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SINGER AND SLOGGER.

Fred Dyer m New York.

A real chatty letter has been received from Fred Dyer, and published m the "Sydney Sportsman," by "BoxerMajor." Dyer is the boxer and vocalist who travelled through New Zealand less than two years ago, and who was willing to appear m the ring m this country, but owing to the war and Boxing Associations' inactivity, tho opportunity of seeing this boxer m action was denied New Zealanders. Dyer writes: "I have not forgotten you and your wonderful country. Every opportunity I get I boom Australia, and have been In some very lively arguments. I have boomed Darcy as much as I could, because, m my humble opinion, he ought to be heavyweight champion of tho world. Jack Dillon la about the best of the bunch; he and Darcy would put up a great tight, but Darcy would bo too clever and fast for him m a twenty-round bout. "I see George Chip is on his way to Sydney to fight Darcy. 1 have never seen him fight, but they have a very big opinion of him over here, and many people expect him to knock Darcy out, bo let's hope Les will keep up his form. "1 won another fight here a couple of nights ago. I took JefT Smith's place at a minute's notlce v and outboxed George Ash, a bl|>', strong fellow, who puts up groat fights with men like Dillon and BuUHiib Levlnsky. He outweighed mo 161t>. bo I consider I did well. My knee still trouble* mo though, and besides having to wear a protector, I have to keep on my too right through tho bout, a« a quick stop back would throw it out. "The theatres are all closed up, the weather being »o hot and oppressive,

and the boxing game is also very quiet, so I am not doing much. Picture houses are about the only thing open. I have been dolnpc some good work for moving picture firms, and was offered a very good contract with one firm to play character parts; but I . don't know exactly what my plans for the winter will be. I have some very good offers for my vaudeville act, and am singing m great form, so I am going to wait a few weeks before accepting anything definite. "Best wishes to all my friends m Australia." There is no question but that my musical friend is booming Les Darcy. says "Boxer- Major." Here is a cutting from one paper: , . "Speaking of Les Darcy, there is one man m New York who is firmly convinced that Darcy can whip Jess Willard., Yes, 'tis true. Fred Dyer is the man who makes the bold statement. "He watched Willard again yesterday and after the big champion's work was over Dyer waxed enthusiastic over Darcy. 'He can whip Willard, I tell you.' said Dyer. " "But he's only a little middleweight,' was offered. '' 'I don't care about that. He has the strength of four Vniddleweights, can hit and can box rings around Willard. Oh, I know that Ketchel tried it. He fell before Jack Johnson, it's true, but that has nothing to do with Darcy. Les would have knocked Ketchel out inside of ten rounds. Any man who comes to him and fights him will go out. Willard would never lay a glove on him. If Mike Gibbons goes there to, fight him, I warn you, don't bet on him, for Les will surely knock him out. He is the greatest fighter m the world to-day.' " Another paper says (amongst a Jot more m praise of Dyer's fighting) r "He then met one of the toughest middlewelghts In New York, Franklin Notter. The way Fred handled Notter was a revelation; the ease and grace with which he moved inside and outside of terrific swings and hooks and the manner m which he would attack Notter, fairly had the fans on their feet during- the entire bout. It was voted one of the greatest contests seen m the famous New York arena for many a moon." And it winds up an interesting sketch of Dyer's career thus: "To hear Dyer talk of Australia you would think It a land flowing with milk and honey and good fellowship."

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZTR19160909.2.62.7

Bibliographic details

SINGER AND SLOGGER., NZ Truth, Issue 586, 9 September 1916

Word Count
712

SINGER AND SLOGGER. NZ Truth, Issue 586, 9 September 1916

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