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The condition of the pavement outside the Opera House last night was indescribably disgusting in consequence of tlio pollution by the spitting fraternity. Now that it is definitely known that such filtli often contains the germs, of serious diseases which are thus disseminated by being inhaled or consumed with our butcher's meat, or milk,_ it ought not to be necessary to remind the police that it is their duty to make an .example of the offenders. It is impossible to understand _ why young men who desire to be considered manly and respectable should find it such an infatuating pastime to thus defile' the pavement; but it was done on such a ivholosale scale last night that there would have been no difficulty in detecting some of the culprits. The death of Mr Alfred Cox, which took place a few days ago in Christchurch has not attracted adequate'attention. Mr Cox, who was born in Australia. was a prominent figure in the earliest days of the settlement of New Zealand. • Ho was one of . a small band of enterprising and substantial colonisers, and a public-spirited man, inspired by the highest ideals as to his duties towards society. He reared a large family, and his household were intimately connected with social' affairs during the many years they resided near Hamilton, Waikato, where was situated the swamp which Mr. Cox, in partnership with Mr Williamson (one of the original Bank of New Zealand directors) endeavored to transform into culr tivable land. The failure of this scheme was a bitter trial to a man of Mr Cox's temperament, and he retired from active life and settled in Canterbury. Mrs Cox, who predeceased her husband many, years ago, t was an accomplished piauiste and-musician-of the old school, and, as Mr Cox was also a flute-player, their musical capabilities were often, in the. early days, exercised for the entertainment, of friends or the benefit of some; charity. Territorial officers under the compulsory ' training scheme have duties manifold and varied, and General Godley showed that he was aware of th ; s when addressing the ' citizens' meeting last night. At the camp, ]he said, they discussed the duties which officers would have to undertake, and after a long list had been gone through the General asked if anything had been omitted. /Whereat one-officer rose and remarked "Yes, I think we have forgotten something. You've forgotten to give us about an hour a day to attend to our business, and; earn our bread and butter."

Since : the _ last meeting of the" Caledonian Society it has been felt by those responsible for the affairs of that body that the Society could not continue in its present financial condition. Accordingly on Tuesday night a meeting of directors was held in the office of the Secretary (Mr H. F. Gibson) to consider the question of finance. Mr John Vernor presided, and there were 13 other directors present. After ■ 'discussions notice was given-of tha following motion to considered at a general meeting of tho dire> . tors it is lmoossary that the grounds and assets be sold to bring funds to meet the liability of the Society, and that members be called toJ gether to consider this recommendation." The following were constituted a sub-committee to prepare a report for submission to the general meetingsMessrs J. Vernor, J. !>• Grant, \\. Robertson, J. Henderson, A. J. Grave, J. Mahoney, G. Livingstone, and A. M The flag was flying on the Post Office to-day, and flags were flown on all other Government buildings m commemoration of Queen Mary's birtnday. The Post and Telegraph Department will observe the King's Birthday on Saturdav. June 3rd. Dunedrn and Timaru have resolved to observe the

holiday on the 3rd. The matter has. not yet been definitely decided in Oamaru.

After meritorious and honorable service covering a period of about SO years the North Otago Mounted Rifles last , night ceased to exist—at least so far as the old squadron is concerned. Jt happened after the parade at the Drill Hall. General Godley had addressed the troops with particular reference to the "Mounteds" and their decision to leave the Territorial force. When the General had left the hall Major Macdonald and Captain Orbell also spoke to the men. On being called upon to make their decision, the men almost unanimously elected to leave the corps, the new conditions of service interfering with their work. It is now about 30 years - since a contingent of the. Otago Hussars was formed in NoEtli Otago. That was the beginning of the Mounted Rifles, but they were not Mounted; Rifles then, nor for some years later. The contingent continued for some years, until, as the Volunteer movement spread it was found advisable to form a separate squadron entitled the North Otago Hussars. The" first commanding officer was Captain Ghaffey, afterwards Colonel commanding the Ist Regiment Canterbury, Mounteds, and: now Brigadier of the Canterbury Mounted: Brigade. During his captaincy it was found advisable to change the corps from a purely cavalry arm to mounted rifles, just then coming into prominence as an arm of the service. This was about twenty years ago. tinder the new designation of the North Otago Mounted Rifles a very strong company was formed, andi was the first mounted company in New Zealand to appear in khaki, which was then almost unknown. On Captain Chaffey's removal from the district the command was taken over by Captain J. Qowie Nichols, now Brigadier of the Mounted Brigade in Otago. On Captain Nichols' promotion the company passed into the capable hands of Captain A. L. Gillies, who retained the command until his removal to the North Island. He was succeeded by Captain G. W. Macdonald, now Major of the Ist Regiment of Otago Mounteds. After his removal to Dunedin, Captain Macdonald, out of consideration for the corps, continued in the captaincy for some, years, but on his promotion to the majority the company was taken over by Captain H. S. • Orbell, under whom its career has been one of . uninterrupted prosperity. Throughout the long career the company has preserved those high traditions inculcated by the first commanders. Its history has been one of a long "Vitai Lampada," those who had; played; the game and passed from the ranks flinging to those behind a torch burning brightly with the light of military discipline, etiquette, and the efficiency that springs therefrom. To all interested in tlio company —and by supplying an effective force in. training and reserve the company has merited the interest of all—to all, therefore, it- must be a matter for deep regret that the last link of the torch chain has been forged. A, strange custom of salting newborn bailies is still practised in certain remote regions of Europe and Asia. The mother imagines that this custom brings health and strength to her children, and serves to keep away evil spirits as well. Among the Armenians of Russia it is the custom to cover-the entire skin of the infant with very fine salt. This is left on the baby for three * -hours or more 3 when it is washed off. with warm water. The women of a mountain tribe of Asia Minor are even more peculiar, for they are alleged to keep their new-born babies covered with salt for a period of 24 hours. The modern Greeks also sprinkle their babies with salt, and even in certain parts of Germany salt is still used on a clula at birth.

Have you tried Zymole Trokeys? If vou haven't, get a box and be convinced that tbev are the best throat relief on the market. They stimulate the secretions and refresh the mouth.

Mrs J. E. Batson, having purchased the business carried, on by Hemsley Burnet, Ltd., will open rooms on June Ist in Wear street, next Familton Bros. 747

For Influenza take Woods' Great Peppermint Cur©. Never Is 6d, 2s 6d.

Sale of Bargains.—Now on at H Greiifell's. See the Tweed Trousers at 3s lid. See the Shirts, Singlets, and Pants at 2s lid. Biggest and best bargains procurable. Fresh Bargains this week at Aikenhead's Mill End Sale. 679

A good rubbing of the chest and back with ROCHE'S Eucalyptus Oil and a relieve a cold. Ask for Australia s best —"ROCKE'S." 4

For Children's Hacking Cough at night, Woods' Great Peppermint Cure — Ls 6d. 2s 6d.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OAM19110526.2.14

Bibliographic details

Oamaru Mail, Oamaru Mail, Volume XXXIX, Issue 10776, 26 May 1911

Word Count
1,388

Oamaru Mail Oamaru Mail, Volume XXXIX, Issue 10776, 26 May 1911

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