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THE DUNSTAN.

, (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.) Dunstan, 24th. August. In mining matters there is very little to report, the late severe weather having, with the exception of the river, caused a temporary suspension of work in all other quarters. These last few days the weather has been very mild and genial,'and a number of men have in consequence both gone out and come in from the mountainous districts to look after their mates and friends. The Molyneux has not gon- down any this day or so. A partial thaw having sent in we all dreaded' another flood, hutsuch has not been the care. At the present time there are great hopes that the miners will yet be enabled to reach some of the hidden treasurfs lying in its bed. Many parties are now looking.after their claims which they have registered, almost despairing of ever visiting them again; in many cases they are already occupied by others, and Bhould the beaches become workable, the amount of disputes for the Wardens to settle are beyond all coneption. Public attention is now much diverted towards the Teliefof.the suflerers by the late snow storm, every available bed in the Hospital being occupied, besides •which accommodation outside has been provided. The medical gentlemen have behaved with great magnanimity towards the sufferers, giving' pr f&sional attendance and medicines free. It is earnestly to be hoped that such another calamity will never visit us again, or at all events that we may bo better prepare i to meet it j at thesametiine it will be a warning to the miners not to place themselves during the winter months in too exposed situations. In many cases, necessity has been the cause of their doing so, many getting so reduced in circumstances by shepherding for so lone: a time on the river,. were compelled to betake themselves, at all risks, to localities where they could make sure of getting a little gold; and being necessarily short of funds, were not properly prepared to meet the rigours of the climate. In no case that I know of has their sufferings been as many suppose, through "foolhardiness; but dire;necessity has Been the cause. What some of the miners have gone through no tongue can tell, or pen explain ; never was more heroic fortitude and courage displayed than has teen on the occasion of the late stora;—all that man could do to bear up unforseen disaster has been done ; and if what many of the miners of Otago have gone through this -winter does not stamp them as one of the bravest and most enterprising communities in the world, I do not know what should. Rowley's relief party returned on Wednesday' evening fronv their expedition to the Deep Creek; the ..parties they werein search of, had been extricated, ~ but weresuffering much from the effects of frost-bite. Shortly after their return, a public meeting was called to receive a report of their proceedings, of which the following is a copy : — "To the-Gentlemen of the Dunstan Relief Committee. ; . " Sirs,-r-I beg to lay before you an account of our proceedings, expenses, <fie. '_■■-. " After leaving the Dunstan, and when about four miles on the road, we lost the party in charge of the medicines; we made a strict search, but he could not be found; so deeming it expedient not to proceed without them, I returned to the Dunstan for another supply, upon obtaining which we recommenced our journey. On Tuesday mornieg,' at ca^light, -we reached MTherson's station. After partakin°- of some refreshment and feeding our horses, we started again with as little delay as possible, arriving at the Deep Stream about 11 a m ; we then received in-formation-thair-a-digger had made his way through -the snow,-and rescued the people. Hearing that a digger was lying in a tent irost-bitten, I immediately forwarded him some of the medicines. Two others were lyine: at the Deep Stream very badly bitten about the feet and hands, and who were trying to get a conveyance to reach the Dunstan. I endeavored to get them a seat in the coach, but failed, so I hired a dray and forwarded them on after making them as j comfortable as possible. At M'Pherscn's I purchased bread, meat, tea, sugar, &c, and divided it among the mates of the men I forwaided to the Dunstan, and who were very hard up; I also gave them cash to the amount of. three pounds. After relieving all that required assistance we retraced our steps towards the Dunstan, where we arrived about 4 p.m. the next day. Mr Rowley made a statement to the effect that upon asking Miles, ths driver of .Cobb's coach, to give one of the men a seat, he indignantly refused, although offered tLe sum of £o to do so, and o«e of the passengers also volunteered to vacate his seat, so that the sick man might ride, but on no terms whatever wpuld the driver take one of the men, who ended "by saying that " He didn't care whether he lived or not, he should not ride in the coach. lt This statement so incensed the meeting that a vote of censure was unanimously passsd upon Mr Miles. From what I could heai' of the case, it appears that the coach being four days behind time, and haviag a very heavy mul beside a great weight of papers, the driver considered that with the present state of the roads, which was such that all the passengers were often compelled to get out and unloose the horses, and finally lift the coach out of its difficulties, that Mr Miles could not do without the help of his passengers, and certainly ■was unable to carry a sick man, as he could not calculate one moment from, the other when the vehicle

might, capsiz-?, it having don1 so twice a'reaiy o'l th journey. Three okaers wero then given for Mr. liowley, a vote of (.hanks to Pr Shaw for services rendered, also smother for the worthy chairman, Mr •Skinner, oftiivi 13.ink of New Zealand, and the meeting separated.

The two inon forwarded on by the relief party arrived aL ttie Dunstm Hospital about noon on Thursday last; their hands slightly but their feet were linioh but-in—the right foot of one of ilieiu was one mass of putridity from the to^s to the ancle, and will most likely have to lose his leg As they both sa!: in the dray the stench from theiv wounds was positively sickening', no one could credit without seeing; it tlr.it frost bits was so serious an affair It is precisely t.lio same as a .scald (although not done with heat). " You do not at first know that you have bam bitten beyond a slight numbness —a small b'.aek patch like that >u'oduced by a pinch comes at the very 'extremity of the fiogtrsu: toes, which soon spreads all over the ham's or feat, accompanied with si great swellies The points tii-.>n buret under the nails aad bleed very much, '.he nails coming right away; in fact, all the fleih. actually rots off the member affected. This is of course the worst description' of cisc, but in the best it is anything but a light affair—s^-ms that I saw brought iv, their extremities were quite black, while in ethers they were the very opposite, looking as if the part had been boiled. It does not appear to affect the horses, only in places where the skin might have been rubbed off by the harness of the pack; saddles. Some of the poor animals are in a deplorable state when the cruppers or bnast straps have chafed off the skin. MA.SUHERIKIA. The delegates sent down to present the petition to the Superintendent, respecting the leasing- the ferries business, arrived back on Saturday night. A public meeting- will be called this evening, for the purpose of hearing them give "an account of their stewardship." Along the banks of the Manuherikia river a large number of miners are at work, many doing remarkably well. At the Maniburn Flat about 100 men are engaged; all, according to their own account, making wages. The whole number of people having claims here are engaged cutting a tail nice into the river, so as to lower the water in the claims on the bank. From the outljing districts the news is very encouraging ; everything looks considering the season of the year, as wed as can be expected. Great hopes are entertained that the coming spring will be a very prosperous one. Taking mining matters in the aggregate, they have much improved lately, although., noiie are making " piles" you do not hear many complaints. An inquest was held by Jackson Kedlell, Esq, It. M, at the Gorge, on the road to Campbell's, on the body of a man named John '•'enfold, who died through exposure to cold on the Old Man flange, aboat the 12th or 13th instant. Simco'e. David Edgar, sworn, said: Am a miner living at Campbell's Creek. I know the deceased ; he was my mate for about four 'months until the 12th instant, when he left our party to goto the Deep Greek Gorge, to reach which he had to pass over the Carrick Ranges, which were covered with snow. At the time he left he was in company with another man; he was perfectly sober when he left Campbell's Creek. A heavy snow storm came on about an hour after his leaving. A number of other miners had also left the Creek that morning. A short time after deceased left, a man came to our claim and reported that he had seen deceased and the other man; they were walking as quickiy as possible to overtake others in front of them. On the 17th instant, I heard that deceased had been found dead on the Ranges. I came over to the Deep Creek Gorge, and there saw the dead body of deceased. He (the deceased) had, the day before he left, about seven ounces of gold and some sovereigns in a chamois leather bag. I think he must have taken it with him, but I did not see ir. The morning he started he also had three pounds in notes. I have since seen the man who accompauiea the deceased, he is now lying in a very dangerous state from frost bite incurred in his juurney over the range in' company with the deceased; he is now at the Commercial Dining Rooms, Manuherikia. The deceased was a native of London. He told me his name was John Penibld, but his miner's right was taken out in the name of Thomas Peufold; ha was a single man. Thomas Burron being sworn, said : I am a packer oh the road between Manuherikia and Campbell's Creek. I have seen the deceased. On Sunday last, as I was coming from Campbell's Creek ia company with about 30 or 40 other men, and about a mile this side of the summit of the ranges,-1 found the body of deceased;'it'was cold and stiff, lyinp;on its back, "ne leg was crossed over the other. His monkey jacket was lying by his side, almost wederntath the triangular mark erected to direct persons through the snow. I did not know him before it was proposed by some of the people to search his pockets to see who he was. I searched' the deceased. In the left trowsers pocket I found a miner's right in «he name of Thomas Penfold, three one-pound notes, eight-shillings and sixpence in silver, and a knife; these I have handed over to the police. I gave the information to s.ime police I met on the' road in search after him, they having been informed of his death by some other persons; I found no gold or leathern bag < n deceased. I could not say whether the deceased had been searched before or not. I was about the last of the large paity who were on the road at the time. Decea-ed's face was .covered with snow, but his body was not. He" was lying partly on his left side. I could get my hand easily into his right-hand trowsers pockei. There was nothing in it. The money and the knife were in the left. George Gaynor sworn, said: lam a constable of police, stationed at Manuherikia. On Sunday night I received information that the dead body of a man was lying on tve Carrick ranges, on the track between the Gorge and Campbell's. I proceeded thither on Monday and found the body. I received from the previous witness the amount of money stated in his evidence. John Lord, M.D., sworn :Am a duly qualified medical practitioner, living at the Maaunerikia. I made a post mortem examination of the body of deceased. Externfilly I found no marks of violence. On opening the skull I found the brain congested with venous blood; and on opening the chest I found loth lungs congested The heart was quite gorged with venous blood. From these symptoms lam of opinion that the cause of death was, first, congestion of the brain, and ultimate stoppage in the action of the heart from engorgement and consequent congestion or the lungs. Exposure to severe cold wculd cause these indications; and lam of opinion deceased died from such exposure The stomach was collapsed and empty. Verdict accordingly. Mr Keddell held another iuquest on Saturday, at M'Pherson's station, on the body of a man who died from exposu- c near the Hough Sidge. Another expired at Jacks', Criterion Hotel, from the effects of the same. 1 append the. following report from Mr Davis, the Secretary of the Manuherikia Relief Committee :— " Manuherikia Helief Coinittee, " Since the formation of this committee on Monday morning, eleven cases of suffering, through exposure in the snow, have been put under its care; of these two have been removed to the hospital. Two dismissed, cured; and one died, leading six still on the hands of the committee, ali of which are progressing favorably, jit a meeting of committee, held on Tuesday evening, to receive the report of the volunteers, Messrs Jacks, Dods and Kennedy, who, accompanied by Mr Hail, had gone out to ths Gorge on Monday, to learn if they could be of any service to their suffering feliow miners. They stated.that few more would be expected, as those only who had been on the range during the storm, had suffered; but that they had left instructions at the Gorge for all cases to be attended to. A hearty vote of thanks was passed to Mr Hall, for jj accompanying and sending assistance to the yolune teers. The Secretary, Mr Bavies, reported having relj cciv..-d a letter, from Mr Ked.-iell, stating his inability a to promise on behalf of the Government that the fund y i'lised would bs supplemented; but that he had s placed himself in communication with the G-overn-n ment on the subject, jr The Treasurer, Mr J. Dods, reported that the sum ' t l of £64 had been collected, which was considered j highly creditable to the township. lg The Secretary reported that the medical gentleman ._ of tiie township had offered in the most handsome j t manner, their gratuitous services, only charging for ie the needful meiicines. This liberal offer was grate- , e fully accepted. , r A vote of thanks to the Chairman closed the pro- , v ceedings. it G. Davis, Secretary. « it THE- ALLEGED INHUMANITY TO THE ;o FBO&T-BITTEN. 1. (To the Editor of the Daily Times.) Jf Sir—At a meeting held last Wednesday evening, >o at the Union Hotel, Hartley-street, I was charged by ' t- Mr llowley, .the leader of a relief party, with, in a d most unbecoming and cruel manner, refusing to take »r up in the coach, for conveyance to the Dunstan, a it man who was lying badly frostbitten near M'Pher- j is son's station, resulting in a vote of censure bsing I passed upon me at the meeting in question duriDg my g aiisence, thereby giving me no opportunity to refute il the slanderous accusation. Having no other means d of setting myself right with the public than through ••a the columns of your journal, I give the following, 'O which is an exact statement of the facts as they were, c and leave the rest for the people to judg'% as to whe>t ther I acted in the inhuman manner as described by y my foul calumniator; nor do I know of any instance, !•• as the general public can testify, that either here o or in Victoria has the firm which I have the'

honor to re|) rGse»t, been in any shape whatever guilty of refusing aid to persona requiring' their assistance on the rosd, but on the contrary t can with the utmost confidence state that whenever tic i) has been nee '.el, (without asking) Cole, lioyt and Co. have always promptly rendered it. The parficulais are as fo'lows : — When passing a. shantysome few iniicsfrom M'Pherson's station, I was accosted by Mr Kowley and some oth»r parties who in a most ostentatious manner demanded seals in tlie coach for two man, the coach being a small one, and full of passengers besides. I ha! a double mail and a largo amount of newspapers. I told them that I o'iuld not make any addition to my load, and the state of the roads was such that I could not be sure of reaching the Duns tan that night; basides it was offeniiines necessary for aii the passengers to get out aud either fairly lit or dig the coach out of the numerous "bugs" into which we were constantly sticking; so th.it to be hampered with, sick men in p' ace of my able-bodied ones I could not nroeeed at all.

hai already that day had two capsizes, and scarcely new one moment from the other when should meet with another. They then asked le to take one of the men, offering to aid some of their -party to accompany me ut not considering them as being exactly the men on •horn I could depend upon for assistance in the hour f neeJ, I was again compelled to decline, at the same ma showing them a waggon that wou'.d take men n to the Dunstan in a" much more comfortable lanner than I could, and if that did not suit, it r-as better to leave them where they were till assistnce could be sent for from the Dunstan, which I ffered to procure immediately 1 got in. I was then .ssailed by llowley and his party in lan»u<g3 anyhing but gentlemanly, and some recriminatory renarks were made on both sides, and, considering rom my long experience on the roads, that I undertood the requirements of the case better than Mr lowley, I adopted my own course, which afterwards proved the right one. Trusting', Mr Editor, that I have not taken up too much of your space in thus vindicating the Jhavacter, I may say of a " public servant." I am &c, James Miles. Dansfan, August 24th, 1863.

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Bibliographic details

THE DUNSTAN., Otago Daily Times, Issue 525, 26 August 1863

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THE DUNSTAN. Otago Daily Times, Issue 525, 26 August 1863

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