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Macbeth was produced for the first time at the Theatre Royal on Satnrday evening. Notwithstanding the inclemency of the weather the house was well filled, and the performance went of exceedingly well. Mr. Holt, as « Macbeth," evinced a correct conception of the character and played with much judgment. Mrs. Holt to whom had been allotted the difficult part of "Lady Macbeth," gave on tlie whole a very careful delineation of the character, and evinced great powers as a tragic actress. The subordinate parts were very well sustained by the company, Mr. "J. M. Wolf playing, « Macduff," with great ability. We must express our satisfaction at the excellent manner in which the vocal part of the incidental music was given, particularly in the incantation scene, in which Miss Montrose's Toice was very conspicuous. The afterpiece, " Wagtail and Bobtail," kept the house in roars of laughter. Miss Mathews, as " Mrs. Wagtail," gave her part with great humour, and Mr. R. li. Dale as '-Bobtail," and Mr. O'Brien as " Wagtail," excited the visible faculties of the audience, by their severe practical jokes upoa each other. Romeo and Juliet and the farce Of " J°'"n Wapps ; or from information I've received," are the pieces announced for this evening's performance. Mr. Barny Sullivan, the tragedian, arrived in Melbourne on the 25th ult., from England. The ploughing match of the Agricultural Society at Tokomairiro, is fixed to take place oa Wednesday next. We observe that Captain Macgregor, 65th Regiment, has been appointed Resident Magisj trate in the Native District of Raglan. Speaking of his appointm mt, the Daily Southern Crou says ;_'• Captain Macgregor proceeds to Raglan in troublesome times. We hope he may succeed in pacifying the n itives, but we fear the gallant Captain will find his temper sorely tried, and the dignity of his office made light of by those people oa whose behalf lie has been appointed to lahour." Tiie Melbourne Lender say-? : —'• Following the ex tuple set by Mr. Henry Miller, another company has been initiated for the purpose of buying up the agrifut<iral lands of the colony as soo-i as they are proclaimed open for selection. Tiiis segmd c^upany !;a? b-cn formed under the auspices uf Mr. Hugh Glass, and a meeting of the provisional committee was held yesterday. The locali-.v fixed for the operations of Mr. Miller's company is the Western district ; the lan ito bo selected-has been already fixed up-iii, and includes the fine agricultural areas in*the neighborhood of the Wannon. Thi nominal capital is one million, and the subscribed one hundred thousand pounds." The Art?us of July 26. says -.—« Her Majesty's *htt> Pelorus left Sydney on July 20th and proceed el on her voyage to England. The Sydney Morni.y Herald of |hl- 21st says : ' This splendid -hip, since her stay ia port, has proved a source of attraction to hundreds of the citizens, who wiil n.it readily forget the courtesy aad attention which have ever marked the conduct of her otlk-crs when visiting this noble frigate.' " The Auckland Chamber of Commerce affords i contrast to the ap«hy manifested by the lP.ine.lin Chamber. At a recent meeting, the Auckland Chamber of- Commerce resolved— '• i'iiat a special committee of th_» Chamber be oppointed to consider the propriety of hav s ag .•Luis.-- prepare! to be aided to the • Imprison" meat ior Debt Act, ISG2,' having chiefly in view the enabling o: th.' principal creditors, as regards atmunt of debts due, tJ take the mana'-ens.'at of insolvent debtors' a'd'airs in t'-eir hands a^ trustees, an 1 unking their acts binding oa die re-' mai-nng creditors iv any such insolvent estate." In the Australian Sc:rs of July 25 appears a wood cut which is supposed to represent •' lumbering timlier iv a Kauri pine forest," and which it is stated in the accompanying letter press s "sketched from nature." We can only say that the artist who sketched such a picture from nature must have seen nature through a distorting medium of a remarkable kind. The scene is mid in a forest, and represents a number of naked savages dragging a squared log of timber over rollers by means of ropes and pulleys. The £iuh_ in the picture are patent to everyone who has ever seen a kauri forest or natives at work. To specify them all would take too long, but we may mention a few. In the first place the kauri tree's grow straight up perpendicularly, and not in every direction ; in the next, they have a very handsome heavy head, not a mere top knotas represented. Then the natives working at lumbering would be clad in moleskin trousers, &c, like other working men; moreover, they would not put the log on rollers, baton rough skids. The other trees are equally incorrect with tiie kauri; indeed the remark of a competent judge of the subject on seeing the print was that he would not have known that the scene was laid in New Zealand at all if he had not been told. The letter press is equally incorrect. For example, the writer speaks of the kauri pine growing where the insufficiency of the soil would seem to render ie impossible for a tree of the size to find nourishment. The writer is evidently not aware that the kauri, sends down a large tap root, which indeed is its principal root, to a great depth, nnd thus exhausts the soil. Again, he speaks of the-difficulty of extinguishing bush fires in kauri forests. Now it is well known that the undcrscru* ofakaur.» forest is extraordinarily humid, and that the growing kauri tree eminot b# set fire to. The gum, however, that exudes from wounds in the tree is inflammable. It is a tact that dead fallen kauri trees if once set fire to will burn for a | long time. The kauri gum of com mcrce, we should meutiou, is not obtained from the trees, j but is dug up from land where the trees are supposed to have formerly flourished. We have T noticed this wood cut and description thus parti- ! cularly, not because of any peculiar importance that attaches to it, but because, it is an instance that illustrates in a remarkable manner the extreme vagueness and incorrectness of the accounts that find currency in the press, even ia meighboring colonies, of matters of fact. Can ft he wondered at that at the other side of the world the most extraordinary uriseouceptieas should pre* vail

Mails close for Lyttelton and Christchurch, by Geelong, at 9.30 o'clock,a.m. to-day. Cochran M'Dowell, the driver of the Express waggon which was upset at Saddle Hill, on Friday evening, was, on Saturday, brought before the Resident Magistrate, charged with the manslaughter of the two women whose lives were sacrificed on that occasion. He was remanded until the result of the inquest should be known. It was intended tha^ the inquest should be field on Saturday, but we understand that it has heen postponed until to-day. The long anticipated billiard match, which has created so much interest amongst all lovers ofthe game, takes place 'this evening. M r . Lamb, of Victorian celebrity, is to play a match of 10G ' up with a gentleman amateur, Mr. Townsend ; and from the known proficiency of both playerr, it is expected that there will be a display of skill not before witnessed in the colonies. Both the gentlemen have been practising during the week on anew table expressly provided for the purpose, and judging from the science exhibited by both players, a most exciting and interesting match may be anticipated. Arrangments have been made in the Theatre to enable all the spectators to have a good view of the game, and from the great interest manifested iv the match, a large company is expected to assemble. We paid a casual visit to the Princess Theatre on Saturday. Rapid progress has been made in the renovation of the building, and it is probable the alterations will be sufficiently advanced for the contemplated opening on this day week. The decorations of the ceiling are being proceeded with, and from what we could judge of the work already completed, will be very artistic and elegant. The two gala box^s on each side of the proscenium are exceedingly roomy and convenient, and the other parts ofthe house are admirably constructed. The taraeness which has characterised the Bruce election from the commencement, continued to the close. The Poll' was decla.ed on Saturday. The total numbers were 74 for Cargill, and 54 for Baldwin. In Dunedin Sir. Cargill had a majority of 45, but in the country districts Captain Baldwin had a majority of 25—thus reducing the absolute majority for Mr. Cargill to 20. We observe that the various agricultural associations in the province of Auckland, have resolved io amalgamate themselves into a society under the title of "The New Zealand Agricultural Society." The efforts of the societyare to be directed to the holding of an annual show at Auckland, and to the encouragement of improvements in stock breeding and farming generaUy. It has been suggested also that in connection with the society, there should be an agricultural museum established in Auckland, where new- comers might at once see the capabilities of the different varieties of soil under different modes of treatment. We mentioned .some days ago that there was a rush reported between Black's and Lowe's stations, but it appears to have been an error. Mr. Lowe has two stations, and the one on which the rush is, is not near Mr. Black's. We are not in a position to say positively how large the rush is, or whether it promises to turn out well. It is situated on the <jole Creek. Beyond vague rumor, we can only give our readers the following extract from a letter from Waikouaiti, kindly placed at our disposal by His Honor the Deputy Superintendent. The letter was dated July iiSth, so that the " last Friday" the writer mentions refers to Friday week. If the rush had been of much good, one would think that in the interval further accounts would have been received. With these remarks we leave our readers to judge for theniieives ofthe extract referred to:—" Statement of Mr. Oxley, clerk to Mr. Jones, July 28th, 18G2. A man came into our store to-day, and stated that he had just returned from Cole Creek Station, and that gold had been found within 3 miles of Mr. Lowe's house. A rush had taken place in consequence ; and, when he left on Friday morning last, there were about 150 diggers at work,—all appeared to be doing well. The shepherd's boy was working with a tin dish, and getting about 12 grains to the dish. Report says that a number of men arc coming overland from Tnapeka. Tlie man who gave the report to me offered 2 oz. and 9 dwts. for sale, the produce of two or three days' work jfor two men. Surfacedigging,—roots of grass, &c, all washed. The gold appears to be very fine and bright, mixed 'with a good deal of sand."

The districts of Tokomairiro and Waihola are soon, it appears to have the advantage ofthe presence of a clergyman of the Church of England A meeting was held at Tokomairiro, on Wednesday last, at whicli it was decided to raise the sum of Lloo for the purpose of defraying the expenses of the passage of a clergyman. Mr. W. C. Young was present as a deputation from the Rural Deanery Board, and stated that there were two clergymen willing to come over from Australia, so that there was no absolute necessity for sending to England. Another^ meeting is to be held on the 12th instant. The Rebecca, which arrived nt this port on Thursday, brought thirty-two head of cattle from Wellington, consigned to. Messrs. Driver, Maclean and Co., of this town. The cattle have beeu landed in splendid condition, and great credit is due to Mr. W. J. Byrne, in whose charge the cattle were placed. We notice, among the arrivals for the new company at the Royal Princess' Theatre, the name of Mr. I\. W. Kohler, known in theatrical " circles, as the hero of a hundred instru- " ments." We had the pleasure of being intimately acquainted with this gentleman's performances in England some years ago, when his concerts proved a great feature in the attractions of the Queen of watering places, Scarborough, and we cau well remember the great interest which Mr. Kohlcr's accomplishments on almost every instrument, created at that time. Mr. Kohler is a most accomplished musician ancl a composer of no mean order, and the music loving portion of the community may anticipate a great treat lrom his varied performances. The late frosty weather has been followed by a succession of very heavy rains, which have converted tbe streets of Dunedin into perfect rivers of liquid mud. As might have been expected, the wet has very much retarded out-door operations of every kind, and put a stop to the cuttings and other works in connection with the formation of new streets. Landslips have occurred in various places, aud a somewhat serious one took place early yesterday morning, on the main south road near to Mr. Cargill's house. A large quantity of earth fell, and covered the road for a distance of about 100 feet. A laborer, in the employ of the Town Board, was engaged during the morning clearing away the earth, so as to iorm a narrow j track for foot passengers, and a sufficient space was cleared during the afternoon to admit of a Tehicle. passing. A constable vrvs stationed in the Ticinity last night to prevent an accident.

There seems to be no end to the list of disputed Maon titles to land. We learn from the AuckUnd papers that a native rejoicing in the name o Heteraka Takapuna, has come forward with a clami to a block of land at Oraki, for which a jargo sum of money is about to be paid by the Government to another chief. A great deal of wet weather has been experienced on the Victorian diggings. The Argus ot the 29th ult. says:-" It does not seem long since the miners were complaining sadly of the want of water, and hot they are suffering seriously in many places from a superabundance of this element. Not only arc all the flats near the creeks and rivers flooded, with the usual amount ot damage to the claims thereon, but the countryis so soft everywhere, from the long-continued rain, that the carting of stuff to the water, and of stone to the mills, as well as of timber from the forests, has become difficult, aud in places .altogether impossible- until the floods have subsided.

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Bibliographic details

Otago Daily Times, Otago Daily Times, Issue 204, 4 August 1862

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2,458

Otago Daily Times Otago Daily Times, Issue 204, 4 August 1862

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