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An official return with which we have been favored shows that during the month of July, 464 Post Office money orders were issued in thi s Province, their total amount being L' 2,253 10s 9tl. Of these, 348 orders, for L 1,637 Is lOd were issued at the head office ; and the next largest number and amount stand to the credit of the Duristan-444 orders, for L2OB 7s. 2d. The number of orders paid during the same month was 119, and their amount L 614 6s 9d. In Dnnedin. 87 were paid, amounting to L 451 17s 3d ; and at the Dunstan, 15, representing L72 7s 6d. Since the commencement .of.the system, on the Ist September, 18G2, 3,091 orders, for L1G.064 13s 11.1 have been issued ;■ and 059, amounting to L3.3SG 3s 8d have been.paid.

The general Mauritius news to hand is not of much importance. Tlie principal subject before the Legislative Council was the Ordinance on Rivers and Canals, One of the clauses, making all Springs and Streams public property, had., provoked a good d-al of opposition, and a very general remonstrance, on the part of the press and the consequence has been a suspension of the subject for the pres nt. . The Birthday of the Queen, and the Marriage of the Prince of Wales, were both . celebrated at St. Louis with high festival. ,A project for lighting the town with gas is being entertained.- '

In another part of this issue, we republish fro.n the Provincial Gazette, of, .WeJfiesdav, a veiy valuable and interesting raining report'on the Shotover district, by Mr' Mining Surveyor Wright. Mr Wright gives, in a very clear and intOli-j-nfc manner, a complete geological discripciou of that valuable, .gold field ; and the tenor of .his conclusions satisfactorily establishes the auriferous character of tho district through wliicli the "Shotover and its-tributary streams.flow.

' We have at last a, taste of somehhiu* like Wintry weather. Yesterday morning the ground was thickly covered with, snow, and at intervals throughout the da}' there ware heavy falls ; a strong wind driving the flakes about blindingly for those compelled to be abroad. During tho evening, the'wiud was blowing almost a gale, and there was a rapid aucce-sioa of showers of mingled hail and sleet. The roar of fchs waves breaking oa the Ocean beach "was something terrifically grand, especially after nightfall.

We publish particulars of the unhappy vengeance of the Hovahs of Madagascar upon the young King lladaraah 11. for his liberal and refo.ming tendencies. "His successor on the throne U Queen Rabodo, and the conditions on which she is to hold the sceptre are—lst. That she ehall not iniulge in strong liquors. - 2. That she shall not have power of life and death over li3r people without the consent of the Council of Mitiistors. S. That honors and rank shall-bs for life, and that no officer-shall be degraded without deliberation of the Council. 4. Religion is' to be free froili all "annoyances (traeasseries.) 5. Abolition for ever of the " tanguin." 6. The- Queen shall not listen to any flattering word or false report that may; be made to her. 7, That no one who is occupied about the Queen, shall, be proud with anybody, or shall betray or speak* ill of anybody.

The Port Louis Commercial Gazette expresses high satisfaction at; the appointment to the Government of Mauritius of a man of "such experience and higii reputation" as Sir Henry Barkly, and states that his arrival is anxiously waited for in the colony.

We learn from Mauritius that offers have been made to the Cape Government by the " Union Company" (whose mail projects were some time ago courting the favor of the mercantile community in Melbourne) to extend steam communication from the Cape to Mauritius. The Port Louis Gazette says : —"lf the Cape finances were not in so awkward a position that colony would no doubt be willing to contribute the sum required from it,,as the subsidy towards the direct line is sonfined to a double postage."

By letters from Queenstown to the 7th instant, we learn that a very agreeable change had taken

place in the weather, and changed the whole aspect of affairs. Business is said to be improving and confidence generally increasing.

The Ministerial crisis is not yet solved, at any rate no result has been made public. It is believed that by this afternoon, an Executive will eiither be formed, or the announcement be made to the Council that it is in course of formation. Mr Dick, it is rumored, has been invited to undertake the task.

The case of Mr Bayley Pike the absconded squatter, came before Mr Justice Richmond yesterday, while he was holding a sitting under the Debtors ana Creditor's Act. It will be seen from our report that it is opening out into a beautifully complicated affair, and that it promises to he long in the hands of the lawyers, and unavoidably so. Already it is sought to show that the insolvent was a partner with his brother Mr S. 11. Pike, of Nelson, in the Elephant Hills Station, Canterbury ; and it is alleged that the conveyance of Carisbrook to the trustees under Mrs Pike's marriage settlement—made on the day on which the iusolventfled hence—was what the law calls a voluntary one, and is fraudulent and void under the Act.

Sir \V. Stawell, the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Victoria, has appointed Mr Charles Brown of this city to be a Commissioner for the Supreme Court of Victoria, for talcing affidavits in the Proviue/j of Otago.

The Lancashire Bell Ringers gave two performances yesterday at the Odd Eello.vs' Hall, George-street" and this evening they are to perform for the last time in vtago, attlie Theatre Royal, for the benefit of Mr Coppin.

The . Resident Magistrate yesterday was occupied chiefly with the case of cattle stealing from Wright, Robertson and Co, for which Gerard, Welsh, and Bell, were brought up on remand. The two nret-named prisoners were further remanded for a week, and Bill was released on his own recognisance in LIOO to appear before the Court on Thursday next. The other cases brought before the Court were for petty offence* and breaches of the Town and Country Police Ordinances.

There was a change in the programme of the Christy Minstrels last evening, and for the better ; there was a change also; in the look of the interior ef the Princess Theatre, but it was for the worse, and very decidedly so. But the smallness of the audience did not prevent the Minstrels going through their performance with care and spirit. Mr Melvyn» sang the very popular " Beautiful Star" capitally, It suited his voice, and he evidently liked it. Mr Kainford's solos in the first part were "Toll the Bell/ and "The Mocking Bird." The former was, we think, the better sung ; while the latter was the better accompanied, chorally and ipstrumentally, Mr Stewart's beautihuly sympathetic, although rather light tenor voice was heard to perfection in " Emmeliue," which is a most pleasing composition. Ifc was altogether a bit of singing .that would have secured applause from the most critical of British audiences. In the second part he gave the ballad, "The Pride of Tralee," and was almost up to the mark of his first song. Messrs Leslie and Norton did the fooling merrily.' The quintette, " Come where my love lies dreaming," was judiciously retained in the programme ; and ifc was almost faultlessly rendered. . Mr Leslie's "Stump speech" had not ■ much merit: it was a dilution of the original "Or any oder man." Mr Steele's violincello solo was a capital bit; of honestly skilful playing ; two or three airs being given with variations, but without any effort to startle by merely musical monstrosities of effect. The burlesque opera concluded the entertainment With anything like fair weather, we feel sure that the Miiristrels would have a successful campaign ; and we heartily wish they may have it. ;

The attendance at the Theatre Royal, last evening, was .poor indeed. But what other result could have been expected ? To walk from the suburbs into town, through snow and.mud and amidst a gale of wiud and fierce showers, was more than enough to deadeu the keenest appetite for enjoyment; and, inevitably, therefore, nobody attempted it. The pieces were " A Bird in Hand worth Two ia the Bush," and "The Happiest Day of My Life," Mr Coppin appearing in. the latter. We would specially remind all lovers of. the drama that Mr Coppin this evening takes his farewell benefit. Circumstances have caused his visit to Otago to have been the reverse of a prosperous one ; and we should be'glad to see the House crowded, just as a token of friendliness, if Mr Coppin's own great merits as an actor should prove insufficient to induce a struggle with the muddy state of the streets and the general badness of the weather—for it maybe feared that there has really been a '' break" now, and that a stretch of storm and rain, or snow, mny be expected. In a town where there are so n aiy old Victorians, Mr Cuppin'a appsal ought to be widely responded to, and we can only repeat our hope that ifc will be. A new piece, " Oid Phil's Birthday," is to be produced ; the Bell Ringers appear, for the last time here j and Mr Coppin sings his " local" as Billy Barlow.

From the Mauritius.papers to hand by the brig Kestrel, we learn, that the present state and prospects of the neighbouring colony cf Reunion are far from.-favorable. There is a heavy deficiency in the revenue, the last crop was much less than expected, and the plantations for the coming crop have suffered severely from two hurricanes and since from dry weather. The Council lias been assembled by the Governor, and after much discussion considerable reductions.have been made in the principal brandies of expenditure, and a loan of 500,000 fames authorised. Amongst; other reductions is the sum paid to the P. and 0. Company, for tho Postal service. The subsidy is to cease at the end of the third quarter, of the present year, when it-is expected the projected line of the Messageries Impcridles from Aden to Reunion will be established.

lln a reconfi debate in the New South Wales Parliament on the appointment of a committee to enquire concerning the dismissal of a certain subordinate in one "ot the GoverniLC-t departI men13, some curious facts connected with " ye manners and customs" of Government clerks were elicited. One lion, member said: "One of the parties connected with this correspondence was a Mr Hall, and he would tell them'the characters in which he was celebrated in the ofdee of the honorable Secretary for .Works. In tie first instance, he rendered himself an admirable adaption of a scissor-grinding machine. (Laughter.) He was perfect in 'Punch and Judy;" but principally for the entertainment of the youth in his office, was distinguished by strange antics to emulate the evolutions of the • Suffolk Punch, he was also distinguished as 'Ilichard the Third, 1 Shylock,' < Macbeth,' < Billy Barlow,' the « Tap-, room Toper'—which he performed with the usual appliances of a bottle of brandy and a bottle of beer—and all in a public office, in time that ought to be devoted to the services of. the public. The other gentleman alluded tbin the correspondence had, he was informed, been laid up several times .with delirium tremens ■ but it was rather strange that both these gentlemen had medical certificates to show that brandy was requisite for their

health. It appeared that it was absolutely necessary for the officers of this department to take stimulating drinks during the performance of their duties. He believed he should be able to prove beyond a doubt that they were both drunkards. (Here Mr Dalgleish read a document accusing those gentlemen of being' continually, under the influence of liquor in the office to which they belonged). The principal qualifications of these officers appeared to be of a dramatic and vocal kind; for most of their time appeared to be occupied in siuging ' Billy Barlow' and spouting ' Shakespeare/ One of them had acquired the nime of Spokeshave' in consequence/ Mr Arnold, the Minister for Public Works, defended the ' refreshment' system. He said—" Was there any harm in a clerk taking stimulating drinks in the office ? He (Mr Arnold) held that there was nothing wrong in a clerk taking a sandwich and glass of sherry ia the office, instead of going out to an hotel, so as to save the time of the public ; he was not deserving °f any censure. The best clerks were those who took their sandwiches to the office, accompanied with a small quantity of sherry."

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Bibliographic details

Otago Daily Times, Otago Daily Times, Issue 515, 14 August 1863

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2,117

Otago Daily Times Otago Daily Times, Issue 515, 14 August 1863

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