Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

SUMMARY

FOR MELBOUE N.-E, BY S.S. EDINA. Since the date of our Summary for England published on the 18:H instant, we have received no actional intelligence of any importance from the seat of war. Tne pivcess of recraitinsj for the Taranaki Militia and the Wel'-ington Colonial Defence Force, has progressed actively. The former especially jis a popular service, owing to the inducement held out by the Colonial Government of grants of land to military settlers. Captain Anderson has been appointed as Recruiting Officer for the province, aaei he is now on a tour on the gold fields, enrolling men. The facility with which recruits have been:obtaiued' is to a considerable extent a consequence of the «re?t hindrance that has been effered to mining operations by the floods and snows, which have almost led to a suspension of operations on many of bur principal gold jfiekls. Th-'re is indeed a class always to be found in every community to-whom military life has its peculiar attractions ; ahd it is not surprising tbat the oiler of a town and a farm allotment in freehold in a fertile district of the colony,. as reward for thre« years* liability to military service, should proverirressistilile to many of our active-and adventurous young men; The result may be a slight and temporary dcaihupon our population ; but everything proaiises such rich returns from our gold fields, with the cessation of the present Alpine weather, that we look forward with confidence fo a great influx of population! during the spring months. ' * The escort returns have been well sustained, considering the very heavy drawback to whic.i all mining pursuits have been subjected. The weekly reports o^f the Gold Fields' Wardens, speak of several new discoveries and rushes, which show the wids diffusion ofthe precious metal, although a change of weather is abiQlutely necessary to enable any great results to be realised. One new gold field has been developed, and proclaimed under the designation of the Mount Ida Gold Field, It is more familiarly known, however as tbe Hogburn, and is situated in the neighborhood ot the Highlay diggings, which were discovered about' twelvemonths ago. At tbe date of our Summary, the: population on this gold field was estimated at upwards of 5000, and every day witnessing new and large accessions. We reported the field then not to be a very rich one, the ear-rings not being above an Average of from ten to thirty shillings a-day. The extent of aur ferous ground was known, however, to be large ; and it was situated at an easy distance from' town, comparatively speaking; was accessible by fair roads, and possessed available scrub for fuel. There appeared a probability that an increasing population would gather on the spot and contribute a lar^e amount to the general gold receipts of the Province. These expectations seems to be in course-of being rapidly realised. Ths latest letter from our correspondent at the Hogburc, dated Tuesday last, August 18th, says:—These diggings ' still continue steadily to go ahead, and. new ground ha' been opened in -almost every direction, while the old. workings fully, maintain their refutation. On the Eweburu Creek, and in a gully adjoining it, a considerable number are at work, aud the prospects obtained in them are about the same as those on the Hogburn. Several new* places of business have also been put up. The Bank of New Zealand, the Union, and the Bank of New South Wales, have opened agencies here, and prove a great convenience to the public.^ Ah escort asd postal communication are how the two things most urgently needed. Surely the route of the Dunstan. escort could be altered without entailing much expe&se. This is by far the better road e-f fhe two, and there is abundance ot accommodation for both men ahd horses a'.bng the whole line. With regard to postal communication, there is at present a weekly mat from Dunedin to the Dunstan, wm Waikouaiti, which passes within ten miles of the Hogburn, -and there should certain ly be little diffictiltyin making it available for tliat place. A new company, consisting of ten members, has been started under the title of the " Mount Ida Water Company," for the purpose of bringing another race of water into the workings. . They have obtained the nece?sary grant, and a surveyor is now at word taking the levels. The estimated cost is LISOO. The "Enterprise" Cjnipjmy is also pushing a-head vigorously, but some considerable time must still elapse before the work is completed. Reports are current of new rushes in several directions, but, with one exception, I caunot tivice them to any reliable source. The one to which f refer is situate iv the gorge of the Manuherikia, about twelve miles from here, anil, - I believe, on Saxton's run. The Waikouaiti road runs within four miles of it, and it is easily found hy keeping straight on through the gore, instead of following the road down Blackstone Hill For this a considerable number have started to-day, and tho accounts from it are of the most glowing character. The average yield is reported to be B.}dwt to the tin dish— gold coarse, deptli of sinking.two to five feet; and average depth of wash-dirt twenty inches. I know that lor a considerable length of time a . few parties' have been working in that locality, and that.some coarse' $old was got out. Whether it will prove a remunerative field for a large population has yet to he ascertained." [ We have mentioned the state of the weather as seriously interfering with mining pursuits. The floods on the Molyneux and other rivers have entirely suspended the working of river claims for months past, and the heavy snow storms that have prevaileel for the past few weeks have rendered mining operations, in many directions, almost impracticable. In 6ur summary foi- England we adverted to the great loss of property and oflife that had been occasioned by the floods and landslips consequent on tbem. We mentioned also that an official report had just been received communicating intelligence, which however required to be confirmed, of the loss of forty lives by the fallins of an avalanche of snow at Separation Creek. We are happy to say that that rumor ha? been found to be without adequate foundation,, although the peril to which a large party of industrious men were exposed, will be seen from a subsequent report made to the government, the subsiance of which we sub ; oin: -•' A police constable preceded to Separation Creek, situate about ten miles west of the Black Ball Hotel, tor the purpose of investigating the report, that on the night of the Hth several lives had been there lost in a snow storm. The constabe, in company with four other men, arrived at the place at noon on Monday, the 17th instant, and fouud that there had not b.:en any lives lost, but that the miners there, uumbeiing fifty, were suf.tring severely from tha want of provisions, having had to subsist on tea for three days. The packers who usually supplied them had lost their horses, aud the nearest place from whence provisions could be obtained (the Black Ball Hotel), it was impassible to reach in consequence of the snow. Two men who attempted it had to remain out all night. The tents, numbering about twelve, had been erected against a high bank, the snowdrift covering them to a depth of from six to eight feet. Three men were frostbitten, and two have been sent to the Dunedin Hospital. On the constab'e arrivina: at the creek he was informed by a nrijier, named Alexander Crpmie, that he and his mate were coming from Moa Creek on Monday, the 12th instant, carrying with them a tin dish, cradle, and other mining implement. When they arrived about eight miles irom Separation Creek the cold and snow became so severe that they lost their way; his mate grew so faint, and unable to proceed further, that lie left him beside a rock, and . fixed the cradle so as to form a breakwind; since then he had heard nothing of him. The con- \ stable, with a party of six, accompanied Cromie to tbe locality where the missing man wa3 left, and ] after some time succeeded in finding the tin dish and j cradle beside a rock, also a quaatity of speargrass l tops, and he mast have subsisted for simedays on the i roots. His name is John Miner, 23 years old, sft ] 7in high ; brown hair, fight whiskers, a native of the county of Monaghan. Ireland. The snow having c melted, no trace whatever could be found of him. Messrs Parker and Mayne, the proprietors of the B Black Ball Hotel, acted with the most praiseworthy p kindness and promptitude, accompanying the con- f stable, taking with them a liorse laden with provisions, wine and medicine for the sufferer. Messrs I Gregg and Turnbull and Valpy and Munson, run- t holders, rendered great assistance—they collected ten horses and men and sent sent them within six miles f rf the place, when they were informed the sufferers ft f; were aU right." Reports from our ovrn correspondent

at the Dunstan, dated the 19th instant, tell us of fins ther disastrous results of the extreme severity of the weather. ■ ur correspondents says : -'•' On Monday evening accounts of ths most distressing nature were brought in from the outlyinr; districts of men and women perishiug both from both cold and want in the mountains. Such dolt fu! tales of misery ancl human suffering had, perhaps, never been made known amongst the inhabitants of a mining community before. Public feeling was excited fo such a pitch that the bare thought or ideal realisation ot one-half the horrors that were being raised about, became positively painful. People wished to render assistance to their fellow-creatures in distress,-- but could not tell how. Men who had mates at Campbell's or the Pomahawk, Pushed off to do what they coud to rescue them, anel a general deternination to search the ranges was mooted; but when about nine o'clock in the evening, two men arrived from a gully botwetn the deep stream and Drunken Woman's Creek, about forty miles from this, representing themselves as escaping from a small cymmuaity of eighteen, including women and children, who were buried up in snow, and to whom no help cmld be given, the excitement because intense, and immediate action for their relief wa determined on, at all risks." We cannot particularise the accounts that are brought in from all quarters. At one place a community of 500 people are represented to be snowed-ur, without provisions, and without any possibility of reaching them ; and the gravest apprehensions are entertained of the safety of numerous smaller parties. In the meantime fcwags and loads from off the 'backs of pack-horses aredesenbed as strewing the hills in all oirections— their owners having been compe led to abandon them to &are their lives. Everything in the reach of man is being done to save life. Ti-.e authorities are doing au m their power to relieve the distress ; their efforts being ably seconded by the people of the district, and all that is within the range of human beings to accomplish willbe done, and where help is not given it has not been for the want cf trying. Pn- lie ' meetings have been held, funds liberally luhscribed, I relief parties fully equipped with all necessaries despatched ; and we earnestly hope to be able in our next budget of news to tend a more cheering account A very daring stickin^-up case hascecuried at the iicgburn at & place known as Loee's Accommodation House. It was characterised by remarkable coolness and audacity, ar.d effected by fire men with hjaded revolvers aid pistol, and all wearing Masks. Ihe person in charge of the store was seized, bound and carried into a bedroom, but not otherwise ungeiitly used. The work of pidage was then proceeded with, and a lot of '• hemnen fetters" strung together to be applied to "any traveller who might amve and. call at the store. As many as nine persons were thus seized in secession tied up, and thrust into the bed-room. Some of them were searched and their money taken from them;nngs and other similar articles being chiva^r uslv returned. Betore leaving with their booty, the robbers informed their prisoners that it was not they who were intended for victims, but a certain bank: agent, and that if they had succeeded in their lay the small game; now bagged would been let offscotttree. 1 lie culprits have beeu tracked.very clpse, but so far no c&ptuH has been efie.ted. The case'is somewhat of a novelty with us. and lead 3to the unpleasant suspicion that some ofthe gentry who were leading gir Frederitk Pottinger such a pretty- chace in New South Wales, have forsaken his'hunting grounds, ahd turned up in Otago. , : The Provincial Council met just in time to enable us to report its opening, and give a resume ofthe contents of His Honor tne Superintendent's speech in our last Summary. We announced at the same tims the resignation of the Executive Council which had been formed under exceptional circumstancesbefore the meeting of Council, and held office accordingly ad-, terim. After some days spent in.fruitless negot-a- '. tion,'a new Ministry was formed, roasisting of Messrs S B Cargill, Provincial Secretary; WH Reynolds, Provincial Treasurer; H: G Walker, Secretary for Public Works; _and Jame3 Patterson, without offic3. The new Executive met the Council with the avowal that theyi hai 3jho distinctive policy, having accepted . office only to Carry on the work of administration, on the land question they were not as one in opinion and they left the Home to deal with it as they best could. The topics that huve thus far been entertained * in the Council have been only bf local interest. ; The estimates of revenue and expenditure have been laid on the table of fhe House. The revenue for the year from the Ist April, 1863. to March 3lst, 1864. is estimated at L 1,023.500. Of this amount, L 650.000 is put down as expected to be derived from the sa*e;; of debentures ; ;L150,000 from Crown Land; L9t,soD—the three-rigbtsof these Customs; L60,00u from the export duty on gold ; L 34,000 from Gold Fields' Licensss; L 7500 from Auctioneers anl Publicans' Licenses; L 11.600 from Harbor, Jetty,-and Pilotage Dues; L 2500 Rents of Ferries, &c; L 2503 from Sheep Assessments ;■ L 000 as Repayment of Immigrants' Bills ; LIOOO School Pees ami Sale of Books; Repayment from Hospitals, L 500; Interest due fiom Town Board on Loans, LSjOO ; Inci'fedtal Receipts, Pounnkeeper^' Fees, and Dogtix. LSOO. The proposed expenditure is estimated at L 838,648, out of which sum L 25.0 0 is set down for the Harbor Department; L 35 000 torDunedin Water Works ;"L20,030 for fortifications^ LIB.ODO for- electrict telegraph; the following amounts for roads:—Northern Trunk, L 49.000; Southern Trunk, L7o,000; Northern interior trunk?, L 7500; Central interior trunks, L 3300; Southern intt rior trunks L3COO; Northern main branch roada, Ll4 119; Southern msiu branch roads, L 9500; interior mainbranch roads. L 850 0; miscellaneous roads, L 22.700; bridges, L 27.542; jetties, L 1417; and under th? hend of public buildings, L 29 367 for schoals, 19:702 for Hospitals. L 20.000 for Post v ffice, Dunedin, 19,500. for Marketplace, 13.500 for .Court House. Gaol. &c. L3LOOO for Provincial Buildings, L 12.648 for Gold Fields'Buildinos,&c, &c. The financial statement ct the Treasurer, ot which' these figures are the index, has not yet besn made to the Council.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ODT18630825.2.14

Bibliographic details

SUMMARY, Otago Daily Times, Issue 524, 25 August 1863

Word Count
2,594

SUMMARY Otago Daily Times, Issue 524, 25 August 1863

Working