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LONDON.

(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.)

Italy on the departure of last mail was the leading European topic—with the astounding fact of Garibaldi at the head of an armed rebellion, in revolt not against but for his country, as he in his pure patriotism understood his duty, namely —Italy for the Italians. This was the patriot's policy, pure and simple; but what a pity that whilst his friend the King was for a time forced to submit to foreign interference, this restless gallant spirit should so impatiently bear the French yoke, as by his hasty and ill-advised outbreak to bring to the country he loves so well the horrors of civil war. and risk the loss of all that great good which his own heroic patriotism had so recently achieved—how painful to know thafc this misguided hero, was in his own country, chased like a wild beast, and eventually surrounded by hostile Italian bayonets. This act was clearly war agaiust Foreign occupation and the Franco - Italian policy, and the result was not difficult to conjecture. Yet it was generally believed thafc while the majority of his countrymen disapproved of his conduct, and firmly supported the King and constitution, none of tbem, even by royal cossmiand, would level hostile weapons against the sacred person'of this illustrious son of liberty. We all know how Spanish intrigue and jealousy once sent home in chains to a country he had served too well, the great Columbus from the very continent he had discovered after years of toil and privation—a picture which at this long period we cannot contemplate without shuddering. W hat, then, must we have felt on the bare supposition of Garibaldi a prisoner in the country of his own creation ? No doubt the King's position was a trying one; he was compelled to proceed vigorously agaiust the rash act of his devoted friend and comrade, to maintain the present friendly relations with France; for Austria was intently watching this deplorable movement, and would eagerly profit by Italian misfortune. The man in the red shirt had long upset the serenity of three Sovereigns and in especial, the Garibaldi demonstration so far disturbed the icy supremacy or' Louis Napoleon, as to force an angry announcement, in which tbe terms "insolent menace" and " French honor" were conspicuous. The French fleet was ordered to the coast of Sicily and was immediately followed by the English Squadron; indeed the Italian question assumed so grave an aspect, that Earl Russell shortened his holiday, and hastened home from the Wicklow mountains, to take the official chair in Doivniug-street, determined closely to watch these momentous proceedings, and endeavor to arrive at a distinct understanding with Napoleon as to his real intentions in Italy, and get a day fixed for the withdrawal of the French garrison, and thus at once annihilate that standing menace to the peace of Europe. But the world was soon to bo enlightened on the mysteries of this first act of tbe Italian drama. And now Italy is in mourning. The curtain was rudely drawn aside and revealed the sickening spectacle of Garibaldi in Catania completely surrounded by Italian foes. His old comrade Col. Pallavicini was sent by Cialdini with strict orders to fight ancl capture the audacious rebel—Like a lion°at bay he was surprised at Aspromonte, and without a word of parley, or even "the humane summons to surrender, the Garibaldini were fired into, and in a i^v minutes all was over; and this hero of a hundred fights, this guileless child of liberty, who would cheerfully shed his life's blood for his country, is defeated, wounded, and captured on the soil of bio own loved Italy—and this by whom and for what? A most serious question, which has yet to be answered. The mangled patriot was conveyed hastily from place to place, and now lies bleeding in his gloomy prison at Spezzia, his son Menotti, and some 2,000 of his followers being also confined in various fortresses, nofc more than ten or a dozen on either side having been killed in the fight, and the poor General falling at the first fire. The King is deeply grieved, and has visited his betrayed friend in bis dungeon home, doubtless feeling the awful responsibility of this sad calamity ; for ifc has yet to be decided whether there shall be a trial, pardon, or exile—all this, of course, depending on the Royal will and pleasure of Napoleon tho Third. But this inscrutable potentate is in no hurry for such a trifling matter. He rewards Colonel (now General) Pallavicini with the badge of the Legion of Honor, and coolly leaves these intricacies to run their course, that he may indulge a while in bull fighting and sea bathing at Biarritz, little heeding the storm of indignation raised by his persistent interference in Italian affairs. The hapless Garibaldi now learns that there are tw.i languages used in diplomacy, his present unfortunate position being due to Ids having been deceived into the belief that he would be allowed to operate in his own way. It is notorious that Napoleou was from the first opposed to Italian unity, and preferred Italy in two kingdoms ; or a federation of the States, with the Pope nominally placed at the head. In contemplating Garibaldi's ill-timed expedition, what probable consequences do we behold ? Had he reached Rome, a collision with the French was inevitaole ; there would then have been an irruption of Austria into Lombardy ; the occupation of Sicily by England, and other results going far to bring about a general European war. We must, therefore, take it as a mercy that the deluded General was arrested in his onward march, however Aye may lament the penalty he pays; for it is now proved beyond question that tbe executive and the army of the kingdom of Italy can maintain tranquility and defend Rome and the spiritual powers of the Pope quite as well as French troops. The papers of all nations now plead to Napoleon to relieve Europe at once from this hated " foreign occupation." Rumour says that this appeal has been attended to, and thatthe occupation is to cease in September 1863. Should this report prove true it may probably silence the drily clamour, and yet leave the sagacious Emperor a wide margin for further com pi i cations, In the meantime the wounded warrior is more popular than ever ; nowhere is he looked upon aa a criminal, everywhere is he offered a home. The English papers invite him openly and heartily, and promise him such a welcome as is given but to few ; and our very celebrated surgeon, Dr Partridge, has been sent by public subscription to tend bis wounds—accompanied by an autograph letter of introduction, from Lord Palmerston, by which means the Doctor obtained instant admission to the captive chieftain. We now have a continuation of bulletins, which may be relied on. The last one states that that the inner right ankle is broken, but that with extreme care and quiet the limb may be saved ; that unfortunately the patient is subject to gout, and tbat there is clanger from erysipelas, and that there is much debility, caused by spare living and great anxiety. But our English doctor has introduced fresh air and cleanliness—things which had not previously occurred to the minds of the eminent Italian faculty as at all necessary. Altogether, Dr Partridge reports favorably, and relies much on the cheerful disposition of the sufferer, who smokes hi 3 pipe contentedly, and utters not a groan to tell his agony, nor a sigh of impatience or irritability ; and on the occasion of interviews with his dearest relatives and friends, his principal anxiety is for the welfare and comfort of his unfortunate followers. Ifc is not surprising that such a hero as this should be so popular °- and that the sympathy should be so general. It is even reported that Princess Pia Maria " who is about; to wed the King of Portugal, is resolved to be married in the name of Maria only, and to drop her first name, winch was given in honor of her godfather the Pope ; hoping thus to testify her disapproval of the Papal policy, and her affection for Italy's noblest son. At present vast preparations are going on for the trial, it being too good a thing for the lawyers to relinquish hastily, but the prevalent idea is that there will be none. Much importance was attached to

certain papers supposed to bein Garibaldi's possession, ancl whicli Cialdini was anxious to secure, but Colonel Pallavicini could only discover two documents, which were carefully analysed and declared not to be those so particularly wanted ; and it is also believed that Garibaldi on his trial will make such disclosures as might be equally unpleasant for Napoleon to hear, and Victor Emanuel to explain. Oue thing is quite clear, that poor Garibaldi has been made the catspaw of exalted personages who ought to know better; ancl I hope next mail to send you a somewhat satisfactory finale to this distressing subject, together with the glad tidings that the suffering hero is out of all danger, and well nigh over his troubles.

The American struggle at last gets into shape. For a long time it was neither easy nor pleasant to follow the tortuous course of this protracted shame on civilisation; this foul blot on humanity ; this thorough disgrace to our degenerate descendants ; and before I touch on the present relative position of parties ifc may be as well to look at their proceedings since my last letter. We there found each side making iranfcic efforts to fight to the death, and it was feared that the excesses already practised in this barbarous war, were as nothing compared with those to come—the combatants became more savage daily—there was mutual fury and exasperation, quarter neither asked nor given ; distinction between public and private property, between combatants ancl noncombatants entirely forgotten ; and the merits of a general estimated on the Oriental principle by the amount of iife destroyed and desolation left behind. We found the Federal commanders Butler, Mitchell, Pope, Hooper and others, giving free and unbounded license of barbaric pillage to their dissolute soldiery, and we painfully read ofthe demoniacal horrors attending their progress of successful invasion, and of the. horrid privations of peaceable citizens and their hapless families. Iv some cities tbey passed through, there was not left a carpet or a single article of use or comfort that could possibly "be converted into blankets or clothing for the army; and we fain hoped such conduct was confined "to on • side of the quarrel, 'till the Southern President issued his recent proclamation of reprisals. Lincoln having organised several regiments of black soldiers, Davis decreed that all those captured should be sold as slaves, and their white officers instantly hanged ; other severe clauses in this proclamation at once destroyed the Southern character for humanity as contrasted with tbeir barbarous enemy; and to cope with the enormous levies of his adversary, Mr Davis extends the a^e of conscripts from 19 to 45,—while the high bounty offered by tbe North, was slowly filling their wasted ranks : aud tbus the two armies were being manufactured for another campaign of horrors. In nearly all the Stales, domiciliary ' visits and midnight arrests, without crime, and without accuser, were of frequent occurrence, as in fo. mer days of European Revolutions and Inquisitions. The gaol filled fast, and free speech and free thought were alike dangerous to practice ; and all this in the model Republic, the vaunted land of liberty and equality in the year of grace 18G2. Kentucky, Tennessee, and other border States assumed neutrality, and thus happily escaped this frightful tyranny ; and they are supposed to be of such vast importance to either side as to have it in their power to stem the current of this sanguinary war by throwing tlieir "weight in either scale. They have consequently been left comparatively unscathed, receiving flattering overtures in abundance from North and South, it being considered of vital importance to secure their adhesion ; and until the events of last month these Border States have been but little engaged in active operations ; in fact tbis seems the stake of the Avar. This can be better explained by quoting from the last census, whicli gives 29 millions of inhabitants in the whole United States, i.e., Northern States 12 millions, Southern States 9 millions, and Border States 8 millions. Meanwhile Peace Societies sprung up, and the speakers boldly asked whether the time had not arrived for a friendly mediation ; and surely the events of the last few weeks woulcl induce any other nation to lay aside their blood-stained weapons and turn from this wholesale butchery to arts of peace and progress. It is now clear, that from the time of the Federal defeat before Richmond, McClellan has gradually retreated, the Confederates closely following. Many severe battles have been fought; the Confederates have in turn become the Invaders, and the Federals now occupy precisely the same position round Washington, as they did before their departure for the-peninsula: and curiously' enough their very last defeat on 29th ultimo occurred afc Bull's Run, where they cut; such a sorry figure 14 months ago. Ifc was also accompanied by equally disgraceful conduct: the officers hastily quitting the scene of disaster for a place of safety, and quietly sitting down to dinner, and the dead and wounded lying for 7 days unburied and untended within 20 miles of the City of Washington. But the crisis of this internecine war seems at hand ; as, judging from present appearances and the close proximity ofthe two armies in the neighborhoood of the capital, all literally may depend on ono battle. With the Confederate soldiers commanded by generals eminently vigilant and energetic, co operating with each other with mechanical exactness, and pursuing a plan of action, apparently devised by some master mind, and flushed at ith continued success ; with the dispirited Federals beaten back to their original position, after many months of hard fighting, and once more under the chief command of M'Clellan, Avho is supposed to be but lukewarm in this serious business ; at all events the fact is patent that " Victory does not sit upon bis helm," and he is supposed to be at heart a Southerner, — Avith public opinion so strongly expressed, that Pope, M'Dowell, and other generals, are removed from command—with a panic at NeAv York, and the enemy thundering at the city gates —it looks as though a few more Aveeks must bring this dire tragedy to an end. However, come the issue when it will, the policy of non-intervention adopted by England and France, will be duly appreciated, for sooner or later, sheer exhaustion must convince one or other of the hostile parties that their strength has been sorely tried and fairly tested ; and a separation of the States thus achieved, can admit of no further question, as to the rights of each to govern themselves according to their OAvn laws and customs. The question of slavery is scarcely worth an argument, for President Lincoln expressly states he cares nothing about it, his object being solely to preserve the Union ; to which end he would at once free all the colored race, and give them rights of citizenship ; or he would rivet their chains for ever, as the case might require ; and we all well know that without slave labor the produce of the country could nofc be raised. Lincoln's memorable speech to the free negroes a,little while back,will nofc be soon forgotten, Avhercin he told them that whites and blacks could not possibly live together on equality, and that tbey had better part; at the samd time offering to colonize them in Central America —and yet Aye now find 50,000 negroes in the Federal ranks. The Confederates fight for independence, which according to the articles of the constitution, they claim to be entitled to : and this simple question, which should have been amicably settled, is injudiciously magnified into such proportions that their fine country is laid waste, their citizens slaughtered and demoralised, and the whole Avorld literally horrified.

Ow poor sheep in the Western districts are unfortunately suffering from a destructive disease known as the small pox ; thousands have already perished ; but avc hope the precautions noAv being taken Avill pre\ rent an extension of this sad calamity.

The International Exhibition still displays its Avonders to admiring thousands, though a glance at the nave on the exclusive days of 2s 6d, tells one that the famous London season of 1862 draAvs to an end; ravishing toilets and superlative SAvells get fewer and feAver, and the quoted long list of distinguished foreigners is rapidly declining ; and while our Counties of the South, East, and West, still contribute so largely to the Metropolitan population, Aye deplore the unhappy state of our Northern Counties prohibiting their just quota. October 18th Avas originally fixed as the closing day, but it is uoav determined to keep open till November lst, on the present terms, and then to allow tAvo more weeks afc increased prices, to enable exhibitors to dispose of their goods. This last resolve completes the contrast between the two Exhibitions of 1851 and 1862, and finally Btampg the commercial mark upon tlie present un-

dertaking. It is liopedthcreby to save, the guarantors harmless ; but it is expected they will be called upon for a deficit of £20,000 or £30,000. This large balance, on ths wrong side of the ledger, is attributed to bad management from the very beginning. As yet, the returns are not authenticated, but t!r;y give five millions of visitors, and £400,000 cash ; and, according to agreement, the contractors are to receive all monies taken between £400,000 and £500,000. Much surprise is expressed that these large takings do not cover the expenses, and folks call to mind the surplus at the close cf the former Exhibition, a surplus so immense that much perplexity arose as what sbould be done with ifc. But whether this uusatisfactory result be owing to extravagance, or jobbery, or something worse, it will no doubt be fully explained hereafter. The foreign refreshment contract was given without due enauiry to M. Veillard, who from want of means, or'brains, has failed in his undertaking, and the proceedings in bankruptcy will probably somewhat enlighten the public. He admits paying L2OOO or L3OOO head money to the honorable Mr Cadogan, for for procuring bim the contract—that he was not up to his work—that his servants robbed him wholesale—and that he had only a few hundred pounds to commence with. There has been another unseemly squabble between the Commissioners, tiie Artist,jand the Stereoscopic Company, respecting the celebrated statue,"The reading Girl." This beautiful object was, for a long time, doomed to sackcloth and .ashes ; hideous placards by the contending parties struggling for prominence, and bringing much additional odium oh the devoted heads of the authorities; but this scandal has happily died out, and Sigor Magni's production is now one of the principal attractions.

Our unfortunate northern operatives still contentedly bear their severe privations, which] are nevertheless most generously attended to by the world at large. All over the country are subscriptions forwarded and collected, from a penny to a pound. Clothing is liberally furnished for the Lancashire lasses, and schooling provided for the children. Tlie men flock to London in search of employment, und some of them are formed into creditable musical bands. All hearts are open to tide the patient sufferers over their calamity; foreign contributions come in apace, and the munificent sum of Ll 0,000 has been sent from the antipodes. The Times, 'in advocating tbis deserving case, has severely commented on the fact of«ome extensive mill owners' names not appearing in the list, and when the defaulters foolishly expressed indignation at tbe liberty taken, and attempted to explain what their (jood intention's were when the proper time arrived—tbe bold Thunderer quietlyobserved that no names bad been mentioned ; fuels only bad been dealt with, mid that a final appeal to their shame was the only course left. Whether this will have the desired effect is to be proved; the manufaeturers.siill remain open to a suspicion of indifference to the suffering artisans, while intent on tbeir own aggrandisement. But the public are determined on relieving the present distress and obviating it for the future. The Manchester Cotton Supply Association are hard at work, and have just now brought serious charges against Sir C, Wood, the Indian Secretary, for not carrying out Lord Canning's suggestions, which would have facilitated tlie supply from that quarter —and an idea is afloat that a substitute for cotton has been lately discovered which abounds on the sea shore, and can be obtained in any quantity, from the entire coast of Great Britain. Mr Henry Harben, of London, is the ingenious patentee of this wonderful article, but ifc would be premature to indulge in tlie luxury of felicitation, as it has yet to be practically tested. While on Lancashire affairs I may notice the Preston Guild, lately celebrated for one entire week. Strong objections were urged against an exhibition of this kind amidst the present gloomy prospects of the North ; but such a peculiar custom as tbis could scarcely be put aside, and indeed the chances are that ifc must have done much good by encouraging the circulating medium, large subscriptions, &c. Earl Derby's presence did much towards its success, and in one of his happiest speeches he offered a large premium to any one who could utilise with pecuniaiy profit the liquid sewage of the district.

I can report no improvement in our social state, The infamous garotters ply their dreadful avocations with increased energy, and nightly victims are the result. Next session, vigorous measures will-be adopted with regard to a revision of the criminal code, and it is hoped that Avhile such beneficial efforts are bestowed on tbe physical drainage of our cities, the moral drainage of the country will not be left entirely to the mercy of quacks. At the convict- establishments afc Dartmoor, Portsmouth, &c, not a week passes but warders are mutilated or murdered; and shocking scenes of blood are continually occurring amongst the prisoners themselves. Surely it would not be difficult to adopt a classification whereby confirmed ruffianism should be separated from criminals of a lesser degree; and it cannot yet be too late to find a statesman competent to grapple with this ahuming subject. Infanticide, too, is now assuming aAvful dimensions, and Dr Laukcster (avlio succeeded the late Coroner Wakley) is most energetic in his denunciations of this crime, and in his constant appeal to the authorities; and Aye hope through him to have some attention paid to the urgent wants of real foundling hospitals.

The trial of Wm. Roupcll, Esq., ex M.P. for Lambeth, took place yesterday. Afc first, the gentleman refused to plead, although he bad so openly confessed his villany before Judge Martin, at the Guilford trial; but when he Avas satisfied that the family had completed their arrangements Avith tbe victims of his malpractices, he condescended to plead guilty, and made a long penitential speech. He Avas duly rewarded with penal servitude for life—bis family netting about £200,000 by the job ; aud this is the ho:° orable gentleman who, before a committee of the House of Commons, Avith virtuous indignation exclaimed Avith a loud voice, he Avould " knock doAvn the slanderer Avho could accuse him of bribery, dishonesty, or corruption."' What a martyr !

The immense number of English ships annually lost has caused much inquiry of late, and there Avas recently a trial at Liverpool, "Jamieson, captain v. Ruxton, shipowner," Avhich elicited some startling facts. It Avas a case of rogues disagreeing over the spoil. The plaintiff had been engaged to do much dirty work for defendant in the shape of scuttling ships thafc Avere Avell insured, and Avas driven to his remedy afc laAv for compensation. The model captain's evidence Avas replete AA-ith edification, if Avanting in morality, and Mr sliipoAvner Ruxton speedily found himself in the felon's dock, and has yet to ansAver for his manifold sins ; Captain Jamieson being retained by Lloyd's agents as a sort of ferret to bring some more of these abominable ship-rats within reach of justice. Perhaps tbe sharp-nosed captain can seenfc one G, C. Calvert, Esq., British Consul at the Dardanelles, avlio has long been Avauted to-answer why he imagined a ship and its cargo, and insured such imagination for £12,000, —then imagined the ship on fire at sea, —then tried to realise the reward of his fertile imagination, but failed and fled; but no doubt Aye shall soon hear more of these sea-monsters.

The Bank of England note paper robbery is still undiscovered, despite the large reAvard offered. In the meantime, spurious notes are circu ated freely ; they arrive at the Bank in shoals, from the Continent and from America. There was evidently no time lost by the robbers Avhen once they got possession of the official paper, and it does nofc redound much to the credit of our police that this extensive swindle should baffle them so long. Her Majesty and the royal children are in Germany. The Prince of Wales stayed in toAvn to superintend the fitting up of Marlborough House, destined shortly to receive our future Queen. His Royal Highness had previously purchased a large estate in Norfolk, called Sandrinham Hall, for £250,000, and he has iioav joined the royal family, his bride elect, the Danish Princess, being likewise one of the party. This marriage is looked on with general satisfaction, as being in every respect eligible, and one of real affection ; and it is expected, our own Albert Edward,/ having already put his house in order, will, in due course, settle soberly doAvn as any other respectable British paterfamilias, and thafc his virtuous Court will tend to obliterate from recollection that ofthe last Prince of Wales, and be a pattern to the world, The nation rejoices

at. this prospect of anqtherhappy marriage of one of the Royal children ; and" when tlie trip to Germany is brought to a close, Aye all hope to see our beloved Queen Victoria in her Avon ted health once more, and that she may think fit to discard the habiliments of Avoe, and resume the active duties of her exalted station, thereby bringing a revival of trade so long depressed. By this time, it is hoped, the second detachment of colonists for Albert Land have arrived safely. The Wm. Miles left the London Docks two months ago with nearly 400 emigrants, avlio Avill no doubt, be joyfully received by their predecessors; others are yet to follow. The ConAvay sailed from Southampton a month afterAvards with about the same number, for Brisbane, Queensland. On the 15th instant 240 emigrants of a superior class sailed from Ireland in the Duke of Newcastle, for the same place. Since then the Pladda left Glasgow with 367 emigrants for Otago. Ancl v subscription is now on foot to send out as emigrants to the Antipodes, a very large number of the distressed Lancashire operatives. All tbis looks well, tbe people are drifting to places where they are Avanted, and let but favorable accounts come back from these pilgrims —how they Avere received and cared for, and many thousands will cheerfully exchange a hopeless struggle for their daily bread, in the overcrowded mother country, for healthful toil and reasonable prospect?, in our distant settlements. One of our celebrated jockies has just died— "Little Jack Charlton," rendered famous by winnine the Derby and Oaks on Blink Bonny, He was then indeed a hero, but lost his laurels when he rode the same mare on the St. Ledger day following. Ifc Avas, at that time supposed no living thing on four legs could beat her, but from some mysterious agency ifc " did'nt come off" and the hapless jock Avas nearly torn to pieces by the infuriate mob. The little fellow used to ride at Gst 101b, and Avas much sought after. Few 3'oungsfcrs ever won'more crack races, and he might- have died rich had he been cautious with his betting-book • that Aras a stumbling block with bim, as with others of his class, and poor little Jack, like many of his betters, came to grief.

Our great St. Leger has just been Avon by young Challoner for the Hon. Mr Hawke, on the favorite, the Marquis, beating the next favorite Buekstone,by a short head, witli Clarissa colt for a third. Ifc will be remembered that Challoner Avon the St. Leger last year on Caller Ou ; he also Avon the Ooaks on Feu de joie. The Doncaster week can boast this year of the finest racing on record, an immense company, and gloiious weather. The Grand Stand receipts alone readied near £5,000. The Great Yorkshire Handicap was won by Lord St. Vincent's Cowley, and the Doncaster Cup by Lord AViiliam Paulett's Tim Whifller, who was backed against the field.

Mr Tom Sayers-is giving farewell performances, prior to visiting the Antipodes, and should he come your Avay you must pay him all honor, or ho wiii be mightily offended, for the gallant Tom is a great man now. He boasts of his thousands, and talks largely of " the hundred thousand Australian contract"

The cricket senson here has terminated with a Avind-up match betAveen Surrey and an All England Eleven, in which the Surrey Avere signallydefeated,'their opponents scoring the unprecedented number of 503 in one innings. This match Avas rendered remarkable by the umpire, Lilly white, objecting to Wiiisher's boAvling. The cricket law No. 10, prohibits " high bowling," and as Wiiisher's style is decidedly " hand over elbow," and he persisted in ifc, the the umpire "no balled" him, Avhich caused much confusion; but ifc is understood there will speedily be a revision of the cricket laws; the English batsmen are now becoming so formidable as to defy ordinary bowling, however severe. We have received another invitation from Melbourne for an English eleven to start next September, under the Captaincy of George Parr, and should its results be equal to the last, all parties concerned will be well satisfied.

We have recently lost two Archbishops, the Lords Primate of England and Ireland. In the sister isle the lucrative post was immediately assigned to another Bcresford; but there are so many candidates for the English vacancy, that friend Pam is sorely puzzled'what to do Avith the rich gift ; and although the good Bishop Sumner has been dead nearly a month, tbe new Archbishop of Canterbury has yet to be chosen. The Earl of Ellesrnere has just died, aged 40, and Charles Pearson, the Cijfcy Solicitor, aged 69, NeAvs has been received recently of the death of Mrs Livingstone, in Africa ;'sho had only joined her husband a few montlis previously, and this must prove a grievous affliction to the worthy and benevolent Doctor.

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LONDON., Otago Daily Times, Issue 290, 25 November 1862

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5,156

LONDON. Otago Daily Times, Issue 290, 25 November 1862

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