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PETONE'S RICH HARVEST

. Collect AH Three In Dominion Fin^l Against Western SOUTHERNERS MORE SPEEDY • JFrom "N.Z. Truth's" Special Wellington Eepresentative.) Petone Soccer players should invest their savings m tickets m Tatts. They are the luckiest lot* that ever walked off a football field.

WITH their forwards held, . their backs out-paced ' and out-manoeuvred by :>■ speedy, solid Western (Christchurch) Club, Petone nevertheless collared the Chatham Cup for the second time m : three starts. They did not deserve the victory. The game was a contrast m styles, arid on a treacherous turf and m bitter cbn- ' ditions, Petone won out, not by their own 1 merit, but because a Western forward lost his head at the moment which was ■ the turning point of the game. 1 . v Man for man the

Western team was superior. Despite the sound defence of Hames, . ably , seconded by the emergency bo.y, Brown, and the remarkable work of Campbell m the second spell when he came through time after tirrfe with the ball, the Western side had Petone pinned. In each spell the Western' grip tightened until the Wellington club men could do little

but wriggle helplessly. It was with' 'the climax of - this assault that the blunder was made which cost Western the game. Petone had held no chance against the Chrfstchurch team at any stage i qf the match. Their backs were abi solutely outpaced by the visitors, and unable to stem their rushes, while their forwards ' were not keyed up enough to bring their concerted work anything. ■ The link between right-winger Baistow and his centre-forward was lamentably weak and Leslie, spoiling for a chance, was being sent to chase the ball when the centre should have been flying to his feet. The only Petone forward who. showed ability to beat his man was Craig, the left-wing, and his side's early lead came from a deceptive swerve and * shot "by Craig after he had run round E. Colville. The shot was actually stopped by the Christchurch 'keeper, but. the force of the wind caused him to reel back into the- goal; ' ' In each spell it was Western" who made the ; pace- and only remarkably fine defensive work by the Wellington side kept i ' -

them out. Petone's careful, slower game was left standing by the dash and precision of . the Christchurch attack. ' The halves and forwards were too' nippy and too schooled m combined work for the Petone eleven. „ „. There was no doubt that Western were lasting better and when they- scored their equalising goal it looked as if they must certainly win. With extra time looming as a possibility, it still looked as if they must take the trophy south again. Then came the incident which .set the large crowd hooting wildly and led to a hostile demonstration when the Petone men walked up to take the trophy. There was an electric break through by the southern forwards, Falloon, Ellis and MacMillan ail being on hand. McVean, the

Petone skippergoalie, diverted a shot . which rebounded into the goal area and he dashed oiit after it and slipped on the turf. . There is no doubt that m the second before Falloon sent the leather into the net m a way which almost burst the rigging, McVean was played by an opponent. There is also no doubt that m the melee many

things were happening. Referee Cazetey\saw his duty to the goalie first and awarded a free-kick to Petone to the consternation of the proWestern crowd which expected at least a penalty. And, thrown off their balance by seeing that they were not a point ahead, Western weakly allowed. Dodds to ' redeem a weak game by .going through to score. This dramatic reversal of the position was not diminished, by the fact that almost at once the whistle went, leaving the Petone men the victors. • Hoots, gibes and- ironical cheers, resounded as the villagers trooped to where Sir Charles Statham stood waiting *to hand over the Cup.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZTR19300911.2.86.7

Bibliographic details

PETONE'S RICH HARVEST, NZ Truth, Issue 1292, 11 September 1930

Word Count
659

PETONE'S RICH HARVEST NZ Truth, Issue 1292, 11 September 1930

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