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DUSTAN.

ORE AT FLOOD S,

THE RUSH TO THE HOGrBURN.

Dunstan, 9th June, 1863. Since my last,-th? weather has been excessively wet. During last night and today the river has risen tremeiiduously, more so than in the recollection of that venerable personage " the oldest inhabitant." It is at least fully twenty feet higher than on Sunday, and is rising stilll The dam-ge done is almost incalculable j the current is rolling down furiously, and numbers of tents have baen washed away,;and huts submerged altogether. Likewise a good few of the miners have been compelled to ''.up st ck; and away" at a very short notice. MoiganV coal-pit is under water, and .the river must go down ere we get anymore '* firing/ the consequences ot which will be hard to guess at. Throughout the day a number of men hiva been busily engaged fishing for timber by means of long hooker poles or jjrspnels fixed on the end of a line, each man pacing himself on the" extremity of a projecting rock, and with ■cither pole or rope in hand hauls in the piet-es of passing timber as they are borne along by the rushing tide. In this employment | some have been very successful, and have made a very profitable day's work. To cross the river, by m'ealu's of tbe ordinary "row boats," is an exceedingly dilficuit task. At starting they have to pull a. long way, keeping close along the bank above tne p»rt intended for landing, and th-n turn ;he boat's head to the stream and row for their very lives, when down comes the boat on the foaming surface like lightning, and is, with a considerable amount of labor, brought to the intended landing. All hopes of working the bed of the river this season are now dispelled^ tliis. untoward «vent spreading consternation and dismay among both the mining and trading community, and has, as a digger remarked, caused every storekeeper to close his vo ume of outstanding accounts; since Monday morning bills drawn on the Molyneux Bank biing no longer negotiable. Work, as far as the river is concerned, is now virtually at an end; but fortunately there is one redeeming feature left—we know there is plenty of^gold in the ranges, which will now stand the chance of a trial; in fact, if the same amount of labor had been spent; in developing the resources of the ranges and terraces a? has been wasted on the river, a vei-y different state of affairs would have been the result; but it is to be hoped tuat this disaster wili have taught us wisdom, and never again, as the old adage says, " have ad our eggs in one basket." . :

As an illustrati m of the auriferous wealth of the river beds, I may mention that a party working about live miles up the Kavvaiau from it j uactiou with tiie x\lolyneux, obtained on Saturday last, from scarcely three square ftet surface, three pounJs weight of gold; but all hope of obtaining more is gone, and the claim has to be ab .in ioned. This time last week th;; river hanks were limd. with a hopeful bu?y multitude, working both night and day. and fondly indulging in bright hopes of the future. Many were on the point of liquidating outstanding scores at the various stores, or of indulging in a few more of the necessaries, or little comforts of line, to which jo many had long been a stranger, or remitting small sums to friends aiid families at homa ; but now all such plea^ano littlef.mcLs are dispelled; the ioariug waters have covered everything, and blank despair has taken possession of many a mind that hai hel' on hoping, as it were almost against hope, for tlie last nine months.

The miners are leaving for the " flogburn Rush " as iastas they can git away, loaded drays,pack horses, an j n:ea with swags, are going all day long. A horse or horse and dray cannot be got for love or money. The rate of can'iagj to the rush is four pence per pount'. Ma yof the diggers who have not the means c-j pay freight, are conveying their goods themselves, ana it is surprising to see the manner in which they are Joadtd with cradles, shovels, picks, tents, and cooking utensils; in reality, realising vhe picture of a walking " Johnny All Sorts.1' '■'■"' CORONER'S INQUEST. '

Testerday, Jackson KedJell, Ksq, R.M >' held an inquest at M'Phersons -station, distance ; some twenty miles from here, oh the Dunedin road, on Ihe body of an aboriginal native of Queenslaudcalltd 4 Billy." The deceased was a shepiierd employed t n the station^ and had been during rhe day tending a flock of sheep. A married man who was employed along with deceased {thiy were bothat that time on their way home from work), wishing to go. some little distance on an errand, gave him (the deceasei) a bottle of gin to carry home to his wife, telling him at the same time- he would- shortly; follow; but; upon hi 3 coming home, no '"Billy"; was there1 A. search wasmade the next morning. ;;the deceased wa9 discovired lying doad r near the road side.. The contents of the bottle being consumed. & post mortem examination was made by Dr Jackson, winch left no doubts as t> the caiiss of death, and a verdict accordingly was returned. • -~.'. Mr VVardsn Keddell experienced rgreat difficulty in keeping the track on his return journey, in con equerice of tha great depth of snow which" had fallen since he previously passed. - THE HOGBUBN RUSH. . ..'. I am foitunateiy able to put you in possession of ieliable particulars respecting this "rush" whicli has caused such excitement here. A lone:-resident on the Dunstan, a Mr Thomas Morgan, left there yesterday. at noon, and arrived here about the same hour to-day. Tie purpose for which hs came in, was to obtain permission to cut a race so as to turn the Houghburn Creek into that of the Hoghurn, by which means a stream of water equal to t\& uluice heads will be brought into the

centre of Ihe workings, no water being obtainable there at present His account of the rush is as follows : —When leaving, there were about 200 people ou the ground, a 1 rge number were giing in, likewise a &;ood ma -y were leaving. All over the diggings, the ground was covered with snow to the depth of eight inches, arid wnsialling fast then, and but very little work was going on in consequent. At present the discoveries are coatined to two gu"lies, they are each about three tniles in length, and are about half a mile apart. In the first, opened gully gold his been found during its entire lengfc'i, *in tin other or one more recently opene 1, as far as prospected fur about one and a-half mile 3 thp same results have been obtained. My informant states that thepiospeefs they cbrained *ere from one to.tinve grains to the <.ish, and that was nboutthe general run lof the dirt they tried. In ;he first gully the goid is very fine, but weigh* well; in the other it is of rather a scaly description. The depth of wishdirt is from six meats to two feet near the creek or water course Li tiie centre cf the guides there is no further prepara tionr-quired than to "g-j on washing;" hue in the banns tne depth of sinking is from two to six feet. in parts the run of gold j s COn fi ae: i to the creeks, which are about twenty f,- e t wile, but when tiie auriferous deposit extends into the banks it is from two to tliive claims wide, the extent of each claim being 50 feet square. The wash- dirt is composed of quartz and sandstone gravel, intermixed witlialar^e quantity of floating reef; but in the creek claim* tiiere are very large boulders. The bed roitk is asuft variegited colored slate, sorneth'n? between red and brown. There is no timber »i;bin less than three miles <f the diggings, aud iv water till the race is complec -<1 from the Hcughburn^ret-k. There have been considerably better prospect* obtained ttian by Air Morgan's pa.ty; many claims will average from 3 to 17 grains to ihe dish, and as much as an ounce and a half to the 1.-ad has been obtained. My informant says that lie considers 'ths ground musi suitable for sJucing purposes, but were wa ver plentiful anyone wi ha cradle could make small wages. _ I may state that as the length of race to be cue is little over a mile, water will very shortly be on the ground. Provisions are very scarce and hardly obtainable, numbers are living on nothing else.than the flash of wild pigs, which are said to abound here in profusion.

MANTJHERIKIA. Both this and the Molyneux rivers have considerably increased in volume from the late rains, immng operations on the oanks of both being entirely suspended. The ba^k workings at the mouth of the Manuherikia aie ail flooded. Pumps, sluiue boxes, and other mining implements that were not removed from the claims are all either covered with water or washed away entirely. The floods in the rivers have done an enormous amount of damage, and a large number of the miners are leaving for the Ho;jburn rush, every team, i:s it arrives fiora Uunedin, being engaged t.carry loading oy swags. - The st! ec-ts are in a fearful nwldy condition, being almost impassable. 4 man living in Hufosher's Gully lost one ot his big toes through frost bite—Or Smith performed the operation. It appears he hvl been on a visic to some mates working in the Pom.ohawk Ranges, and in returning commitred the foiiy ot walking without his shoes through the snow.

•POBJKEB'S IKQUB'T. An inquest was held ytsterday, at the Shamrock Hotel, Victoria-stieet, by John 6. Hickson, E*q, It. M.,,on.the body ofatnau named Andrew Jackson, a^ miner,-, thirty-one years' •of age; living at Oanray's trudy. The deceased expired on Monday evening I last rather suddenly, He had performed his usual work aloiost'up,lo the time of his death,' but com plained of pains in his back. 'Hhmnte, James Finlay, procured him some medicine, but it gave no j re'iet. A post mortem examination was made by Ur ' Johu Loru, and death" was found to \\i\s resulted : j.qb discuss of the heart. A corres.pou.dig yerdict W.as re^uffied "* ".• 1 Previous to holSrftg. Jhis inquest a considerable I amount of. public time wusSFa?ted. The jury, upon being summoned, weie informed-.inat t"»e oroner 1 woul I be lga-ly ju tea minuter, but wereSK££waiting more than an hour (your correspondent intk-;-:b-|r-gain), and it was with con.-iderable difficulty that thY summoning officer could persuads t:ieiu to remain,-! tiiey were iou I in. their expressions ot di«appr batiou at being kept so long iv tha wet, and were compelled to »taml out in the pouring ra,iu or seek shelter in the bar ot the hotel; after tyie coroner did arrive j another delay arose in borrowing a. bibb \the most ditfl.ult of n\l books to get a loau of on the diggings). At last one was procured by a public officer, and th. n the jury was bworn. LATER PARTICULARS. Buu-stau, 13th JuneAs accouafg come in from the outlying di 3 ricts, we hear of noihiugbaf damige sustained by the mining community. Tents, huts, and took being ruthlessly swept away by the devastating element, and we have only to be thankful that the flmd attained its greatest height by daylight, and not at night. At ihe Kawiirauaud Fox's nil the riv>r olaims a>e subm-rged, tha pid looks and tunnels i-ithj imnks are mostly all fallen iv ami destroyed, an I would require a large amount of labour to be experideu to put things right again, even should the watur rccsde a bit prior to their again being worked, which is not very likely for some time to come as judging'from appearances, tne wea'rher does not in thd ieasb dpgi-dc! pioiuiss to be favorable. The -river has fallen, considerably, but nothing sufficient to prevent work in any sh tpe being resumed. Down the river, about 10 miies below tha Mariuherikia, a . party of men had a ve<y narrow escape j ttiey had been working a tunnel in the bank, and for tho convenience of being handy to their wjrk, hal ereoted their teuton the bauk immeiiafceiy over''the tuunel ; finding the river mini; and the woi-sir.gs likely to sustain damage, they tille 1 up the inoutb. ot the tunnel wit!) earth previously extracted, so as to exclude 'he -.water; bat. thi< precaution wai of no avail, it was sion filled up by the riding waters, when the roof suddenly gave way, and down fame the tent with all its c-jnteuts of" provision V bedding a'ud cooking utensils, everything, iiito the roaring .cm rent, and were swept rapidly 'away, leaving the owners ot the tent barely time to escape with their live 3.

At the Teviot and Miller's Flat the damage has b?.en excessive—mining operatioas along the river being entirely suspendel, and numerous dwellings swept away. On Thursday niffhc no one dare sleep in any of the huts that were in close proxi i-ity to the river; numbers had, like the cage, fc> make their " eyrie" in the steep rocks, which in pi ices almost overhang the stream; while others who were not fortunate enough to obtfiu this shelter spent the night on ths damp grass. One fatal accident is said 10 have occurred at Miller's Flat. ■ A man was crossing the river in a boat, when the free of the cunent overpowered him, and he was borne away on its impetuous bosom, and disappeared from view. The miners working, in the I'omahawk Ranges ap • pear to thorjuguly appreciate the care and thought fulness of the Government in erecting snow poles between the Teviot township and Pomahawk Quly, anl which, in these snow-covered regions, has been the In; cans of averting much personal inconvenience, and probably preventing loss of life. But a short time previous to tha erecMon of these guide posts, two diggers had been to the township for the purpose of purchasing a supply of flour, both returning' each with a bag containing about 301b, but missing the track they became bewildered in the saowy waste, and it was oniy by throwing away, their burdens that they succeeded in extricating themselves. From the neighborhood of the Molyneux the miners arc leaving in all directions, an>l places whicli a week ago teemed with a busy hopeful population, is now as silent as before Hartley and Kiley first discovered gold 01 its bdnks. The Hogburn is the chief point of attraction (especially for''those who have means) for the fugitives almost resemble a routed " Federal army " after a defeat by the.'' Confederates," while those of small or no capital are betaking themselves to the oil diggings or down to DuneUin in the hopes of obtaining work. * By a "packer wh> arrived late !ast night from Fox's, I hear that the flools have been equally as disastrous there, aud two mea .-ire stated to liave lost"their lives. News is anxiously looked for from the Late district, veiy serious damage being apprehended Also, the packer who should have arriv'd from.Qusenstown on Friday last has not yet made his ■ appaarahce. ■■ ■ « -■< '■.-.-. ■. never has anything produced, such a painful sensation here as did your journal of Monday last, which brought the first intelligence of that heart ren-ling calamity, the running down of the Pride of the Yarra steamer^ the'details of which were so-tiuchingly tiescribed in it* columns. No sooner were the contents of the Times of thatday scanned over, than a feeing of profound pity which could scarcely obtain-utter- j ence came over the entire community, and the wail of our own misfortunes speedily gave way for the poor sufferers by tha. terible collision.: People rushid' in breathless Laste for a copy of the newspaper, anil 1 many came miles next day to obtain, one, each sue- j ceeding arrival of the coach producing a piiriful anxiety for more news of the appalling catastrophe.' And many was the silent tear shed by the stalwart miner, who, fo getting his own pecuniary trouble* gave way to sorrow for the •'unfortunate fanii'y'" who after safely crossing 16 000 miles of the turbulent ocean to the goal of their'hopes and desins perished on its very: thre'shoK'•■--:" . THE KUSH AT THE HOGBURN. .On Fri'ayJast.thera.couid not have been' less than 2000 people on the ground, an^ numbers were 'still pouring in, also a considerable quantity were leiving The roads were in a fearful state, and number- of teams were detained ab «ut four miles from the diggings, in consequence of tlie ground about being so rooted up by the wild pigs, that the late raius' had

tunifd it into a regular qua-fmire, also pirfc-.of ihis -he road is very hilly. On tlie main Waikouaiti roaa the Government are repairing bad places, and making S ood difficult eroding,. 0 O,i the direct JJunsta* road to the rush no piovisions were at all obwiinabe. the larder at the "single shanty" beins tJ?T T- u.y n"r? trailers, the only refreshwa. goo 1 store At the two c-wsing* of the Manuka punts hare been placed for the accommodal fo f-In f S PaSSengf S'^ h0 were Pre™usly comp.il d fl °^ ip, ™:1 crof river, after the fashion of showonViehri SSaX/ a X eSe' who^ example the traveler on tae broken bridge was reconiinende I t> follow Many have endured great privations on the S, SSeSsTe? "^ ai^^ traveller to On the diggings the snow which had prevou^lv n'& e^'T a fd/ Ortilel;lSt<layor so S lazily •nut.ncr, which fortunate occurrence will be the nv-ans ot setting people to work, besides givir.g a temporal supply of water. One batcher'a shop hadP btn erececl. and the owner had received a suddlv of 20 l^\Zl Bt *? I s 4<l per lb • wi!d P°rk- is- Also foX -XJ 9? b! ea °ST lL F™™°™ wore as KS lb R•' , J *el' 4s 6d '» SUS U"' ls 6' 5 Gutter, spim occurred on Thursday last. althouV at a fKffXf fcp t0 a aakei named M Gee, Jiving at blade's h-irl-in-f arrived with a l ol d of bread And was mmSX offered by a speculator 5s par loaf for theTt wh eh tempting offer he Jiad the moral courage to'refuse andm the most munificent manner disposed of Ms load "singly" to the diners for 3s a loaf P ** Most or the miners on the ground have a very gooi opinion of the place- *Z judging f, oin ft/ hilarity prevailing f a ' tSr ents during the evenmsr, it is a convincing nroof that projects are considered the reverse of %S a gram, to the diah. Previous to the grelf rSh the claims-were, taken up as creek worfciuM a) fes Mn f a? ckV V l6ll' Proportions to tha usual SO feet for dry ..sinking, which ansui«emMit appears, to gi Yd o-eneraT di S s4fSi O n° Tnd t.ie clairakoUers avow that they must fie the n C u^t4tg Sreater pa"'of t!ie .^ W5& o D «n S-tiir b t lai'P af ea of aurif erou^ ground to op n m rhis neigho >rhood there c.an be ne mistak-• " , IS, techfllCally c*Hed "made hills,-covered Manv?fh?:l qaUtZ aYel' aboU!id i 0 *Urtire.W fx" uF^f t^ V, c beell a^vork about this quarter ii tae £as.t twelve months, wh eh was general'v aSned <IWkW. W^fKfig seve^ f + r°Ugll tiie waut «f water and the S 7 ti f c weatheri a«<i 'torn, what I can vervim nre lV eW Uttlo doubfe but that some aSSSp ru s: o¥eilei wlii be 'r?-^?.*;. A puny sxpross with relays on the roul, has'been wganiseu by^a Mr;TJ.oitias Dobson.an old resideS 3 . it is intended to start from here every Saturday, immedime'.y after the arrival of Oobb's Ri V?-U^ dia; PeiMASthe journey through via Slack's, in ei^Ut konra ■ ... ■'■ V r i-.° ■ r JtL la<J^' l^:?S s Weioaking up aga-n j^many are returiuug | lO tq tha Hogbum; a * number iri coming in trom the Molyueux, a.id-there is;every an pearauce of a h«rge population bejn tf settled^ here for the winter.- i Tiig average yield is ft-om- 7d-vt ta an ounce and a hail to: the laa^i, but in tances-of much better success frequently-occur, as du-ing -ihe last lour weeks oi.« party obtained no jess thsn lOOoi and another 26ozm a single week. .Many clai,ns: were for the Ho^bum which were iyioldim' veJy^ell^one from whicfe lo£vla= waa-taken and averagetnniyt to the Joai, whs, given up, knd a^a matter of qoufs^gSK^C^P^; from four to fie feet aiukiag is tfee gueral vu;irttr-the ground, but smi?. 20 teet gi omul has been ppeneaw^!ii fc(l his y»eultd well; oue patty got. 5 z fivin threeloalsT^^ I

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ODT18630715.2.23

Bibliographic details

Otago Daily Times, Otago Daily Times, Issue 489, 15 July 1863

Word Count
3,474

DUSTAN. Otago Daily Times, Issue 489, 15 July 1863

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