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THE LADIES' CHAIN Facts and Fiction for Femininity

(BY MARY B. CONTRARY)

Hastings, which vies with Napier for the honor of being the capital of Hawke's Bay, was m a hubbub of ex- . citement lately over a projected union between a very wealthy widow and a well-to-do widower. Just when everybody was renovating their old frocks— they cannot buy new ones m Hawke's Bay these times — it was suddenly announced that the whole affair was off, and intense was the disappointment, of Mrs. Romney-Marsh, Mrs. Border Lincoln, Mrs. Alderncy and their daughters. At an afternoon tea on The Terrace this week the 'conversation drifted to politics, and "Mrs Talavera" was declaiming against the Massey Government for importing so much coal at £6. per ton, when -a mine which "Mr. Talavera" was interested m could supply the iwhole of "En Zed" at £2 per ton. "Big Bill" and his minions came m for a bad time, as Mrs. j.'. pointed out that the cost ran into millions. "The railways are not paying,'' ciuoth she; "of course they're not, when the Government is losing freight daily from the mines." Then the loss of income tax was referred to .which showed that our women are now beginning to take an intelligent interest m matters political. "Mary" sat back and smiled through it all for she remembered that Mrs. T. and all the family had voted Reform for ages past, and they will probably do so' again. Where are our women police? Dike their brother » Johnops the Sallyups never seem to be m the right place at the right time. Last week two "nymphs of the pave" were carrying on. in a most disgusting manner m the Oriental Bay, reserve, to the great annoyance of women and children- These dames arrived per taxi with a supply of beer, which they proceeded to drink m company with the driver, and between drinks they made coarse remarks to passers-by. Complaints have also been made of similar carryings--on further round the bay. A regular visit from one of the patrols or a mounted man would be welcomed by the residents. "Mary" does not, as a rule, frequent prize fights, but when motoring back from Wanganui last Saturday she was a delighted eye-witness of a really good "set to." It happened this way: ■.A motor hog from Woodville insisted on making himself a pig to all other motorists by waving them to come up and pass him, but .when they were almost abreast he would accelerate his "super six" just to shony its pace, and, of course, with never. a thought of the dust he was raising for the following cars. A Wellington racehorse owner who, by tho way, had won the big race the same day and should have been at peace with the world, withstood the trouble from Wangaehu to Bulls, but by clever tactics he then got the lead approaching the Rangitikei Bridge, and once on, it, he pulled up and immediately proceeded to deal out summary justice to the road hog. The latter would not fight but,\like all curs, he howled for mercy. The iWelling--tonian gave him one, two, three and then pushed on. The Woodville person is not likely, to repeat these tactics on the road. a' r: , ss '" Fashionable weddings are all the rage just now. Last week Miss Grace Guthrie, daughter of the Minister of Railways, was married to Mr. Allan Evans, of Dannevirke. On Thursday, Sir Geo. Hunter, the hlustiing bachelor M.P., was quietly married to Mrs. Edith Munro, of Wellington, arid shortly Miss Isabel, the youngest daughter of the Right Honorable- W. 'P. Massey, is to be married to Mr. C. W. Salmon, of Wellington.. : ;"• at ■ .■:':-- sr ' In these days Of free love and goose-and-gander alliances it is refreshing to find a man who m the hour of triumph' finds time to remember his life's partner. "M.8.C." struck one, metaphorically speaking, of course, at Wanganui last .week; Dad had owned a winner at the races and -when he chased he'adlong J down the stand steps everybody thought he was indent dn leading m the successful prad.- Not on your' little tin -type! He was looking for the missus and when he- ran her to earth on tho lawn he smacked two hearty kisses on her glowing cheeks. "Just married" sneers, the blase hyper-critic. Don't you believe it; they've got married children. Some of these butterfly flappers who pose as alleged nurses m our hospitals find trouble -when they are least looking for it. Recently at a country institution of some size one of them was so atrociously careful that she managed to spill a bottle of • ether over a patient, and the unfortunate victim was badly burnt as a result. Naturally, her husband hit the roof with emphasis and threatened the Board administering the hospital with an action for damages. The Board promptly compromised with a payment of £350 as compensation, not without considr erable haggling, of course. No doubt j the medical superintendent had a few j words to say to his staff anent the ] occurrence, but that iwon't prevent its ! recurrence if more care is not taiken j m the selection of junior nurses, i Carelessness of that kind is unforgiv- | able. "M.B.C- " is not one of those ! cheery optimists, who regard all [ nurses as nothing less than angels. In her time she has seen quite a number ! of hard-faced, flat-chested shemales I who have adopted the nursing profes- j sion as the least line of resistance to- I wards the matrimonial goal. As a re- i suit women patients secure ' the least | possible attention commensurate with safety and the men are coddled and petted like so many toy terriers. it t : :* Recently at St. Peter's Church, Wellington, a marriage of considerable, social interest (all the more so as it had hot been previously announced to the i numerous friends of the contracting j parties) was . celebrated; Sir George Hunter, M.P., the well-known repre- ! sentative for'Waipawa, being united to , Mrs. E. Munro, of Wellington' Terrace. ' formerly of Otane. Hawke's Bay- The marriage was quite private, only the ' immediate relatives of the parties be- '■ ing invited. After the ceremony. Sir , George" and his bride left' for Paranga- ! hau, where the honeymoo- is to be j spent. , Sir George and his "wife are j both natives of Wellington and inti- : mately connected with the early set- ; tiers. Both as a politician and as a ■ sportsman Sir George is well-known, ■■ and is deservedly popular. During the war, as is well-known, he distinguished ' himself by the "'munificence of his gifts '. of 'land'.and cash for the benefit of returned soldiers. He is to be congratu- > lated on his entry to tho Holy state, as m this important matter a politi- : . clan., should 'always set a good example of his constituents. .

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZTR19220304.2.9

Bibliographic details

THE LADIES' CHAIN Facts and Fiction for Femininity, NZ Truth, Issue 850, 4 March 1922

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1,138

THE LADIES' CHAIN Facts and Fiction for Femininity NZ Truth, Issue 850, 4 March 1922

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