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ARTHUR FAIR, K.C.

"Indian Chief" to Solicitor-General

JUST twentyeight to. thirty years ago . a group .of dusty, grubby* barefooted youngsters," under the louder ship of another youngster equally favored by m o th e r earth, crept with exaggerated caution aroun:l the base of a huge mullock heap, and m and about the deserted engine house that was huddled at the feet of the gaunt poppet legs of a Charleston gold mine. With a sudden rush, accompanied by wild, bloodcurdling yells : Hawk Eye, the great Indian chief, led his band of Shrieking warriors on the war path through the abandoned claims of the old gold field long since worked out. Had,you been there those many years ago, you would thus have encountered Hawk Eye, son of James William Fair (a Charleston draper) and christened by his parents Arthur. With His fairtowseled hair and its liberal crop of feathers (as befitted the dignity of his rank) and with eyes blue as the heaven's, he played at the greatest of all boyish games. Red Indians. A lew years later

you would have found him vested with a greater dignity, that of early youth, and making his first entry at the big Nelson Educational School. Here with the same zest that he had entered into the game of Red Indians and bushrangers m his childhood days, he tackled the problems of education and athletics. • . : However much his you'hg mind may have run along the lines of battle," and murder, and sudden death, still "a boy's will is the wind's -will" .... [and Arthur Fair found his thoughts turning towards af ield m direct opposition to his childhood ambitions. The study of law. appealed to him! Then he grew up, but as he grew into manhood he delved further and further into the profession he had chosen m life, until m the year 1905 he was found m the office of Messrs. Skerrett and Wylie, of Wellington, still buried m the musty, dry, but to him fascinating study of law. In 1907 he Avas admitted as a barrister and solicitor, and remained with the firm of Skerrett and Wylie until the beginning of 1914. He v/ent home to England on a pleasure trip, and when all the fuss started m France remained to take a hand m it. " . 4 In a Suffolk Regiment the blue-eyed Hawk Eye of ■• Charleston days became transformed into a captain of His Majesty's forces, and he j>ut the same amount of energy into chasing the Turk m Palestine under General AUenby. When the big. dust-up had subsided, like everybody else that remained alive to do so, hje came home, home of course being New Zealand. The Crown LaAV office claimed him m 1921, when' he' was appointed Crown Solicitor. Thus his habit of delving into dusty records of law -brought its punishment. . . In May of this year, the Crown gave him the job of Solicitor-General with the additional honor of K.C. to assist him m attending to the interests of the State. His faculty for digging: into law manifested itself m two volumes of evidence (each of 150 pages) for which he was mainly responsible m the now notable Flour Millers . Case (Distributors, Ltd.). ■■■-.' He will not admit it but his most vicious trait is a keen interest m anything that necessitates any delving into the musty documents of the past.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZTR19251224.2.21

Bibliographic details

ARTHUR FAIR, K.C., NZ Truth, Issue 1048, 24 December 1925

Word Count
561

ARTHUR FAIR, K.C. NZ Truth, Issue 1048, 24 December 1925

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