Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

Daily Circulation, 1474. The Oamaru Mail FRIDAY, APRIL 10, 1885.

There should be a large attendance of the the electors o£ Oamaru at the meeting which has been called for to-night at the Athenseum Hall. The object of that meeting is, if we are not mistaken, to select an elector to become a candidate fox the seat rendered vacant in the House of Representatives through the. retirement of Mr Shrimski. Liberal electors only are invited ; but as all Oamaru electors are Liberals there is no reason why they should not all be present. : If the room should prove to be too small for their accommodation," we assume that ; the meeting could be transferred to a larger room. Much" interest is displayed in the selection of a successor to Mr Shrimski, and naturally so. Mr Shrimski has been a consistent and active supporter of the party at present io. r power-j and as bitter an opponent o£. that party seeks*'-td regain popularity and rule;-" Oamaru's representatives have, ever cin'oe party lines were defined through the conduct of the Continuous Ministry, been on the same side—the side .of the people.. The present is a oritical period in the history of this electorate. A hasty or careless selection might result in representation in Parliament the reverse of - that which would meet with the approval of the great bulk of the electors There should be no doubt whatever as to the political character and qualifications of the man chosen. If Mr Bialop should consent to offer himself, the electors should experience no difficulty in coming to a decision. He, as a tried matt and a man of political experience and sound views, should be accepted with thanks. New Zealand constituencies are seldom affordad such a choics. Men who have important businesses, the success of which, in a'large measure, depends upon their personal supervision and inaustry, are reluctant to absent themselves from those businesses during a large portion of every year, and to accept responsibilities which divert their minds from attention to their own affairs. For this reason the bulk of our representatives have been men either independent of their Own labor, or having no occupation by which to earn a livelihood. The sympathies of the one class are generally in the direction of capitalists, the sympathies of the other are generally with themselves, and/ whilst they, as a rule, have no business capacity, they alto have no conscience. We have had more than enough of capitalists' tools and professional - politicians. Political morality and patriotism, if they exist at all in this colony, are, like other virtues, to be found amongst the middle . classes, imongst that class are. to be found the truly independent men, whose judgv meht and actions are not trammelled by consideration for any special class, but for the people as a whole. It is the duty of the electors to make choice of representatives from thi3 class wherever they are afforded an opportunity of doing so, and to view such a choice as a rare blessing. We have no doubt that, at to-night's meeting,' 1 Mr Hislop will be asked to definitely state whether or not he intends to contest Mr| Shrimski's seat. That he feels it to be his I duty to place himself at the disposal of the electors.is certain. But it would appear that he desires that the invitation to do so should emanate from the assembled electors. Lord Reidhaven is already in the field, and Mr William Hutchison, an old and experienced Parliamentarian in the Liberal interest, the Danedin Star states, intends to woo the electors of this constituency. Lord Reidhaven would doubtless rally round him a large nnmber of those who supported him during the last election, even if Mr Hislop were to oppose him, but he would nevertheless be beaten by a large majqrity; but Mr Hutchison's chance would be of the remotest kind. The electors of Oamaru, will we think, much prefer a local man, though he may be a novice, to an absentee, however expert and accomplished. If Mr Hislop should decide not to enter the contest, Lord Reidhaven, judging from present appearances, would have a walk-over. To-night's meeting will, however, probably throw some light on the subject.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OAM18850410.2.9

Bibliographic details

Daily Circulation, 1474. The Oamaru Mail FRIDAY, APRIL 10, 1885., Oamaru Mail, Volume IX, Issue 2873, 10 April 1885

Word Count
705

Daily Circulation, 1474. The Oamaru Mail FRIDAY, APRIL 10, 1885. Oamaru Mail, Volume IX, Issue 2873, 10 April 1885

Working