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PETITION PESTS

Trouble m a Tram

WHY HUDSON GOT HOT,

Trivial Case Dismissed.

(From "Truth's" Auckland Rep.)

Frank Eaton Hudson was charged at the Auckland Police Court on Monday last, before Mr. E. D. Mosley, S.M., with having destroyed a petition, valued at Is, the property of the Auckland No-License Council. He was defended by Mr. Dickson. William McDaimarcl said, the document had a . .. MORAL; BUT NO FINANCIAL VALUE, and the prosecution did not want punishment, taut protection. . The S.M.: You will get that if you prove your case. Isaac McLeod said he was a timber merchant and a J.P., and that on August 20 he was travelling from Helensville to Auckland, and had with him the petition. He was seeking signatures on the train, and was asking a passenger to sign, when defendant requested a glance at the document. Witness handed over the "dry" document to Hudson, who immediately folded it, and then tore it to shreds. He denied to Lawyer Dickson that he pestered Hudson so much that defendant tore it to avoid further annoyance. Constable Reed said he saw defendant, who admitted he tore the document up, because he was being pestered to sign it. Mr. Dickson: I would do that myself. The S.M.: If you did -I would have to fine you. Three farmers travelling to Auckland on that date gave evidence to the effect that McLeod went up and down the carriage ARGUING WITH THE PASSENGERS, and that everybody m the train seemed glad when Hudson tore it to pieces. Two of. them said they signed the petition to get rid of the petition pesterer. His Worship said it seemed from the evidence of Hudson's fellow-passengers that McLeod's enthusiasm had run away with his discretion, and he would dismiss the case as trivial.

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PETITION PESTS NZ Truth, 5 October 1918

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