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NEWS AND NOTES

Mr. J. R. Hart recently disposed of Wallflower to a Washtlyke sportsman.

Antler changed hands recently and is now owned m Hastings where he is trained by W. Whittaker.

W. Donovan left tor Sydney, on Thursday with Duo, Athens 11., Hula G'ni, Big Chief and Kick Off.

On his return from Sydney W. Donovan will take up his new position as private trainer to Mrs. M. A. Perry.

Those -who were waiting to be on Ruddy at Riccarton will be disappointed, for the All Red gelding will not be there.

Teka, -who went wrong on the eve of the Otaki meeting, is now running out on his owner's place at Waimarama.

Honey Bee has been turned out for a spell. Hia owner, Mr. C. Haldane, has another colt — a biped — to worry about now.

The Aviping out of the Napier Park Club knocked the seaside town bandy, and the residents are now up m arms and are going to do big things.

• Mr. Jost, the Queensland racing man recently deceased, m relating racing reminiscences, said he once had an offer of £2000-- to lose a race worth £1500.

The sale of the stallion Heather Mixture is reported from Gisborne. The son of St. Serf now belongs to Mrs. M. A. Perry and will take up stud duty at Otatara.

Concession betting was introduced m Britain by Mr. .Robinson, a Victorian bookmaker, at the- Lingfteld meeting last month. The sporting newspapers forecast • that concession betting will lind favor with small punters; though it will not be easy to support favorites, as their prices are usually, very short.

A writer m the ".Sydney Sportsman" says: , "It is reported that the New Zealand trainer, 11. Telford, prior to, leaving- here last -yeelc, engaged the light-weight jockey C. Stephens to ride for him m the Dominion during- thecoming season, and has given him a retainer of £300 per year. Stephens, who learned his business with the late Mark Whitty's stable, met with a deal of success during the present season m Tasmania, and is reported as being very capable.

Gisb.orne concludes to-day. The French colt Le Traquet, is described as standing 17 hands, and a course with such sharp ' tiirns as Ep-som-would not suit such a big fellow. The annual meeting of the members of the Wellington Racing' Club will be held on September 30. It is considered certain that there will be an election for the office of stewards. ..' Tho "woolbrokers" would- not deal m Cantoris scrip at Timaru last week, and Avhen the good thing got beaten there was much joy m the ranks of the punters. - . ,'■' The racing clubs are still up m arms because the Government insists on collaring tho tote fractions. " It should be pointed out that the clubs still have the right to pay out the fractions to the rightful owners, i.e., the public, so why not do so? A Melbourne writer, m discussing the victory of Mountain God m the V.R.C. Grand National, states that Stan Reid was as fit as his mount. This is as it should be, but how often does one see the rider beaten, long 1 before his mount is done with. It will be remembered that the Racing Commission of 1910 suggested certain amalgamations but none of them were carried out. The 1921 Combmission did not fall into a similar mis* take. It simply forced the amalgamations suggested by wiping out some clubs. The stallion Masterpiece was last season located m the Far North of Auckland, where he had a big list of mares. Some of .his youngsters will later on race at the Waipapakauri meeting, which is one of the new clubs granted a permit by the Racing Commission. The MacKenzie Racing Club "will hold its meeting at Fairlie, sqme forty miles m from Timaru. The new club has got some very enthusiastic members, and m a recent canvas of the district £3000 was secured m a fortnight towards the cost of 'a property for a racecourse. A puzzling point m connection with the findings of the Racing Commission is, what is to become of the funds of the clubs which are wiped out? Several of them own, very valuable properties and it will be interesting to see how the funds are disposed of. It should be a good spec to belong to some of them. Whether Parliament, when it meets m September, will adopt the report of the Racing Commission is a widely discussed topic m racing circles. The general opinion is that the Commission's report will have a majority m "the Lower House, but there may be trouble m getting it through the Legislative Council. The Manawatu Racing Club will m future have to put on a one day Winter meeting, as the Racing Commission has chopped a day off its Summer fixture. It should suit the Awapuni body to amalgamate with the local Hunt Club and hold a two days' Winter meeting, the same as is done at Hastings m the winter. In the past the C.J.C. stewards have been prone to pride themselves that the Riccarton track was IT as far as a racecourse was concerned. It will •come as a shock to the tony mob to find that the Racing Commission has decided that it must bank its track at Cutts' corner and also turning into the straight before another permit will be issued. .The action of the Racing Commission m wiping out big clubs like Avondale, Gisborne and Napier, and giving permits to small country clubs will not be well received by horse owners for the clubs named give very big stakes, which .the new clubs cannot hope ever to do. It will also mean that the big clubs will get much bigger fields as owners will not patronise the "smalls." The newly formed Waimarino Racing Club, which has been granted a totallsator permit by the Racing Commission, is speedily getting its course into order. Its members have already subscribed £2500 towards the cost of the course, and a saw mill owner has. promised to donate the timber for the buildings. The course is situated about four miles from Ohakune on the road to RaetiJii. The Baldoyle Derby winner, Pucka Sahib, was sent over from Ireland to take his place m the Epsom classic. His mentor is Dr. Col. McCabe, and as that gentleman ti'ained two other English Derby winners m Orby and Signorietta, he should have had a good idea of what was expected. from a colt equal to gaining classic honors. He is •credited with saying 1 that Pucka Sahib is a better stayer than Orby, and had more speed than Signorinetta, and yet the colt did no better than run eighth, after getting away last. "Digger" writes as follow^: "The arrangements at Trentham last w,eeks were generally voted satisfactory, but one heard numerous complaints about the working of the Jockeys' Board, m the centre of the course. This board was sometimes not complete when the tote had closed, and if one depended on it for information it was odds on you were "shut off the tote. There were also instances of wrong jockeys for .several horses. This is' very annoying and doesn't help one m the task of sorting out winners." Up to May 2G the leading 1 sire m Britain was Swynford (John o' Gaunt — Canterbury Pilgrim) with a total of £ 14^313. Sunstar (£10,300) was secondhand IJemberg (£5155) third. The latter's son, Lemonora, has since won the Paris Grand Prix, worth £16,000, and that sum will make Lemberg now an easy first. It is worth noting that the sensational grey, The Tetrarch, does' not appear among the first 50 sires,, but his sire, Roi I-lerode, •. is 24th with £1093 opposite his name. The Carbine horse, Spearmint, is- 28th (£985). . A feature of the Racing Commissioner's report, which does not seem entirely satisfactory, is the licensing of several new clubs which are situated m remote country districts. By all means let these clubs have their day's outing, but they do not want a totalisator permit. Take the case of Motueka. How is a club like this ever to get going. Outside owners will not send horses there, and the only ones to compete will be grass fed hacks. A far better scheme would be to give these clubs a non-totalisator meeting, and their prize money should be supplied by the Metropolitan club of the district. Sixty or seventy pound? would supply the funds liecessary and the country folks would have a good day's outing. Sarchedon, who is claimed to be tKe best looking Tetrarch horse m England, has been sold to Mr. P. Miller, and he will take up stud duty along with Demosthenes and Magpie. Sarchedon was raced by Sir James Buchanan, and ranked as quite one of the best two-year-olds m 1919.. He was only beaten once m his six efforts at this age, and won such 1 high-class races as the Newmarket Bedford Two-Year-Old Stakes, Ascot Coventry Stakes, Newmarket July Stakes, Newmarket Clearwell Stakes, and deadheated for the Newmarket Criterion Stakes with Glenaskaki, to whom he conceded 121bs. As a throe-year-old he was prior to the Derby tried superior to tho ultimate winner, Spion Kop, and m tho trial he beat other first-class horses m Paragon and Comrade who won the Grarid Prix soon afterwards. In the Derby, Sarchedon ran a good fourth, and was placed second m both the St. George Stakes and Goodwood Sussex . Stakes. '

The rising three-year-old, Lord Martian (Martian — Lady ,Lucy), was shipped to Sydney this week. On arrival .there he is to be trained by Jack Lowe. Some of the visitors to Trentham on galloping mornings are shocked at the language used by some of the stable hands. The committee should instruct the caretaker to look into this mattex'.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZTR19210730.2.68.1.9

Bibliographic details

NEWS AND NOTES, NZ Truth, Issue 820, 30 July 1921

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1,638

NEWS AND NOTES NZ Truth, Issue 820, 30 July 1921

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