amounts unless they are told what they are? —and if the Government are able to do this, why not furnish the statement requested? It is true they can do this—they can hold over the heads of members the fear of repudiating expenditure already incurred, as an inducement for carrying any vote they desire. No opportunity will be afforded of dividing the unexpended from the expended, and the estimates will be forced through more as an Indemnity than an Appropriation Act. We dread to conjecture what will be the effect on the reputation of the Province, when it becomes known that the Council is so indifferent to the particulars of the unauthorised expenditure of such an enormous sum as a quarler of | a million. Of one tiling it is likely to convince ! the General Government—the impolicy of I granting the control of large loans to men who show themselves so little acquainted with the forms of constitutional government. Last night the Council was made acquainted with one tissue of unconstitutional proceedings. The immense overdraft at the Bank, the refusal to give security, the keeping the accounts in such a manner that the unauthorised items cannds readily be arrived at, the desire to make an Appropriation serve the purpose oi j an Indemnity Act, the merging loans for i public works into the ordinary revenue, are all of a piece—thoroughly indicative ot utter ignorance of the management of financial affairs. " The Land Resolutions laid on the table by the Executive, if not very sound, arenot deficient in .plausibility. They contain several disjointed which it is stated are variously favored by different members of the Executive. As they stand as a whole, they have not the support of thore who introduce them, but each member of the Government ha 3 his own pet portion, and by a species of compromise their various ideas are associated ' together, with no one pledged to support them. It is not worth while here to consider whether on so important-a question as that of the sale of public lands the Council has not the right to require a Ministry at-one. It is foliy to say that four men could not be found holding similar ideas on the subject. It would have been more candid of the Ministry to have r stated; that circumstances other than, and superior to, political, rendere.l r it necessary for them to coalesce as an Executive. But, putting this on one side, the Council must not be deceived by the specious form in which the resolutions are laid before them. Although members are asked to consider them separately, it is necessary they should first regard them as a whole. The policy which the resolutions in their entirety embody is briefly told. The sale of land by public auction at £2 per acre; the restricting the declaration of Hundreds; the taxing unimproved lands; the introducing a system of Government leasing—these are the broad features which the resolutions actually propose, al-1 though some of their purposes are disguised. ;, The pretence of free selection is a hollow sham. The fifth clause, provides that when any two persons apply for land, declared open for sale, the same shall ba put lip to public auction. It will be readily apparent, as the applicant is under no bond to purchase, that by this clause rural lands will be invariably sold by public auction. We are expressing no opinion as to the policy of such a practice, but we do protest against the dishonesty of attempting to entrap members into the belief that free selection is in any shape contemplated by the resolutions. Number eight is a still more dishonest clause. By a side wind it expresses an opinion of the unsuitableness of certain Hundreds recommended by the late Council; and then goes on to draw a deduction thorougly insequential. We will not discuss the suitableness of the Hundreds in question, but the reference to them is , quite out of place, and when it is considered that some of the members of the Council are notoriously interested in them, the flagrant nature of the unnecessary allusion may ; be readily comprehended. It is sufficient to add, that the dignity of the House requires the summary rejection.of the clause in its present shape. If the adaptability of the Hundreds referred to requires discussion.; let it come on in proper shape.. The resolutions tabled by Mr John Cargill favorably-contrast with those of the Governj ment for their honesty and candour. There is I no mistake or ambiguity about their meaning. In discussing them, members will know what they are considering. Our present limits will not permit our reviewing the policy which the resolutions of either Mr Cargill or the Government enunciate. In our Summary for Melbourne yesterday, the name of Mr H. G. Walker, instead of Mr H. J. Miller, was given to the Minister of Public Works. An inquest was held before Dr. Samuels, Coroner of Gold Fields, on Friday, the 14th inst., at the Bridge Inn Hotel, Waitahuna, oh the body of an infant daughter of Mr H. Ditart, who was torn under somewhat peculiar circumstances on the 14th inst. After hearing the evidence of Mrs Woual, Mrs Hiekie, Dr Nahey, and Mr Ditart, the father of the deceased infant, the following verdict was returned, by the jury :—" That the infant was still-born •," and a rider was added exonerating any person from blame in the matter. The cases brought before the Resident Magistrate yesterday, were merely trivial offences against the Town and Country Police Ordinances. No civil business whatever was transacted, and the only criminal charge was dismissed, as no prosecutor appeared. Wo learn from the Dunstan that Captain" Anderson arrived there on Saturday, and at once commenced his recruiting campaign with every prospect of succeeding in the object of his Visit. '

The visit to Dunedin of the Rev. W. Pooled of Melbourne, who officiated at two services in town on Sunday, has resulted in a determination to form a Baptist Church on open communion principlesA meeting of members of the Baptist denomination was held on Monday evening at Mr Gray's rooms, Eattray street, when a resolution to that effect was unanimously adopted, and the necessary preliminary steps taken.

The Gold Fields Wardens' Reports for the weekending the 15fch instant, continue the stery of partially suspended operations through the heavy snow falls, and in some places a- partial thaw. We regret to add that they lend confirmation to the accounts that have reached us from various quarters of accident, suffering, and loss of life occasioned by the extreme severity of the weather. We copy from these reports the following particulars :—Gabriel's.—Population 1800, of whom 1100 are miners. The Warden says—The weathor during the last week has been most unfavourable for out-door pursuits. Waitahuna.— Population 1028, of whom 808 are miners. The Warden reports :—Snow has fallen during the major portion of the week. On Thursday it lay on the ground to the depth of about a foot to eighteen inches. A thaw set in, however, yesterday, and to-day the snow lias almost disappeared from the hills, causinquite a flood iv the gully, thereby filling the i claims with water, and greatly retarding mininoperations. This severe weather will, I a m afraid, tell seriously on our next escort, but will have a good effect eventually, as water, I should imagine, will not be scarce for some time to come, the ground having been thoroughly saturated. The contractor for the road is goin* on with the work as fast as the weather will allow, anil it will be a great boon to the district when it is completed. Mouut Benger.-Population, 950 of whom 700 are miners. We copy the Warden's report in extenso. Pie writes—All the week the weather has been stormy, with violent cold winds, and a consequent fail of snow. On the flats the snow lay only for a few hours at a time but on the hills it has accumulated to such an extent as to render travelling not only laborious but extremely dangerous. The post from Dunedin, due on -Wednesday, did not arrive until! Saturday, ..when, it transpired that the post rider had been lost on the ranges, between Tuapeka and Gardiner's station, and had been out all nightin the snow on the hills. When he reached Gardiner's he was frostbitten and unable to proceed. - On Monday a man was reported to be missing between German Jock's Gnlly-and the Teviot. He had then been absent eight days. On Friday a man named Robert Hendry was found in an exhausted condition on the high range between this place and the Pomahaka diggings. He was only about 400 yards off the track when found, and was then, able to. cooey to some men who were on their, way to.the Teviot. The m<;n who found him gave him a little' bread and tried to get him along/.but he soon became 'too weak to walk, and two of them, named John Cusack alid Lindsay Hunguenin, carried him a considerable distance on their backs. Before reaching the Teviot they were obliged to stop arid lay down their burden, and v?ait for assistance which had been sent for, but iv a few minutes the man expired. He had. been two days out, with no nourishment but a single piece of bread, and no shelter or cover but the fly of a; calico tent. Another man is reported to have been killed at the Pomahaka bya small avalanche. Thd snow shifted on the side of the hill, where he was tented, and covered him up. His mate escaped up the chimney, but was badly burnt and nearly smothered. Work has : for the last few days been.quite suspended in consequence of the severity of the weather. The Eiver Clutha has' been steadily falling at the rate of about 12 inches a-day; and is npw within seven or eight feet of its former lowest level of this season. On some of the beaches work has been resumed. A cheering sigu of the faith of a car-:! tain portion of the mining community in the permanency of the gold workings in this district, is to be found in the fact that the number of applications for residence areas has largely increased of late. Dunstan.—-Population 2400, of whom 2000 are. miners. The Warden writes: — The Molyneux, during the whole of the week has been slowly ebbing) and at the latter end some of the beach claims were again worked by their owners. From the small number of protection tickets taken put* it is evident that many of these claims have been j abandoned. One of the very best on the "Prospectors' Beach," which has been shepherded ! since October last has been given up, the owners, considering that no opportunity of working the ground successfully will be afforded this season. The Lignite bed has been again opened by the lessee by means of a shaft, and in a day or two the public will be amply supplied with fuel. The snow seems to be permanently settled on the Carrick ranges, the Dunstan and all the higher ground, and distressing accounts of lost and frost-bitten men have been received from the outlying gullies in these localities. A public meeting to consider the best steps to relieve and assist the unfortunates, has been held at Manuherikia. . Wakatip.—Population 2300,' of whom 1880 are miners. The Warden reports : —The weather has been more settled during the past week, and the river, though still high, bids fair to be soon at a level which will allow of mining operations being recommenced, as far as the river claims are concerned. Many of the ; holders of the ab»ve-inentioned class of claims are engaged in terrace workings, their claims being under protection. Some have proceeded to the head of the Lake with a view of setting in for a time at Ferris' Creek and the Buckler's Burn, leaving as the condition of their protection ticket one or more of their mates in charge of their claims during their absence. By far the greater number, however, are at work in the immediate vicinity of their claims. The owners of the race known as Arthur's, have already put in an application to construct a race on the opposite bank or beach of the river to their old one, which has been completely destroyed by the late floods, after having cost a sum exceeding L7OOO. They are now contemplating the construction of one equally expensive, but which will, I believe, from its proposed course, be more efficient, than the old one. 'The-debris washed down the river by the flood is affording remunerative employment to great: numbers of miners who are engaged in cradling, earning, I believe, fair wages. The road to Maori Point is progressing, and when finished will considerably, shorten the mileage. Its prosecution is especially beneficial to the district at the present time, as it affords employment to a number of men whose claims are still unworkable. The road from Queenstown to Arthur's Point is also in course of formation.

At a meeting held in the Schoolroom, Anderson's Bay, on the 24th instant, the following gentlemen were elected to be members of the District Board of Road Trustees, viz :—William Braid, John M'Neill, David Wilson, James Lothian, James Brown, Archibald M'Kay, Stewarfc,_Lecki v Peter MTavish.

The Princess Theatre was again completely filled in every part of .the house last night, by a most enthusiastic audience. The Minstrels repeated their programme of Monday night, which is again announced for repetition this evening. The Lancashire "Bell-Ringers were anionst the passengers to Melbourne by the Edina yesterday. A hope was very generally entertained that they would have given a repetition of their entertainment; at the Oddfellows' Hall, before they finally left Dunedin. We are compelled to hold over our report of the Town Board until to-morrow. One of the old English Universities has amongst its other institutions a "Trayelling Bachelorship." The munificent supporters ot the Sydney University seem desirous of establishing a similar foundation in New South Wales. We take the following from the report of the Senate of the Sydney University, 1863 :—" Mr Thomas Sutcliffe Mort has signified his intention to place at the disposal of the Senate, the sum of 300 guineas, to be awarded on Commemoration Day, 1865, to the graduate of the-University of - Sydney, who shall be declared to have attained the highest honors in this University in the course of his academic career. The sum to be expended in visiting England, and if possible, the ' continent of Europe. The recipient is bound on his return to present to the University, to be" placed amongst the archives, a history of his--tour, with a special reference to the assthetical."or "- mechanical and engineering arts," A sum 0fL445 being the surplus of the fund subscribed for his' statue, and placed at his disposal by the subscribers, has also been presented by Mr W. C. Wentworth ior the foundation of a fellowship^ The sum is to be invested until the amount shall be sufficient to found a travelling fellowship, " the holder to travel for three years in England and on the continent of Europe, and to present on his return a narrative of his tour, with remarks on the subjects of literary and scientific interest, to which his observation may have been directed." A memorial,on the subject of Harbor and Land extension at Port Chalmers, has been extensively signed in the Port and its neighborhood, with the r view of being presented to the Provincial Council^L The memorial states that the position which PorF'^ Chalmers has attamed^-as-ithe chief 'maritime port of New Zealand,:and as,the third shipping port in the-South Pacific—has attracted'th'e notice^ of capitalists andothers, who are desirous of em. barking in 'operations for. the building and repairing of ships, and' the; "establishment of manufactures , and : other industrial undertakings incidental ;to a;great shipping port.,. That, the Jimitefl area of. the; town, rand lihe*-:l'. hilly riaiure^of ; the;land r adjacent/ 'greatly' tend to prevent sncli establishments, unless at a: cost which for all practical purposes must prohibit them upon a scale commensurate with that field for enterprise which the rapilprogressof theport-- - holds forth. That the difficulty referred to may be overcome by reclaiming from the ..harbor the whole of the estuary adjoining the town, known as Mussel Bay, which seems adapted by nature expressly to meet the case, and which it is believed could be reclaimed at'a comparatively moderate outlay, which, in proportion/to the laud reclaimed, would be a mere trifle as compared "with the cost of reclamation. "That the land so reclaimed would afford both wet.; and; dry docks, ship-building yards, sites for manufactories, and warehouses, and cannot failto realise an amount far in excess of thecost of reclamation. That the sum expended in reclaiming said estuary would afford extensive means of employment of labor, eminently reproductive, without of necessity in- - volving any demand upon the public chest. That while the memorialists have reason to know that there are individuals who are prepared ta contract for the work now intended, on condition of their becoming absolute owners of the land reclaimed it is certain that .the works can be done on terms' much more advantageous for the public, and so as to procure a handsome endowment for municipal purposes. That while the memorialists deprecate the appearance of dictating, as to the precise modus operandi by which improvements now sought may be effected, they trust they- may.be .. pardoned for suggesting the following plan which they do with all deference, viz. :—Having satisfied itself that the work will be a reproductive one, let the Government advance temporarily the sum required out of the half million Provincial Loan, or let it raise a special loan, the advance to bo made either to commissioners, appointed for' ■ the purpose, or to the Port Chalmers Town Board, the Government retaining the first claim on the land until the loan shall have been repaid with interest; thereafter the proceeds of ,the estate to be administered as prescribed by the Legislature for the municipal purposes of Port Chalmers.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ODT18630826.2.8

Bibliographic details

THE Otago Daily Times. "Inveniam viam aut faciam." DUNEDIN, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26., Otago Daily Times, Issue 525, 26 August 1863

Word Count
4,920

THE Otago Daily Times. "Inveniam viam aut faciam." DUNEDIN, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26. Otago Daily Times, Issue 525, 26 August 1863

Working