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THE DUNSTAN.

(FROM OUR OWN COTtRESPONDENT.) Dunstan, 27th July. Since my last we have had a great change in the weather, instead of snow and hard frost we have had very heavy rain, especially during the nights of Friday and Saturday last, on the latter evening it blew a perfect hurricane, and much damage was done to many of the canvas buildings. On Saturday, about noon, the river which had previously fallen so ! that a number of the diggers were enabled to commence work again, began steadily to rise, and continued doing so till about four o'clock yesterday afternoon, when it reached a much greater height than at any of the previous floods. The current roiled down furiously, ■and numbers of people betook themselves to ,fthe banks of the Molyneux to witness the exciting scene. As usual jja large quantity, of timber came floating down, and parties industriously inclined made a good day's work by fishing the logs out of the stream as they came drifting along. Hill's bridge across the Molyneux at the Kawarau junction, was two feet under water at 5 o'clock last evening. This is a private speculation, and the bridge was erected at a cost of Ll,200; it is available for foot passengers and pack horses. During Thursday night a white horse, the property of Messrs Welsh and Nash, of Hartley-street, tumbled over the cliff which is about 100 feet high, at the rear of the store, and was dashed to pieces on the rocks below. The poor animal was an old favorite on the Dunstan, and rejoiced- in the soubriquet of "Lord Lovel." MA.XUHBBIKIA. The flood at this township has been productive of much damage to the whole of Ferry-street, up to its j miction with Victoriastreet, being submerged. During Sunday night the river rose 15 feet, aud continued doing so during Sunday, at the rate of a loot air hour.

A distressing and fatal accident occur: ed about ten o'clock in the morning, about a mile and a half up the river from the township, to a young man named John Roberts, who was engaged extracting floating timber from the Molyneux. By some means he lost bis balance and tumbled into the stream, and was immediately swept away by the rushinocurrent. He was seen to rise twice to the surface and then disappear beneath tbe roaring waters. The father of the young man was standing by at the time of the unfortunate occurrence, but could render no assistance whatever to his drowning son. - Several parties who bad left for tbe Hogburn on Saturday had to return in consequence of the'flooded state of the Manuherikia River. Tbe pedestrians between this and the Dunstan township were also much inconvenienced in consequence of the crossing place at the Mutton Town Creek being too far under water.

' A man was discovered on Sunday morning: in the ranges, towards Campbell's, very much, frost-bitten and almost on the point of death; no sooner was it known in the township than the inhabitants of the Manuherikia quickly responded to the calls of humanity by raising a'subscription for the purpose of fetching in the,poor unfortunate sufferer. "■-.-• "During the latter part of tbe afternoon a number of buildings were removed from Perry to the Upper street for safety. A large number of diggers left the river yesterday for the new rush at Campbell's, first-rate accounts being brought in on on Saturday. There are a number of people returning from the Hogburn, tbe severity of the weather almost entirely precluding work; one digger assured me that on Tuesday night last be was compelled to ?;et up four times from his bed for the purpose of removing the snow off his tent, the superincumbent weight endangering its safety. At Black's things have improved very much lately, a great many have come from the Hogburn to try their luck here, there are about 1000 people on tbe ground, and asa general rule, are all doing something. A considerable addition to the population, is expected this winter, the climate not being so severe as at the Hogburn. _By 2. party just returned from tbe Lake district we have intelligence of heavy rains during the last three days and many of the streams being impassable. People have been waiting over two days at the Roaring Meg, endeavoring to cross. At the Shotover, seperate. and distinct shocks of an earthquake were beard during the nights of Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday last, and ?some immense boulders were detached from the sides of the ranges, which occurrence has spread considerable alarm among the inhabitants. Queenstown is said to bave received on Dunedin mail for nearly a fortnight.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ODT18630729.2.23

Bibliographic details

THE DUNSTAN., Otago Daily Times, Issue 501, 29 July 1863

Word Count
776

THE DUNSTAN. Otago Daily Times, Issue 501, 29 July 1863

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