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RUGBY REPRESENTATIVES

City rPiayejcs^ Cop Positions.

Cotintry Cobbers Ont m the Cold.

flection- Committee— "A. One -Man :?■■•'-■ - -Show/ •■■■ ■ •

NowtJi^^Uvg-coijtain is. about to be trans down for tifie 1913 football season, which has ended somewhat disastJirously for the "Moa," 'inasmuch as' he has been compeHed by; the Kangaroo to ''sky the towel" m their Qnal encounter—a few comnafents anerit the 'mannor m which" the- Rngbyoode lias been conducted may not v be apaiss. Among many onerous . aaxd diffionft duties da- ; yolvlng on . the New Zealand Raghy JDnion, that which loomed largest was | undoubtedly the ijrtoptng to a heacltne Calif ornian tour. Remembering' the many nasty' things said m reference jto the payment of Sa 6d per day to the 'jHQ. Blades during their. aQ-conqnerteg of Great' Britain, axtd to bear out j ■the assertion that Nee? Zealand played tor sport, and sport alone, the oontoolJtog body decided "that the team that' is jgoine toaaalfo, TJrusbd Sam pail his goat-tee m- wo&dermemt, should go forth jwreiy as lil^whtte. amateites, jßertainly a stepiin the right direction. That the Ne^ Zealand team, now frGD. on its way to that partkanar porJlon of America that has no time for jthe little yellow man, is what it is jolaimed to be, "Truth** does not deny. Jm fact, it must concnttulate the officials In that particular respect But pie team is further claimed to be a

thoroughly representative combination. At any rate, such was the opinion expressed by Manager Mason to a press reporter after his team's victory over ( the Australians. Possibly the team may comprise \ THE VERY BEST MEN -the Dominion can . produce — and, It may not Certainly on each occasion "tried out,'' It has inflicted defeat on the contending forces; Thus it gives promise of turning out a formidable side, and 'one. worthy of upholding the honor of the Silver Pern on America's playing fields. ' Giving all that m, "Truth" contends that n6 fair system of selection has been carried out m thisror m past occasions. There is a big army of toebaHera who never. get a "look m" when it comes to selecting representative ■ teams. They are ah unknown quan- j tity, as no attempt is made to bring j the pick of them under ' the selectors' notice through the agency of a series of trial matches. : Such was the procedure adopted by the 3' African tfoion prior- to selecting the Spctogboks for a tour of Great Britain. Thus the best players from sell over the country, to use a now much-abused Massey phrase, got a "square deal." As a result, a body of footballers were banded together that practically , accomplished a performance m each Instance equal , to that established by sNew* Zealand's FAMOUS 1905 BRIGADE. i Comparisons are odious when it comes to note tfife . puny attempts indulged m by thosj^iscacres who control the destinies of New Zealand football. The inter-Island match was the only one m the nature of a trial gome that: eventuated, and it will be remembered Che Southerners "put it all over" their I opponents', and made them appear very poor exponents of. Rugby. Thus It Is logical to conclude that tho South Is-

landers were the better men, and, therefore, should have received prior consideration wiien it came to ..the seieciion of rep. teams. Has this been done? We think not In All Black team No. 1, the South Island is able to claim ten players, while the North can point to thirteen. In No. 2 team, which played against the Australians, at Dune«Kn, on the 13th, the Norfeh was again well- to. the fore with ten out of the fifteen players — a total of 23 as against 15 of the former m the two divisions. As regards the personnel of^-the touring team, with two exceptions, the larger provinces — Auckland, Taranaki, Wellington, Otaso and Canterbury—contribute all the players.- The exceptions are Lynch, of South Canterbury, and Atkinson, 1 of the West Coast. Even m respect to the last-named,' an- attempt was made from some quarters to get him outed, out the endeavors were frustrated. These two are . ' THE SOLE REPRESENTATIVES cf the minor Unions. In point of numbers of those who have been fortunate enough to catch the ' selectors' eyes, Auckland comes first with, more than its share of represents t;ves,^.thus indicating that the Auckland selector; exAll Black captain, Dave Gallagher, must practically "run the show." It will be recollected that after a good deal of agitation, worked up by the press, and later on. by the local Union, Mitcbinson was 'included m tho Californtan. team practically at the | eleventh hour. Whether his inclusion was just or otherwise is open to question. ■-■; He was not among those nqmir hated for a place, while others wliose names were m the' hands of the,selectors were passed over. No doubt Unions who failed to get a player m, when the time comes round, will have something to say about such backdoor methods. Wellington's sole selector has expressed the opinion that to get representatives m New Zealand teams it is necessary to have a say on the selection committee. - As the places on this particular committee are at present filled by individuals who look after the interests of Auckland, Taranaki, Canterbury and Otago, it wllj be readily seen that the smaller Unions have no voice whatever, and are, therefore, left out m the cold. Against such treatment Buller and West Coast protested, and as a consequence of their daring their claims for recognition WERE PROMPTLY IGNORED, even when it came to choosing the second New. Zealand fifteen. . Have the selectors forgotten the existence of a' player named Clem Green? He used to be well known m these carets In big' football. It may be called to mind, he was declared by popular vote to bu. the best back on the field the day Wellington accounted for the Anglo-Welsh team. It may be news to them to learn he is still playmg as well as ever, and we have little doubt that it he had been with his old club, Petone, his claim for a position m the All P.lacks would have been second to none. As it is, he happens to be attached to- a,» minor Union, and consequently is passed over, as isalso ■ his playing associates— Bligh, French and Nolan — three splendid cx r . ponents of the game fit to take their place m any team. The first -named was a member of the New Zealand! contingent that visited. Australia, m. 1910. He has displayoV. great form this season, and in/ a match against a strong Canterbury fifteen recently scored two tries for .his side, and won them the game.- Fre^h, who also lock part, was mentioned >-as the best forward on the ground, and tb.us added to the reputation he gained on the re-, pent tour of the Maoris m Australia. It can be readily understood that it is impossible to include m the teams every player nominated, but it is the manner of selection that exception must be taken to. There, should be more/ trial games held, so that country players could get an opportunity of showing if they are as good as the next man. Foiwlhat reason the scheme inaugurated last season ofTOURING COUNTRY COMBINATIONS should, m our opinion, have been continued. There was no reason for knotktag It on the huad because it was not a finttncialKutieesH at the first attempt. It was not intended to be a money-making affair, but one to givo less favorably situated players a chance to bring out ttie best that was m them. If eou/tlry Unions are alive to their own interests, they. should fight to re-wstabMsh the schemi*, and arrange to share" the profits or losses In proportion to the phiyers representing them. No rnoro glaring instance of how country players have been overlooked is required than m the cases of Wrigley and O'Leary. What chances did they get when playfh« for Walrarapa? But how they have got on In the football world slnco is now nnelttnt history. To go further, we Venture to say that had Downing, who is likely to prove one. of the host m tho All Blacks' vuntyuard, remained In Hawkers Bay, und hot removed to Auckland, ho would not now be well on tho Journey for America. If the New Zealand Union wunns and expect* ttie game over whkii It holdx sway to flourish and retain iv hold on ..players' and puhllc alike, it certainly - must change its policy or <me>-KklednosK, and treat mnaller alllliatod Unions with the conaldfration they descrvo, otherwise Jt Is only to be exwotiHl that tho spread of rival Karaeswll! jmivc mom formidable rivals m the rtVar future.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

RUGBY REPRESENTATIVES, NZ Truth, Issue 431, 27 September 1913

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1,447

RUGBY REPRESENTATIVES NZ Truth, Issue 431, 27 September 1913

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