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NEWS AND NOTES.

C.J.C. meeting concludes to-day. Lincoln Steeples, three miles, to-day. Marton nominations close to-night. Matatane is again ampngst the activ« brigade at Hastings. M. McArten will probably' ride for the Highden stables this season. Three of life's worries: Death, taxation and can't-be-beaten horses. When next Hyginas races it will probably be over hurdles. He is being schooled regularly at Hastings and jumps well.

Jackaroo has again been put into work at Trentham by A. Goodman. Early Dawn is again m work at Hastings and looks nice and bright after her spell. 1 Stewards still sitting tight and saying | nuffin', while open play is knocking at the front door. There are about 25 two-year-olds m work on the Hastings tracks, which is i more than usual. Royal Exchange is bearing a solid appearance and should be a useful stake 1 earner this season. While on a visit to Trentham last week T. Pritchara" contracted influenza ana liafl . to lay up for a few days. R. Barlow sustained a severe loss last week when the promising four-year-old Generalissimo died from an internal complaint. It is a bit of a mystery how some coots find backers m a race. I s'pose it comes from people who would rather bet than eat, J. McLaughlin, who has been laid aside at Trentham for some weeks, is now about again and able to supervise the work of his team. Two New Zealanders in< H. J. Thompson and Stan Reid were at the head of the list of winning riders over hurdles m Victoria this season. J. Ware is training Demagogue at Hastings, but Hendra has been sent to Gisborne where he will be fired and turned out for a lengthy spell. The Mountain Knight— Fairy Gold, two-year-old trained by L. Wilson, is the biggest youngster m work at Hastings. Despite his size he shows great promise. A. McAulay is keeping Miramar going and the bay gelding will be raced m some of the hunters' events at the spring meeting. Sturdee and First Line both went wrong on the eve of the final payments for the National and they had to forfeit their engagements. J. W. Lowe has decided that the Buckwheat colt m his stable can do with a bit of time and he is not being bustled on the tracks. The Marton trainer, Jim Coyle, did not go south with his National team but stayed behind to get a couple of hunters ready for the Taranaki fixture. Handy seems to have improved by his operation for throat troubles arid he has already demonstrated on the tracks that he has lost none of his pace. Matatua Is being got ready for the Marton meeting next month. He has been physicked since he last raced and this lightened him up but he looks well. The Solferlno— Elysium youngster m J. McLaughlin's stables at Trentham has been named EdendaJe, which seems rather appropriate for a son of Elysium. Shamrock and Wake are both doing a lot of work at Trentham. The lastnamed seems to be a bit on the burly side but nothing pulls up better than this maro after working. Opiate Is a greatly improved horse for the race he had at Trontham m July and he is now starting to shape up a bit. The half-brother to Bon Revs should pay his way this season. Lord Usk, by Blankeney 11., for whom Mr. G. Hume gave 500 guineas m Melbourne, is doing a little work at Trentham but is not being hurried. In conformation Lord Usk greatly resembles Kllrush. The touts at Trentham have ail got a good word for the All Black — Martian Princess filly m A. Godfrex''s stables and some go-so far as to declare her the best youngster at headquarters. The two Martian youngsters purchased by tho Messrs. Riddiford at the Christchurch sales, have been gelded and are now starting to do a bit of work, but they will not be right to race early. No horse, working at Hastings looks better than- does Lovematch. The Napier and Hawke's Bay Cup winner should prove a cheap purchase for her new owner. She is now trained by W. Stone. 80-Peep and Blackmail are being worked the reverse way at Trentham, with a view to racing at Avon- 1 dale, where the Challenge Stakes winner has an engagement m- the ! Guineas. Silk Rein (Provocation— Silken Rein) is now trained by C. Pritchard at Trentham. Other additions to the same trainer s team are a big powerful-looking gelding by Martello, and a beautifullyshaped bay mare by Walmangu. An announcement of Interest to breeders Is that the well-known sire, Mountain Knight, will again be at the cervices of owners of brood mares this season The fashionably-bred grandson of Wallace Is to stand at Te Mahanga Stud. R. Gooseman does not usually bother with two-year-olds, but this season the veteran has several m work including; a couple of fillies by the Martagon horse Crown Imperial II; They are halfsisters to Teka and Indigo, and are nice sorts. Ernest Brown, who has been connected with Joe Ayre's stables for a long time, ! is now launching out on his own account as a public trainer. He will have Matty and Spangle under his care and also a couple of two-year-olds by MountainKnight. The ' Solferlno two-year-old, owned by D. Kemp at Hastings, has lately been broken m and is now a daily attendant on the tracks. The same owner Is trying Grange over hurdles and the chestnut gelding jumps fairly well for a beginner. In America there Is a three-year-oia called Man o f War that is reckoned the best horse ever seen there. Already he has run nine furlongs m 1.45 1-5, and a mile m 1.35 4-5. Man o' War cost 1000 gns. as a yearling, but money would not buy him now. . F. Ellis .seems to bo. having a hard job to get the beef off the Martian— Secret Link filly, but she is doing plenty of nice work and doing it well. Her stable companion by Martian from Torquato is also doing useful work and appears to have a lot of pace. Despite the big amount of work they do Blackmail and 80-Peep both keep very fresh, and the former got away from i her attendant one morning last week but was soon caught again. 80-Peep is a wonder and she keeps on the big side despite the hard season she had .She looks as we. 1 ! to-day as ever she did. i A / te ?, a twelve years' career on the ! turf, that game little stallion Raheny ! met his fate laßt month, when he frac- ; turert a pastern when racing m the Stee- •• pleehase at the T.T.C. meeting at Mow- • bray H« was a good, all- | rounder, winning on the flat, over burriles, and over fences, and ran m 197 races for 29 wins. i At the annual meeting of the Hawke's i Bay Jockey Club, Messrs. J. Landols and G. D. Beatson were elected to' fill the vacancies on the committee caused by the resignations of Messrs. T. H. Lowry and R. J. White. Both the new stewards J are well known and highly popular as i racehorse owners and their presence on , the committee should strengthen that i body. Insurrection is doing a lot of strong work at Trentham and it looks as if he is being got ready for the Avondale Cup. The trip is pointed . to as J. W. j Lowe is also keeping Wake moving alonsy, 1 and she has an engagement m the Guineas, while the Boniform — Innocence " cot may be sent up for the Avonrla'e Stakes. The last-named is a very nice youngster and has a lot of pace. Abbot's Trace, ridden by S. Donoghue, fell m the Derby at Epsom, and relative In this the "London Daily Telegraph" published the following interesting story relative to a dream: On Derby Day morning , Mrs. Templeton, wife of the jockey i who rode He Goes, told her husband that i sho had had a most vivid dream. She ,«aw the race for the Derby, and Donoghue was brought down. Mrs. Temple;..n wsis- bo Impressed that she felt enm-r-'illsd to tell hpr husband, who assured jior that there was nothing m it, as Donoghue was without a mount m the race. (It was only m the early part of Mie afternoon that the arrangement was • made for him to ride Abbot's Trace.) This afternoon, m the jockeys' dressing-room at Epsom, Templeton toid Donoghue nbout his wife's dream, and he added: "I purposely did not tell you before the race yesterday because I did not want to upset you. But I thought I would tell you now. It seems so wonderful that it should have come true." Donoghue then recalled that on the morning of the race he happened to mention to a friend, who was once a famous cricketer, that . he had no ride m the Dei-by. His friend merely remarked: "Well, perhaps it is an well. You will see it comfortably from the stand. If you rode you might get ' brought down, with the course as it is I !inw." '

"toad*"™' t>raSS iS generally , won fo y a Spanner is m regular work at Napier, but he will not be raced for some time. X,, M £f B> Tj> , Joll ' s co 'ors may be carried by Plaversack and Passing Through this s eft son. Ethiopian was sent home after th« The imported mare, Shrill has a v«ark™^ impo # ed Ch eloma is to be repreyou don't want to be wanted? Back'sheesh (Eezonian Sequinnette) seems to have a temper of his own and requires a man to ride him work. Amythas stands out amongs our wf a mokes as conspicuously as a ere'enhaired child would m a nigger's family. I am pleased to know that beauty is only skin deep, for this leaves room inside me for a lot of cussedness concerning crooks. There Is no chance of punters getting e Z e n £? £ ci v *| llerslle losses over Lafl y to the stud mare 3 been retlred The public have as much use for favorites that run last as you and I have tor a side pocket m our shroud, or cash m our coffin. who is engaged m the sprint rK s %l Rlccar l on . had been beating Painty Step on the tracks before being shipped south. • AH our racecourse stewards appear to have lost their punch, and suffering from strabismus, or have grown too considerate to wrong-doers. Roy Reed and Harold Young- ar« leaving Sydney at the end of the month and will be back m 'line for the Hunt Club meeting at Awapuni. Some of the form shown at Timaru was bad enough to make a. man suspicious enough to look for splinters m a home-made sandwich. "Nothing for nothing" is the racecourse motto, and is ancient law, for before Adam started the human race his wife cost him a rib. The Riccarton trainer, R. Emerson, has been down with the "flu" during the week and his team has been under the eye of his son Charles. If half one hears Is true the Avondale meeting next month will resemble an Auckland Cup fixture as horsas from all parts are to be taken north. I am quite satisfied that if there were horso races and betting m the next world, quit© a number of Wellington sports would suicide straight away. As it Is only five months to tho Melbourne Cup punters have already picked the winner, and are putting it on Red Cardinal. Bring out the V.C.'s ! Old Consistency lies a mouldering m his grave, and I vow if his soul tried any marching on among our gee-gees it would be run m for riotous behavior. Punters do not mind losing when they are satisfied that their judgment has back-fired on them, but they will squeal if ■they find out some one has put water instead of petrol m their tanks. The Godbys, who are at present making a name for themselves m Melbourne, originally came from Dunedin, where their father was a pressman for many years. Johnny Walker is doing a lot of strong work at Trentham, but his owner finds it a most difficult task to get the condition off him. . He is intended for the Avondale meeting. At Trentham, Vindictive and Militaire are both doing well under H. A. Telford. They are getting through plenty of strong work and should be ready to race early (n the season. You might just as well pat a mo-car on the head .and expect it to wag its tail and follow you home, as to expect a gee-gee to win when the boy on top has decided It didn't-oughter. No one will blame racecourse stewards for being captiously critical of late. On the contrary they have been as peaceful i as pet poodles, for which the bushrang- I ers are gra.teful. The intentions of some of our saddle sitters are no doubt good enoivgh to please the Recording Angel,, but their perform- j a.nces play right into the hands of Old ! Nick. Race after race punters fasten to three horses. Whether the balance of the field are out for airings, have no chance, or are started to make a betting market, is as much a .mj'stery as a cheap hashhouse stew. In Victoria the racing clubs are doing j their best to cheapen the cost of starting m races. The Godfrey Watson Steeples and the Leamington Hurdles at Caul- j field were both worth £700, yet the nor- ] ination and acceptance fee only came to £3. . J I At Wagga last month, on the retire- I ment of Mr. H. H. Hughes from the i position of stipendiary Gteward, tha dis- i trlct jockeys presented him with a silver entree dish.. I wonder was this an ex- ' pression of gratitude, admiration, or thanksgiving? The Indian rajahs continue to pay fabulous prices for good-class horses. The latest English gee-gee of class to be purchased for the land of rupees and rice is Our Stephen, for whom 8000 gns. was received. The horse is named after Stephen Donoghue, Fogland's crack jockey. The Government of Ontario (Canada) recently imposed a tax of £200 per race day on all racecourses where the track was one mile m circumference, and £10004 on racecourses where the race track was only a quarter of a mile. This should jar the circus-ring soup-plate track courses well and truly. When a jockey on a beaten favorite ; brings his mount out from the rails with 1 the very apparent intention of jostling an opponent, the stewards should ask him a question after the race Is over. The present practice seems to be to overlook this particular style of foul riding. Sports In Tasmania are beginning to look with a certain amount of favor on the suggestion that bookmakers should bo legalised m the Apple Island, The movement is receiving strong local support, particularly m Labor circles. Strongest opposition Is coming from the I old Conservative race clubs, and as "Tassy" is Conservative to the core it is more than probable their views will prevail. Tha Canadian owner, Commander J. K. L. Ross, who races on a big scale m. America, is again buying; horses at a high price. He purchased the crack two-year-old Baby Grand about two months ago, the price reported being £6000. They do not spare two- year- olds m America. Baby Grand is a May foal (equivalent to December out here), and yet. up to the beginning of June he had started eleven times for seven wins, a second and two thirds, so that he only once missed a place. He won at. his first two starts after his purchase by Commander Ross. The result of the English Derby sent a thrill of delight through Australian sportsmen, as the winner, Spion Kop, is a grandson of Carbine, being by Spearmint, who was also a Derby winner. Spion Kop is raced by a son of the late | Major Eustace Loder, the man who was fortunate enough to have his colors carried by Pretty Polly and Spearmint m successive years. Spearmint Is one of the select equines that have won the English Derby and Grand Prix of Paris. Tetratema, the favorite for this year's Prtue Ribbon, bore out the prophecy of England's leading turf authority.. "The Special Commissioner," by falling to run it out. I

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZTR19200814.2.49.1.7

Bibliographic details

NEWS AND NOTES., NZ Truth, Issue 771, 14 August 1920

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2,751

NEWS AND NOTES. NZ Truth, Issue 771, 14 August 1920

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