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NEWS AND NOTES.

Jumping season practically over. Don't forget nominations for Danne•vlrke close on Monday next. "Bungebah" Jack Galnsford Is still winning races m Sydney with his smart Malstcr colt Kahonjl. Morning will bo nominated at Daunevirke, but as ho is not likely to get m at the minimum his owner may not ask him to carry the grandstand. Tho Mouso was lucky to win Die Hunt Club Cup, for W. Adams saved, every inch of ground, while Oratonu' covered a lot of extra ground. Hotter handled on the last day the Tlmuru horso walked In. Tho Dates Committee met al Christchurch during National week, and ruled out tho objection of tho Southland Club against tho North Otapo Club racing on January 3 and 4. Thus tho two clubs will again cla^h this year. , Tho Northern tnuners were not greatly taken with tho southern two-year-olds. The ChoUebcre stables, In particular, which generally have a couple of embryo champion:!, p.eem» very weak In pood ones this year. Most of the visitor!} have a good word for the Imported youngster In It. ODonnell's stable.**, and ho 1:» jlt'ScriboU :i« rome. thing very different front tlir usual run of horses Imported to thiy country.

Note this on your cuff: "Bet with them when they back Slogan." Meltchikoft was very nearly bringing off a big; surprise on Saturday. Prairie Fire can gallop fast, but, unfortunately, he's given to bleeding. Silver Shield will be useful over hurdles at the South meetings this spring. Starter R. E. Harley Was been appointed to act for the North Canterbury and Oxford Jockey Club. Eiccarton was again a triumph for the "bookie" fellows, and the punters are once more scratching. In the Hunt Club Cup at the second fence of the Kennell's double, Yokel ran off and took Gondolier with him. Golden Grape, whom one trainer referred to as the Morning -of the South, ran off m each of his Riccarton starts. Ruatangata. got into one of the fences m the Spreydon Hack Hurdles and he had a' very big tip as the result of the knock. Being too keen at the barrier caused A. Oliver on Glenroy to catch the tapes on Saturday, and he got a 'nasty cut on the face. Morning and Tim Doolan both started m. the three big steeplechases at Riccarton, and the pair negotiated fifty odd fences. » The C.J.C. intends to devote the whole of its net profits to the Patriotic Funds. Other racing- clubs are sure to follow suit. While contesting the Aylesbury Steeplechase on Saturday, Captain Mackey broke a blood vessel and had to be pulled up. ' Judging by the way Braeburn jumped some of his fences at Riccarton he should be quite able to get over a steeplechase course. Mr. W. Richmond, owner of Hereford, recently acquired a half interest m St. Elmn, who promises to turn out a very useful hurdle horse. During National week, tn"e Accident Fund trustees went into several claims, all of which were adjusted satisfactorily to the parties concerned. . The Riccarton trainer, F. Holmes, Is back again after his trip to 'Frisco. He reports a very enjoyable time, but confesses to be glad to be home again. Get ready for Slogan. It will be pay put next time. On Saturday he got a very bad run m the Heathcote Handicap and was flying over everything at the finish. • Kirn, who gave promise of developing into, a useful 'chaser, came to an untimely end on Saturday, when he fell and broke his back while contesting the Lincoln Steeplechase. * It is said that the Chokebore and Yaldhurst stables will not have a representative at the coming Ashburton meeting. This will, no doubt, cause the small owners to nominate freely. Reports from Hastings state that the Messrs. Williams, of Gisborne, have purchased Ngatarawa, formerly the property of Mr. E. J. Watt, and m future Chortle and Co. will be trained on the private track there. Haumakaka was made a hot order In the Redcllffs Handicap on Saturday, but inability to begin beat him, and though he finished well he could not reaoh Frince Laddo or Potentiality, who grot a break on the favorite over the first part of the race. In the "stipes" report to the Racing Conference, the absence of good jumping horses was commented upon. "Spearmint" has only been m the game for about twenty years, hut jln that time he cannot remember a better quartette than Morning, Morecambe, El Gallo and Tim Doolan. In Art, Mr. G. Fulton has got hold of a pretty smart hurdle horse. The halfbrother to Vladimir is held m high respect by the touts at Riccarton, as several times he has run over the schooling sfences faster than the National horses. His record over fences is two starts, two wins. As usual the National- meeting saw a large attendance of leading Bportsmen from all parts of the Dominion. Secretaries A. E. Whyte (W.R.C.), G. M. Proctor (Oamaru), C. Fraser (Timaru), A. A. Fooks (Ashburton), H. L. James (Dunedin), and W. Saunders (Southland) were amongst the visitors. After the race for the Heathcote Handicap on Saturday, L. Wilson, rider of Blackheart, had the representative of the gelding's owners before the committee, for making some remarks which Wilson took as referring to his bona fides. The "stip.es" assured Wilson that they were perfectly satisfied with his showing. Lconta has now been placed twice m a National. He would have been a lot closer to Hurakia. at the finish of the big race last year had ho not lost a lot of ground over the first two fences. On Saturday ho was well placed early m the race, but he took off too far at the second fence and came down, giving C. Price a Lad shaking. When Teviotdale won the Woolston Plato at Riccarton, his owner had to go to 180 guineas to keep him. Previously when ho scored m the same race he was bought m for BO guineas. Last week, the owner of the second horse got £118 10s out of the joke, while Mr. C. Machcll owner of the, winner lost £20 10s on the transaction. No wonder he looked a bit ruffled after the horse was knocked down to him. Undoubtedly the fittest jumper seen out at Riccarton was Tim Doolan. Had Morning been stripped like Tim Doolan and been seasoned wUh the samo racing, he might not have made that fatal mistake In the National. No ono will contest the statement that he was a better horse m the Lincoln Steeples — m which he led the wholo way with 12.3 on lila back and never mado the semblance of an error — than he was earlier In the week. His owner and trainer were unlucky m one way for It was Intended to raco him at Napier on the second day, but this was cancelled owing to the bad going. The abandonment of the Trentham fixture further upset their plans, so he arrived at the post for the National a fit horse perhaps, but not seasoned enough for such an ordeal. What a hot pot he will henext year when he will l>e carrying the maximum 12.7. \ Kvenlng (dam of Morning) was formerly used us a shepherd's hack. It wjik after weeing her take, part and win — lut . it bti said — at a sports mooting lluit Mr. \ F. Armstrong, of Aklllo, took a UUin. 1 ; to her, and mibscqucntly acquired her for 200 guinouH from" her breeder, Mr. G. Hunter, M.t\ She was glvon to It. Gooseman to train, ami at her llrut attempt she won a hue): hurdle ra»:e at Hastings. Subsequently I tit* sister to Evening Wonder ran third In a National Hurdles and won ;•- \VauK~Mwi KU"'(*;ilfi*lia:;<\ Mho ah;o carried lu-r owncr'n colors In a National Steeples, but like The -Spaniard and Morning, bad luck <]o!w:-.'d her !n \\\\r. race which her Offiior hatf yet to win, though this y«wr n world's chnmplois m Morning carried his colors. HoH'-.-vcr". l-tveti'mj; ha;j m.id>' pooii nt tin* .'Uu.l ;.:>•! tnny yet lhn>\v jr.noihor eli;irm>lon. VU-s yea:- rho Ir. to j l»o mated with tho impialtd Merry Moments.

Sir Donald broke down m the National Hurdles. Fabrikoff was improving with each race at Riccarton. Leon- was m the market a couple of times at the C.J.C. meeting, but he did not show up. Fender was •well supported by her owner m the Heathcote Handicap on Saturday, but she failed badly!. Bee had one pop- at Riccarton, and for a mare that had not had a race since Christmas, she did wonderfully well. Potentiality is right up m the handicap now, though he has yet to win a race. StilL he won't be a maiden much longed. 4 Raupani cannot beg-in now like he did last year, but he runs well and will be dangerous In a seven or eight furlongs race. Those who were at the last fence where Harbor Light came down, say it was any odds on him defeating Hurakia had he stood up. Prior to the National Hurdles, Hurakia was credited with running a mile at Riccarton m 1.44. No wonder he scored m tho National! Uxbridge is the only horse since 1882 that has won the Australian Hurdle twice. In 1912 he carried 10.7 to victory, and on Saturday 10.13. Master Lupin surprised everybody by his good showing In the National Hurdles m which he gave.a splendid exhibition of jumping and finished third, After running a good race m the National Hurdles, m which he finished fourth, Dlavolo came out on Saturday and scored very decisively m the Sydenham Hurdles. ' When Pride of Clutha won the August. Handicap,. at-Riccar ton she had to undergo the ordeal of an Inquiry by the Judicial Committee, but the judge's placing was not disturbed. When Bluestone failed to leave the mark m the August Handicap at Riccarton, it was a regular "Knock out" blow to punters, many of whom had the bet of the meeting on the Aucklander. Palisade is a long time crediting owner L. C. Hazlltt with a stake. He was well backed for tho August Handicap at Riccarton, but though he ran a fair race, he was out of a place at the finish. Probably he Is getting a bit cunning. Mr. F. Armstrong, owner of Morning, was compensated for his bad luck m the National Steeples by his gelding winning the Beaufort and Lincoln Steeples and also by tho fact that he bred Hurakia, winner of the National Hurdles. ( Ilurakia, winner of this year's National, was m front practically the wholo way, and gave a splendid exhibition of jumping, albeit he ran down a couple of his fences. He ran m the name of Mr. F. J. Lysnar, of Gisborne, who formerly raced m an assumed name. Awuhou was doing anything on the tracks prior to tho National, but m the race he only jumped at the 'Second fenco and lost his pilot Ho was a hot order on Saturday, but ho ran badly and came down at the lv.st fence, it is tho inti-n---lion or his owner to spell him for souie months.

Bandalero was a complete failure at Riccarton. If Bore can race as well as he can buck, he is not half bad. Countess Tolstoi is well forward and should be handy at Ashburton. Look out for Crown Pearl when he has been spoke-shaved down a bit. Dear Annie is not a bad hunter but, unfortunately, she is none too sound. The big fences at Riccarton helped Bonny, who paid exes In place money. As predicted m these columns, Prince Laddo did not return from Riccarton empty handed. John Barleycorn, Sunbird and Rinaldo were m the market for the New Zealand Cup last week. That usually safe jumper Reform, lost his pilot early m the race for the Hunt Club Cup at the C.J.C. meeting. On his form at the C.J.C. meeting It seems plain that Nicomar is a better horse over a mile, than m shorter races. It's like a leaf from Captain Cook's log to read of Grey Renown winning a race. Patience, thy name is D. Anderson. Phamos ran m the colors of F. D. Jones at Riccarton. He fell and broke his neck on Saturday, which, was a bad start for "Jonah" as an owner. Dalkeith, a winner at Walmate, has joined R. Berry's stable at Oamaru. The latter has also got m hand a two-year-old by Penatea from Jessie Lewars. It ia expected that as the reault of the threat to protest against Banksia m. the Winter Cup, there will bo a rush of owners to register partnerships with their trainers. Crown Pearl la not getting any faster m his old age. The other horses wero all round him m the Heathcote Handicap afiKlccarton, but the old fellow was unequal to the task. Prior to the C.J.C. meeting, Micky Free had a gallop vrith John Barleycorn and quite held his own. Those who knew this were on him m the Avonhead Handicap and got a good price for second. Maltegardo raced very badly at the C.J.C. meeting, and at no time was she dangerous. Some of the "heads" were on her m the R'edcliffe Handicap, but after showing up two furlongs from home sho stopped badly In the run to the post. T. Pritchard took Captain Glossop and Lady Black to the C.J.C. Winter meeting, but neither was equal to gaining a bracket. The mare showed enough pace on the middle day to suggest that she will not bo long m winning a race. R. Berry's imported horse, Kentlock, is getting plenty of patronage from Southern breeders. Amongst the latest booked to the Malster horse are Aerina, dam of All Ready, and Whirlpool, dam of Grand Rapids, tho New Zealand Cup winner. Whirlpool, though 24 ye&ra old is now m foal to All llvii. After winning the Knfield Steeples at Riccarton, Grey Renown was purchased by Mr. J. Wolsley, v patron of S. Trilford's stables, ami the grey ran m hiw new owner's colors In tho Aylesbury Steeples on Saturday. After making :i very bold showing under his big weight ho was beaten Into second placo by his stable companion Oratonu.

Can anyone tell us why racing should be .curtailed, or m what way it would I advantageously affect war conditions? One, who is by The Welkin, scored m the Crimea Trial at Caulfield early this month. He was placed seven times as a two-year-old last season. All Ready was not amongst the horses submitted to sale at Christchurch last week. He has been leased to his trainer, R. McKay, and is to undergo a Xew Zealand Cup preparation. The V.R.C. committee has given itself a headache franning a rule to prohibit dummy nominations. It's love's labor lost, for the undesirable owner will always find a dummy, willing to pose as owner. The Queensland Turf Club, as the result of some pressure from the Minister of Justice, has decided that infuture all totalisator dividends will be paid out to the penny. Why cannot we have the same m the Dominion? If not, the Government should get down on the fractions. The brood mare, Nightfall, has been purchased by Mr. B. ChatTey of Moorna stud (N.S.W.). Nightfall was a good performer m the Dominion, and found her way to England, but was brought out to Victoria by Messrs. A, and J ; Tye, of the Allendale Stock Farm, Mentone, Victoria. • Colonel Hall Walker, who has long been ,a supporter on a large scale of English racing, both as a breeder and owner of racehorses, is one of those who thinlc" 1 that the Government acted v -unwisely m curtailing racing. He said no case had been made out for the interference of racing: wiLi the conduct of the war. The colonel- said that he employed 100 men m connection with his racing and breeding es- • tablishments, and must keep them -xoing somehow. The petition prepared for presentation to the English Parliament praying- that racing should be allowed to proceed contained many reasons m support. One of these stated that "the ramifications of horsebreeding and racing are very numerous, and your petitioners estimate that at least from £10,000,000 to £12,000,---000 is annually spent m the United Kingdom m connection with this industry and sport respectively, tho great bulk of which finds its way Into the pockets of the wage- earning 1 classes. Military necessity alone would justify bringing- destitution and misery to the thousands "who will be thrown out of- employment as a conseQuence of the prohibition of horse- racing." It was, perhaps, because of this petition that the English Government's first decision has been ralaxed to the extent of permitting race meetings to be held at Newmarket fortnightly. The Government did not make any attempt to interfere with racing m Ireland. Prior to owning Pommern, Mr. Solly Joel, the English and South African mine millionaire, has never owned a classic winner, though brother J. B. had owned several. Solly left no stone unturned to got Pommern fit, and a lew weeks before the big event ho gave 1006 guineas for a horse to work Pommern with. A few weeks prior to the race being run, it looked very much as if Joel would be robbed of the honor of owing a Derby winner, for it was likely that the event would not be run. A Derby winner is, or, rather, -was, until tho war started, worth anything from £20,000 to £30,000 for stud purposes. There is the Inward joy which a man must feel m having himself bred a horse capable of winning the greatest race m tho world. Precisely what this feeling amounts to is crystallised m Lord George Bentlnck's historic groan when ho heard that Surplice, whom he had just sold, had won the Derby. Lord George had sometimes as many as sixty horses m training at one time, while his entiro racing stud numbered over 100. With three stud farms to maintain, plus training and travelling expenses, stakes, and forfeits, it was absolutely necessary to bet heavily and successfully to enable him to make ends meet. And he did bet heavily and successfully. His great coups wero magnificent m, both conception and execution. Ho stood to win £150,000 on his hotfse Gaper for the Derby m ISC3. In spite of all these excitements, he quitted the turf, not without a pang, for the stormy field of party politics. He had not succeeded m winning the Derby, but ho was destined to sell ono amongst his stud who was to win In someone else's name and colors, much to his great personal sorrow. This was Surplice, winner of tho Derby and St. Loger m 18-18. It was a cruel instanco of tho Irony of fate. When he heard that Surplice had won the Derby, he said, sadly, "All my life I have been trying for this, and for what have. 1 sacrificed It?"

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZTR19150821.2.51.5

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NEWS AND NOTES., NZ Truth, Issue 531, 21 August 1915

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3,165

NEWS AND NOTES. NZ Truth, Issue 531, 21 August 1915

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