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Double Tragedy by Lonely Lake

• — -. *♦ ~ Man arid Girl Shot

A Warrant for Abduction Pursued the Male

But ; ; Death Arrived First, by the Waters of Rotoma

(From "Truth's" Rotorua; Rep.) . Another 'motor ride by : a man rand a girl to the ; edge : of a lonely water has ended m fatal tragedy. A week or two ago it happened m the South Island; this week m the North. • A Public-Works roadman at Rotomasaw a - man and a, girl pass m a < motor-car. Later he heard shots from the edge of the ; lake. .. Investigating, he found the <man and. the girl both lying shot dead. He states that the first shot was followed by a scream. The police- declare that" the' girl' could not have shot 1 herself.. These statements, put together,- suggest; that she was shot by. the man, who afterwards shot himself. • . ; -, . The man was Carl Oise,n, a Swede or Dane r aged 38; the girl was , M-olly Moors, aged 14. Both lived at Horotiu, not far from Hamilton. There was some . attachment between them, and. m, order to break it, , the girl's parents sent her to an aunt m Hastings, Hawkes Bay. It is alleged that Ol'sen motored .from Hamilton to Hastings, and took the . girl back with him, without Her aunt's consent. . i En *route back towards the Waikato, they stopped, at a Bay oF r\lenty hotel, where Olsen engaged separate bedrooms. A warrant for his arrest was pursuing .them, when they left that hotel for Rotor.ua, via' Rotoma. Before the warrant could reach its destination, death overtook .them at the lake-side. It ' is stated that a medical examination, reveals no sexual interference with the girl. Whether Olsen knew of the warrant, is not clear, but it is stated that he dreaded punishment for manslaughter m connection with an accident about a month ago. to a motor car driven by*' him — : an' accident resulting m the death pf Mr. and Mrs. Graham (passengers) and $h'e>,', serious injury of their daughter. , '• :;- ; " V&< v ' The shooting was done permediunr of a ;sawn -off shot-gun. The Rotoma tragedy is -unlike the Wharekuri ; mystery m .that neitner, man nor. gun is.missing. „ ' > .

• ' Naturally a .profound sensation was ' caused on its' becoming known that the -bodies of . a man and a young girl— the former with his, head shatter-ed,-the latter shot, through the hearthad, been f ound -■• lying m the sand • at the edge of Rotoma. Across the body of, the man- was lying a- single-barrel shot-gun; : with the barrel sawn off almost flush iwith .the stock, making it almost murderous-looking weapon. Nearby' was a deserted two-seater Dodge car, bearing' the' number 20-602; | There were' tracks through the stubble j arid sand, showing where the, car had suddenly, swerved m from the road for about 150 yards to 'a- spot' along the foreshore, hidden from the view of passing: -traffic, and two wheels of the I car were actuary resting m the water of •■-.the lake. Both bodies were fully clothed, andwearing overcoats.. '. There .was nothing m the. personal belongings of either to indicate identity, apart from a telegraphic dispatch form m» the girl's handbag, which was addressed: "Moors, ] Box 12, Horotiu;" but. there was no accompanying message. \ For a full day the police were unable toY establish the identity of the victims. .Even ..the number of the car did not furnisn them with a. ready clue, as itwa's found that while the car had been registered at Hamilton, it had since been transferred, and the transfer had not' been registered. '■■ G I R L ON L V FO URTE EN . The victims were, . however, finally identified as Carl Olsen, aged 38, and Molly Moors, aged 14. No living sou| witnessed the trag- U edy, although the two-shots whiqh .. accounted for the lives of the victims were : . heard by a Public Works' roadman named Relph, who was wbrkihg close by. ' A possible supposition from the details above was that the girl had been abducted and outraged, and then shot by the man, but while there may be some circumstances ' leading to : the abduction theory, it is quite certain that the girl had never -been interfered with prior to the moment when she; met her death under such tragic circumstances. . This is proved. by a. medical .examination of the girl carried out on police instructions. > Olsen, who was well-known m the Waikato, was. a tallish, fair man, with blue eyes :and a ruddy face. He was a. well.. set up fellow who wore a pince nez and spoke with a slightly ;broken accent. He was believed to be either a Swede or a Dane.- y/He was a single man and for the past three years had been m partnership with a man named Rust m a general store business at Horotiu Village, situated about seven miles from Hamilton on the Ngaruawahia/Main Road. i The: Moors were z*elatives of Rust, Molly Moors being Rust's niece. Behind the store, are living quarters which were ■ occupied -by the Moors family— father, mother, Molly, and her young brother.' ' A, CHARMING MAID, AND POPULAR. . Mr;? Moors was engaged as accountant at the store,' and/ both Olsen and Rust, being single men, boarded with the Moors family. : : Molly Moors' was a very becoming girl,' big for her E: age,, but it was not so much' her looks as her charming manner that endeared her. to the neighborhood. She was, m fact, quite, a; favorite, and it /is : understood : that' Olsen also fell a victim to her charms. It is, m; fact, stated that' the girl and Olsen became yery much attached to each other, and that it was ..owing to : this fact- that Mrs. Moors sent her daughter to ■Hastings, Hawkes Bay, to ■ stay with ,an aunt for a; time,', hoping to break pff the attachment. Last Thursday Olsen journeyed 1 into HamiKon, wh,ere, after pur/.phasing • a Xtwo-seater ' - car, he called jon a .firm of solicitors and ; v : asked 'them to draw up his will. '■■" He left' them details, and iritim'ated "that-he- was anxious to have the documentv prepared with expedi- ;■ tioh.' i^. ..' . ' ... . .-..• '.. He was asked to' call on Friday morning, t but; failed ;to do so. . : biSAppEARANCE FROM HASTINGS ' He-Jeft'the.distript, presumably, '/for Rptorua,, on Friday, but apparently drove straight thrpugh tP Hastings, •fp'r ph Saturday; night the girl disappeared frpiiril the hpmepf her auntj withput giving, any, indication of her intentipn. ; Her aunt immediately com'iri'unicated., with : Mr s. , , Moors, who informed .the .police and. laid a. charge of : abduction against Olsen, for whose "arrest, it is. stated,', a warrant was \issued.' y~ ':' y. : ''.'\-~. > . . ' .-• ■•'• , : ''Where.,,' the couple' spent . Saturdaynight 'has. not. been ' ascertained, but it is ' known that they arrived at the ;Whakatane ; . Hotel, on S.Uhday night, where tlie -man' , engaged two ! single roprnsiat Te'Teko'. Hotel. Both were wearing, overcoats,: and ' the licensee, thinkihg that thejr /.might be- man . and •wife, i.intimated that there was a double ;rbom /available, .but the ' 'man' said that •nis 'desire,' ,was f br7 t^vo ; single: rooms. T)}e couple j bopked m as 'Mr . :. and : Miss :ciark: ■:•■■■■■■ ; /.:,/r- : ; . ; ■.■■•■,-;■■ >■ ■■■;••■•. ■ ■ • eRIGH^ START >ON 'FATAL DAY. v ' The .- following, .morning, Monday, after : breakfast, they -left by the Roto - I'ua'Rba'dvand were apparently 'm high spirits. -They spoke quite cheerfully to; the landlord of the wonders of the trip; 'and/, there , was. nothing' ■ about them? to presage^ the terrible fate that awaited them that:' morning.' ' Liittle aid 'the girl, ,at any ratei\' dream, as she sniile'd good-b>fe to the waitress as the , car drove away, that -within -two hours ,sh« j. would,/ be lying a" corpse near : a . lonely : lalce beside the ; dead body, -of 'her- ■companion; ;■./•. .'- •. " : Their , movements - can ; be ', traced .to the very .edge ': of ithe. lake where the \ grim 'tragedy; was enacted, for a short .'.time ; before - the - shots .■■signalled*: the

passing of .two souls, the car got into • Qifflculties on the road, and a Public Works' man, Mr. Relph, assisted ''to put the car to rights. For his trouble he was given half a crown by Olsen. A short distance further along/the car swerved off to the lake as described, j BCREAM.FOLL.OWEp FIRST SHOT.! When Relph \ heard the first shot ring out on the still morning auv-he also heard', a scream, but as he was accustomed., to .hearing shooting parties m the vicinity during the preceding few days, he considered the scream to be merely the, death i' call of some stricken bird, and gave it no further thought. ...... A few seconds, elapsed, and there , was another shotj then, except for t the whirr of birds m flight-silence ■ fe!l - ■•" ": , ■ • ■ •''. '■ ■■• For some reason which he cannot explain, " Relph felt uneasy, and was drawn to the spot, where a terrible [sight met his horrified gaze. "' : Lying on the sand, with feet close to the' Water's,. edge,' were the warm dead bodies of the couple 'he had assisted - but a time before. The sight was a ghastly one to behold. The lower part of thie> whole of one side of the man's face was shattered; his. tongue was lying on the ground beside him. Across his chest was the shortened shot 'gun, apparently cut down to fit the tool box of the car. ■'■' The girl's \deadii body was' alongside him. with the left breast and heart shattered. / • , Ai .'■..'■'_;■•• The ; parents of the girl were stunned with "■ shock .when information of. the tragedy was conveyed, to them, and Mr.. Moors immediately left fpr Rotorua to vie:yy the bodies; 'hoping against j hope", that- some terrible mistake had | been made. ' j RUMOR CONTRADICTED. | Once news of the tragedy spread abroad, all sorts of. wild rumors began tp v circulate. One which gained currency was that ReiphVtOh hearing the first shot; hurried to the scene m time to see the man lying dead, and the girl standing with the; shot gun to her breast; and that before he could intervene she pulled the trigger and fell dead. . This is quite incorrect. Relph denies the :; story; and ■ the police state that it is impossible for the girl to have shot herself, as it was a physical. impossibility for her to have reached the trigger m the ppsitipn m which the gun must have been held to inflict such a wound, the shot entering beneath her left arm. : : Olsen a little over a month ago was the driver of a car which crashed on the Horotiu road, with fatal consequences to two of its passengers. Mr. and Mrs. Graham, of Horotiu, and withj serious injury, to" their daughter! Daphne, who still lies m a serious condition m the Waikato Hospital. . j The suggestion is that at the- time of the accident Olsen was' the worse for liquor, and the pending inquest seemed to' have weighed on his mind a good deal, for he 'was known to have j communicated his v dread: of the consequences to friends, i whom he told that he expected td> get twenty years' imprisonment for manslaughter. WHAT HAPPENED ON SATURDAY? When Mr. and Mrs. Moors sent their daughter from Horotiu to Hastings, she went via Frarikton Junction, and it is said that, on the. station platform, she had' a talk with Olsen. . At /Hastings she stayed with Mr. and ; Mrs. C^.H. Thompson, Mrs. Thompson being her aunt, but she left their residence last Saturday. . . it is stated that, before she left' Thompson's on Saturday morning, Mr. Thompson knew that she had' an appointment (arranged by letter) with someone; thaf morning m Hastings, but/that he attached no special importance to it. But when she. did, not .return he informed jthe police, adding that the girl had'been sent down to stay with her aunt m., order, to . keep her . out of Olsen's. : way. How she ; came to be persuaded to leave -Hastings with Olseri. is not known. "~ ■ . ,■ ''':. Olsen's body, was r< found* alongside the girl's. The gun' was m his hands. "Everything seems to ■;" b ; e' consistent with: the idea ■ that i\he shot the girl, then' himself. ,'■■ '. . . ;: ;. One discharged shell was>stiir m the, gun, another was floating, in the lake. The; gun, as cut: down, was. 16 inches long, 10 inches of this being barrel.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZTR19250509.2.22

Bibliographic details

Double Tragedy by Lonely Lake, NZ Truth, Issue 1015, 9 May 1925

Word Count
2,012

Double Tragedy by Lonely Lake NZ Truth, Issue 1015, 9 May 1925

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