Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

ATHLETICS AND CYCLING

A Historic Meeting

RECORDS AND STANDARDS

SHATTERED.

(By "Starter.")

TALENT UNEXCELLED

To say that the 1925 championships which were run off at Wanganui last week were the greatest that anyone m this country has ever had the. privilege of witnessing is not drawing the long bow for never before has such a representative array of talent — real talent — stepped on to a sports field m New Zealand. ROSE THE HEART-BREAKER. There were so many brilliant performances that one scarcely knows where to begin comment on them, but pride of place must go to the recordbreaking, and for those who grimly pursued him, heart-breaking effort of R. A. Rose m the three ( miles. Lap after lap he went at an unrelenting and punishing pace and when he had passed the tape the N.Z. three miles record of twenty-four years' standing had gone by the board. Rose's time was 14min 45 l-ssec, bettering W. F. Simpson's 14min 49secs established away back m 1901. Little George Hyde, the diminutive Australian, hung tenaciously to Rose's flank for a great part of the race but the punishing pace tcld on him and he gradually slipped back and was a fair distance behind at the finish, but his was a great effort and his time 15min 3sec is 6secs inside standard time. HARRY KERR'S COME-BACK. Another feature of the meeting vas the come-back of Harry Kerr, the veteran walker. He is now on the wrong side of forty but he is still a determined walker and beat Mclntosh, the present N.Z. champion pointless m bcth the mile and three mile events. PARKER'S HUNDRED. A classic field stepped on to the mark for the hundred final : Parker (Australia), Leadbetter (Wellington), Jenkins (Wellington), Brownlie (Canterbury), Paris (Wellington), Morgan (Otago). A y great start sent the men away and at eighty yards Leadbetter was shading the Australian but the latter came with a wonderful burst and won by inches. C. H. Jenkins was far below his last year's championship form and was just beaten for third place by D. Paris. The time, was 10 seconds, wonderful time for a -lead track and the race is the best we have seen since the historic Can* — Kirksey battle. A GREAT QUARTER RUNNER. W. Kyle ran a pretty race m the 440 and he looked a winner right from the pistol. L. A. Tracy challenged m the straight but Kyle responded and drew away again to win by four yards. Kyle is a slim, attractive runner who shows such capabilities that to break SOsecs should not be beyond him. The time for this race was 51secs, bettering the standard by lsec. A GRIM HALF-MILE. Campbell's forcing tactics made a grim race of the half-mile. He struck out m front and was never headed. Laing, an exceedingly promising runner from Canterbury, stuck to him gamely but could make no impression. "Tickle" Whyte, the Australian, came Avith a line burst at the death and beat Laing for second place, but he left his run too late to seriously threaten the winner. The time was excellent, 1.58 3-5, l-ssec inside standard, time. A DUBIOUS 220. The 220 was run on an awkward bend which was all against fast timos. When the field entered the straight it was seen that Tracy had an advantage, but Morgan (Otago) and Paris (Wellington) put m an effort and were rapidly closing the gap. The runners flashed past the tape and the judges awarded Morgan and Tracy a deadheat for first with Paris, third. I was right on the finishing line and it appeared to me that Tracy just got there, although fast dying. I could not separate Morgan and Paris for seconds The former, by the way, is a young runner who has all the attributes of a champion. He ran a fine race indeed. The comparatively slow time of 23 1-5 is accounted for by the damp track and sharp bends. Grehan (Australia) won his heat on the first day but m doing so unfortunately hurt an ankle and could not compete m the final. BURN ESS SHOWS HIS QUALITY. Despite his failures on the grass tracks I have always been convinced that Cecil Burness could produce *he goods when he got a chance of riding under conditions that he was accustomed to. On the Wanganui raised hard track he came to light with a vengeance and> Avon five out of six events, championships and handicaps. He rode Avith confidence and judgment and it Avill take a very good cyclist indeed to head him off on a hard track. NOTED CYCLISTS FAIL. Some of the other cyclists from whom I expected great things did not shOAV up at all. Forrester, the Canterbury crack, rode Avell but he lackedt dash at the finish and showed signs of having trained off. Cyril Flett, .the Wellington champion, was never comfortable on the track and was under a disadvantage m this respect. A boy who provided the surprise of the meeting Avas Gray of Wanganui. Apparently he knows hls^ home-tOAvn track from A to Z and makes the most of it. He dropped from the clouds m the three miles championship and just touched off Burness for first place. A THRILLING MILE. Rose Avon the mile but he by no means had it all his 'own Avay. Hyde and Whyte (Australia) ran easily most of the Avay and over the last 100 yards the former came aAvay with a startling burst. He raced up to Rose and actually headed him, but Hyde had timed his run a fraction too soon and he began" to die just before the tape and Rose forged ahead again and got home. Whyte was a good third' and all three men finished inside standard time. Dufresne, ex-champion, and Priestley, N.Z. 'Varsity champion, also started m this event but shoAved disappointing form and never looked like Avinning, Dufresne stitched up m this and also m the three mile event. A season off the .track is probably Avhat he requires to bring back his freshness. GOOD HURDLING. The time of 15 4-ssecs m the hurdles is the best we haA r e had since Harry Wilson reth'ed. Victory went to Lander, the present champion. He hurdled Avith confidence and finished about two yards ahead of that good allrounder Dunbar. Williams, a vastlyimproved and promising boy from Wairarapa, was third. In the 440 event Loav, of Canterbury, the present champion, found his nerves higher than the hurdles and Avas beaten by Nesdale after a A^ery patchy race. Lander Avas third. The time of 59secs Avas 2 1-5 seconds faster than the event Avas.Avon m last year. '•■'•" FINE JUMPS. Wilton (Wellington) was the most successful jumper, winning both the broad jump and the hop, step. In the former .he did 21ft 4%in. Shirley (Auckland) with 21ft 6 %in Avas second and Low (Canterbury) 21ft 3in third. Wilton covered 44ft 7in m the hop, step and jump, beating standard distance by 7 inches. Shirley (Auckland) got a standard by jumping 44ft and %m for second place. Norris (West Coast) was .third with 43ft i%in. In the high jump R. Stevens (Canterbury) cleared sft 9in and got first place, Whyte (Otago) second Avith sft 7m, while Shirley (Auckland) and

Roberts (Wellington) divided third place honors Avith sft 6in each. FINE FIELD EVENTS. Standards went toppling m all directions Avhen the field events came on. That popular veteran, Sergeant McHolm of Canterbury, successfully defended his hammer-throAving title, throwing the hammer (Avhich isn't a hammer) 135 ft 3%in to Harvey's (Wellington) 129 ft lOin. Peter Munro (Wellington) lightheartedly tossed the discus for a mere 125 ft 11% in and try as they Avould McHolm (Canterbury) and Hunt (West Coast) could not get Avithin 10ft of it. Peter also put the shot 42ft 9in, Loav (Canterbury) being second Avith 37ft lOin and Hunt 36ft 4in third. To make a day of it Munro also cleaned up the javelin championship with a 155 ft lin throAV, Morgan (Wellington) and Dunbar (Wellington) running him close with 152 ft and 151 ft respectively. ,

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZTR19250307.2.70

Bibliographic details

ATHLETICS AND CYCLING, NZ Truth, Issue 1006, 7 March 1925

Word Count
1,347

ATHLETICS AND CYCLING NZ Truth, Issue 1006, 7 March 1925

Working