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HOW HOBEN DIED

Ex-New Zealand Editor's Sad End

DIES IN A MENTAL HOSPITAL IN MELBOURNE. Chnstcborch Case Re-called.

"Truth**" readers will remember the Hoben separation case which was tried before Magistrate Bailey at Ghristchurch, several months ago, m the course of which Mr. E. D. Hoben, a Christchurch journalist, made, most astounding allegations against his wife, who, however, was successful m defending herself, proving that her husband was m the wrong. The case was a sort of a local "cause celebre," owing to the position of both parties to the suit, the husband, Mr. Ernest D. Hoben, being at the time editor of the Christchurch "Evening Star," and his wife (C Crichton Imrie), the conductor of the Ladles Page m the "Lyttelton Times." W<hen the case came before tho Christchurch Court the charges made against his wife by Mr. Hoben, Mrs. Hoben alleged t^at her husband had for some time previously been SUFFERING FROM MENTAIi DELUSIONS and Insisted that dais charges were groundless. The sequel to tins sad story has Just been pjtmTnuiin w*y tpn to "Truth" from Melbourne, and tho result fully bears out Mrs. Hoben's assertion that her husband was at times "out of -his mind" and suffered from delusion*. Mrs. Hoben, on her return from Tokio, whither she went on a literary Tntmrfrtn, discovered that her husband was seriously ill hi Bjbw A*griT»7Tt, Melbourne. She remained with him d&Qy for six weeks, and m his lucid moments he referred with regret to the court case hi Christchurch and craved her forgiveness for the allegations he then made' against her. As ha seemed to ■have improved since her coming to him, she took steps to get him released from the asylum, undertaking to sco Mm cared for for the future should such be necessary. The doctor m charge at Kew, under the circumstances agreed and the necessary papers were filled up and duly signed. When the day arrived for Mr. Hoben's discharge, two other doctors connected with the institution would not permit his removal from the institution. They read to Mrs. Hoben the* reports of the specialists who bad legally committed her husband to Kew, and these were of such a character that they left her without any ground .of complaint against the medical men wl*D had vetoed his removal It' seems that before he was committed to Kew Hospital for the Insane, Mr. Hoben was an inmate of St. Vincent's Hospital and toftd made vile allegations against his nurse there. .Fortunately the chaises «gainnt th* nurse were made to medical men who had had EXPERIENCE OF PABANQIACS. and they acted . accordingly and. promptly. On January 4, Mrs. Hoben received fi long- communication from Dx. Gamble, the m*"**"*.! superintendent of Kew Asylum, of which the floilowin* ia an. extract: Hospital for the Insane, Ksw, Mtfibctuxie, January 4, Itn. Be Mr. Ernest D. Hoben, Dear Madajn, — I regret to Inform you that your husband's condition has now become critical and I fear he win not survive Mnyr than a few days. There Is, I thtnV, ltt£l» doubt that he has suffered from mental infirmity with periodical exaccerbatidn of symptoms for many years past. The* peculiarity of bis conduct and the nature* of the delusions which evidently afflicted htm were colored by his temperament.' . . . Temperamentally your husband is morbidly suspicious and has an undue' ire-aita-Hrm of the ego; and persons, so endowed very frequently develop symptoms. of paranoia, or chronic delusional insanity, as did your husband years ago. — I am. yours very truly, (Signed) M. GAMBT.F,, Ififttiii*^) Superintendent, j A* tawn"^*"^ by the above Mr. Hoben was- ntniriTig fast, and be died a few days later. It was a sad end to the career of an able. If not brGQant, journalist, wfeoy m his day, bad held several of the "ptoms** of bis profession. While rTTTffgnr of the "New Zealand Times;** Weßfmgton, bis eonrtnet was flnnae--times considered strange by members of the staff, xa& his unfortnnatexlameetio quarrels, tbMtji «*nimti»ti^fl ta. the court case m Christchterch. wex* not altogether a surprise to those who had served under Mm The cause of Mr. Hoben's demise is to be regretted, bat the fact that the mental expert at Kew Asytmn says that his mental trouble had afflicted him for many years past, ought to dispel any doubt, that may have been m the minds of the people of Christchurch -as to the truth of . MBS. HOBEN'S STATEMENTS * concerning- her husband's mental' condition, and of the absolutely groundless nature of the charges he then made against his wife, who, had repeatedly nursed him through many severe attacks of mental affliction. "Truth" feels that. In the interest of his widow, these facts ought to be. made as widely known m New Zealand as possible, particularly hi view of the fact that the Lyttleton "Times/*: in which office Mrs. Hqben edited a daily page for women, for three years, gave full publicity to the outrageous allegations of her demented hnshand.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZTR19180223.2.47

Bibliographic details

NZ Truth, NZ Truth, Issue 662, 23 February 1918

Word Count
824

HOW HOBEN DIED NZ Truth, Issue 662, 23 February 1918

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