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The Parable of The Sower

IN humanity we may find striking parallels with Biblical characters, their, disappointments, their hopes, their beliefs, their failures.

The chronicles of the things to which they applied the instrument of endeavor during the ephemeral span they called three score years and ten, may find many a reflection m the present day mirrors of what we have come to know as LIFE

THEIR messages lie deeply m the monoliths and catacombs. OURS skim lightly o'er the mottled surface of the printed page, and unless they are alive with the genius of a Shakespeare or a Jowett, will have lost their significance .ere a decade has been rubbed from the surface of Time.

Still, it is well that we should change our opinions, provided the fluctuation is not too violent, since the tenets of today may be hopelessly Inadequate for to-morrow.

So, thehi we turn to a modern sower of religious thought. The Right Reverend Thomas Henry Sprott, Bishop of Wellington, is a profound divine who for years has tried to fathom the deeps of modern reasoning, the reasoning, if it may be called that, which prompts latter-day peoples to sit complacently m what His Lordship, describes as "The ma-

chine of pleasure," instead of filling pews at divine service. The Bishop, like many another clergyman, has sought vainly to ascribe the cause. Indeed; he admitted at the Anglican Synod last week that cause and effect * seemed at once synonymous and yet different; that it was difficult to determine whether the people had constructed the vehicle of pleasure, or whether the apparatus had carried them impotently along to their present convictions.

For many, many years the courtly figure of this earnest gentleman has been familiar to New Zealanders — since 1887, as a matter of fact — and throughout that period his labors have been marked by deep religious devotion and an unflagging sense of duty to his church; attributes which ( have merited and achieved unqualified respect from both laity and clergy.

Like the Biblical sower, the Bishop has sown on , fruitful soil, where it flourished, and on stony ground, which has not fructified. Whether the' soil liked not the seed with which it was fed, or whether the machine of pleasure crushed it, is a matter which the sower must decide.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZTR19290711.2.32.7

Bibliographic details

The Parable of The Sower, NZ Truth, Issue 1232, 11 July 1929

Word Count
383

The Parable of The Sower NZ Truth, Issue 1232, 11 July 1929

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