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PERSONS, PLEBS & PLUTES

Fred Mace, a pioneer of the KingCountry, who died a few days ago, was the discoverer of, the Waitomp CaA'es. He had»,an adventurous career and m his early days followed a seafaring life, being . the first master of a clipper sailing. to China. When he came out to New; Zealand he followed mostly surveying work, and was kept very busy m this line during . the mining boom m 1868. Deceased is survived by two brothers, Alfred Mace of Pahiatua, and Edward Mace, of Wellington.

Another oid'ehap with an adventurous career and,, who passed out recently was William T. Collerton. Deceased came out to Australia when a child, and on reaching manhood's estate he join,ed the Australian police as a trooper, participating m the pursuit of th& Keljy Gang. He came on to New Zealand m 1879, joining the N. 2. Police Force, and served m this connection for 35 years. He was the capturer of Andrew Sommerville, the Masterton -murderer, and was also prominent m many other exciting adventures associated with his calling. «S !t ».!

For the past : eleven years ehiftf clerk of the Lands Survey Department, Mr, Leckie, has passed away at Rotorua at the age of 61 years. At the age of 25, the late Mr. Leckie joined the staff of the Public Works "Department and was afterwards private, secretary to .several Prime Ministers of . N.e>y Zealand. Mr. Lockie Avas appointed to a responsible, position m the* Land "and- Survey Department, , Auckland,, and held "it till he was • tran^fttrred to Christchurch elev — en., years ago. ; v Phe late Mr. 'Leckie •.was thrmifirtioiit his life a very rtctive and e-nergetic man,, and was keenly interested m all branches of sport. . While 1 , in /Wellington,- he was. a iriember of the Wellington^ Cricket Club, and was also a representative .foot-, bailer. In ChrlstchUrch he was a member of the North, Beach Tennis Club,- ■arid also a very active member of the Surf Bathing; Club. '. About three ■weelcs ago - Mr.. Leckie's he<n.lth broke down, arid: it was thought that a trip to Rotorua would be the means of his ■■■recuperating,, but the -trip was to no avail; ' He leaves a widow and four children. : ■ ,' .

Trade union secretaries do. not usually make a good fist of ihings at Conciliation Council or Arbitration Court proceedings and m the matter.. of legal adroitness are often beaten' back by the heavier guns that plute can afford to buy to bear on their opponents' defences. -.; However, a sound and sensible .judge' like 'y Mr. Justice Fraser can weigh the merits of a case *■ fairly well without : being. ':. overawed by V heavy phraseology, .'legal* adroitness '; or verbal dexterity. But- Tom Blb'otlworth put forward mlhmvn onto argument ait ro« can I. Arbitration; Court preoeeding-e at

Auckland during the hearing of 'the hairdressers', dispute. As an argument for the closing of hairdressers' shops on Saturday afternoon, he. suggested that as part of the barbers' trade -was his ability to , tell his customers all the latest sporting gossip, the saloons should be closed on the Saturday.afternoon so that those engaged m the hairshearihg business could attend the sports and gather tit-bits of news for their custom ersr The learned judge was impressed, but "Truth" would suggest that instead of closing the shops on Saturday the mouths of the ton-' sonial artists should be closed" seven days m the week, allowing peace and rest for their over- talked-at -customers.

J. C. Cusack, the well known Wellington hair-dresser and tobacconist, has, m his spare time, always interested 'himself m sport, and m ' the night : time, to keep himself busy, as It were, has for many years past put m useful work at ocoa'siohal fires. In fact, J.C.C. Is one of those fellows who must always be busy, he fairly bristles "> with energy even to the tips of his perfectly .pointed pei*ky little moustache.' 111-health lias unfortunately put a dajnper on his superabundant, energy and he has had to relinquish his Job as secretary of the Wellington Volunteer Fire Police- In appreciation of his past services the ■members of the plain clothes fire cops : gathered together ■ tho 'other evoriing and made, him o. presonta'tion. It will, howwfv, tako a, very .serious illness to damn the -ardour oi' J.C.C.

An interesting fellow, who will 'shortly blow into Wellington, a'cconipahicd . by s6*v T (>i'al setils nnd yuiuk-y '■.'•'mßrrnaids," is Captain Adams.- The captain is putting- on for the'. Fuller circuit m New Zealand one of the biggest turns that Ben- John -Walter' have ever imported .. to these , parts. What > Cap'hi Adams doesn't know about seals is known only to old Neptune or Davy Jones. Thirty- five years ago the Ga'p'iv wag at the Royal Aciuarinm m ."London .haying- -chargo of anything m (ho place" .that*. happened, to have a fin on it. While m that position lie directed an expedition to the North Sea m tho search for seals, and managed- to land • twenty-seven ofthem. From this little colony of seals Ackms gathered most oi' /.his.'.••know,-"-ledge as to their habits and . their want?.. For . instance, ';• he discovered. that he could teach.., the seals a- dozen^ "dry" tricks to one "wet" trick, mean -"" .ing that the seals were more intelligent out of the. water than m it: , He was"- the first person to see m Mr. S.eal the ••possibilities of a performinganimal. "There, is nothing so-Jijtelli-;': gent as the seal," said Captain /Adahis to a "Truth", rop. "A dog >vill forget tho tricks you teach him,, but not so the sba-Hon. Tlio. malb .sea-lipi-i Is, Itdwevoi 1 . -'mni'Q Intetllfi'eht* ■•■than tho i lady animal." .;• : ;- : : ' V, . , . :.;.,.

Four years off the century mark, James Harcourt Green, an old identity of , Palmerston North, quit this world of trouble a few days ago. The old fellow was 'born m Colchester, England, and came out to settle m Palmerston North half a century back. During'! his life he proved Mmself als honest as the sun and was liked and admired by all.! Old age brought infirmity, and old Jamie found himself m the Old People's Home, whei-e,. in.stead of being 1 a crotchetty old chap, bemoaning the ills of years, he always wore a smiling face and was .the faforite at that institution.

■ Once more they have resiirrectefl poor old Czar Nicholas. The late Czar had an anxious enough time when he was alive, but his shade must- be having a similarly anxious time making up his mind, as to whether he is a dinkum shade or only a rumor. The latest .story 'that, the Czar is alive come from an Italian Count who \ has returned to his native land after being, imprisoned fo three years m Si-' beria. He affirms that the Czar and his t Missus- are still alive and have taken refuge m Japan where they are 'living: ■under- the. 'protection of the Mikado. This is- about the umpty-twoth time the Czar has been hurried back from the grave. Nickie's revival has been -invariably followed by another account of how he met his death, so that any day now we may erpect from our voracious and veracious "daylies" an entirely new account as to how thfl. Czar was' murdered by the revolutionaries.

■An old journalist and well-known citizen of Temuka, Jeremiah M. Twomey, .(lied at .his residence at the age of 74 years. The late Mr. Twomey was well-known: as a. journalist throughout New Zealand, and during- -his career was employed on the • Wellington '"Tribune", nnd "Chronicle," the "'Evening Post," the Wanganui "Herald," and the Christchurch "Press." Mr. Twomey was born m■. Kferry, Ireland, and landod m Maoriland m tho year 1874. I J e was employed on various, nft-ws-p:ipers till 1881,. when he purchased the ■■'Temuka Leader." Through his energy and ability this paper thrived and becfime, .the most flourishing- country paper ; in South Canterbury. In 18S3, he founded the "Oeraldine Guardian," and seven years ago he retired from .newspaper work,- but still contributed to the Press occasionally. The late Mr. Twomey took a keon interest m politics, and ■ was always a staunch sup.- ' porter of the Liberal Government, iii 18S4 he aspired into entering- Parliament, and it was v.'hjle contesting- the Gladstone, seat against Captain Suiter that he made his/ maiden speech, m which.. he; advocated a State Bank and State ; Buildings of working .-men's hbme,s. .He was defeated in;that elecrUon, 3Ln'd m 1887 he. con tested the same constituency against Mr. A- ■E. G. Rhodes,. .but was defeated by sixty-- • three A-dtes: Mr. Twomey was called to tiro Legialative Council m 1806, but after the, death of Mr. Seddon, was not re-apppintedi ■ While a,: strong- boliever m party, pol i t les, *f r. Twomey >yag an o,utspolVon. cri tic pfct, political fi'iend or tin .■sHisvhftaJth: for; the past tiil'ot' vetu'.M '••..hflfl .. not be«m ■ ydi'y good, nrsd hiß.decitlV vt^as suddan, ' -

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZTR19211112.2.9

Bibliographic details

PERSONS, PLEBS & PLUTES, NZ Truth, Issue 834, 12 November 1921

Word Count
1,468

PERSONS, PLEBS & PLUTES NZ Truth, Issue 834, 12 November 1921

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