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ELECTION ECHOES.

Is Bill Massey " a hope," or " a hopeless?" ; . ■.■■■' "' ' ■'• '' ■ ''• ' : IS * « The man who couldn't taka his defeat like a man was Garge Fowlds. .•'••■•'• .■■•",•'"'"■ i Wanted: A manor woman who sympathised with Jock Findlay. ■i. ". '. .'.'■ ■••*'■ • *•'>■- i»■ ••'.'-■-. .The Jim Jeffries of the . 1911 elections was Jock McLacnlari. He couldn't come., back. ..... on * n Latest indications are that "Dahn'/; Fisher will next, turn Laborite. He'll" be definite yet. .... ... . ] While nobody regretted' Jock Find- 'i lay's defeat, everybody expressed sympathy for A. W. Hogg. ->.-,. Now that " th c " ' numbers are vp ,-■ " Truth " wishes to remark that Par- j nell was not a "safe" seat. .What does Lawry think anyhow?. Popular .. Mayor Davis,; of. Ashburton, will stand against 1 - all- comers m the Liberal .interest at. the .next Parlia- : mentary election. This will put Nosworthy's nose out of joint. „..: , . .-. '..- ••-. -.*,*■■-* '.-,.-... W. J. Dickie who -won- the Selwyn seat for the Liberal Party, by defeating Hardy, the senior Opposition Whip, is a native of Cobden, Greymouth. He was born October 10, 1869. Buxtbn, M.P. for Geraldine, takes. an interest m things. He. made all the arrangements at Temuka to show the results on the night of the second ballot. Some members have their uses. Some of the Mastertoh newspapers, . according to A. W- Hogg,- are " scurrilous and reptile rags," "the gutter ■press,"' and- "authors of abominable lies." How respectable "Truth" is feeling. . # ♦ :* ■.■-■•••■ Exit the Knight! Sir John George Findlay closed his political career on Monday at noon, when "he handed m his resignation, as a member of the Esxecutive and Attorney-General, and Minister of Justice! . A. W. Hogg's daughter delivered addresses m the Bush dstricts of the Masterton electorate on her father's behalf The "Deform" victory over a sick man isn't wonderful. Unlike Jim Jeff., W. Hogg will " come back." . *' ' ' * ■'.*' After defeating Jennings for Taumarunui, C. K. Wilson declared:— "I have been riding ..for six weeks up. to, ; my neck . 4 n mud, 'and have addressed 60 meetings, and. never enjoyed myself so .much before ill my life." He can have it on his own. '-■'; After the: declaration of the poll at Itfasterton,: A; W. Hogg announced his intention -, of starting' another newspaper m Masterton, to teach " the present sc.umlous rags " what is what. Masterton ; should .brighten up now, even if; ; it is " dryV' ...' ■• ■■■■ \ Labor man Veitph at .W;ang-anui, is reported ',t6.. have declared that he would vptie to turn. Mas|ey out as well as Ward. . '" Had David McLaren said the same thing m. Wellington East he would have' been, assured . of his sis " Jim" a ; week. •"■■ . : • ; , ■■ .-. •■ ■■•■ .• . . ' .." ■ " ■ -■■' ,In the moment J of victory, David •Buick, 1 M.P. for Palnierston North, forgot the vanquished, r but made it good on the night of the second ballot. Better late than never. .Probably on -the first night David couldn't realise that he had triumphed over Bobby. ~ The .Waikato , ••'lndependent" gives some idea Of the strenupusness of the strugrsrle in JParnell.' ,', A Cambridge resihent, who was : on the Parnell roll, received '■ a reply-paid ' telegram asking him to go up to Auckland and vote for Findlay. . .The message added that his train expenses', would, be paid. The CambrMge resident went to Auckland. ■■'■..."■.■•'. " .- an k> i» ' The personal element entered, on a large scale m the election. Deformer Murray, who contested Grey Lynn,, was handed a letter after the declaration of the poll,' and if is said that it was with difficulty he refrained from breaking down. The letter is now m the hands of the police. No doubt, it. will remain on their hands. If it doesn/t sdmethihg might hang on somebody's conscience. - ; . Great credit is due to the several Returning Officers m the Wellington electorates, 1 viz., Messrs A. H. H6lmes (Wellington North), G. &■. Hodgkins -(Wellington Central), P. Cording ( Welling-ton East) , J. E. F. Perry (Wellington South), and J. W. Salmon. (Wellington Suburbs and Country District) , for the admirable manner m which they conducted, their respective ■ polls, for the expedition with which the figures were made ..■ ■ known, and, last but not least, for .the fact that -the ° &c ™> 1 recount confirmed m each caso the results first discovered. * *"...■*.. " Bill Massey was vilifled'at Wanga.nui, and the local " Chroniqie " tooK up his cudgels and wired him at Auckland:—" Scandalous rumor circulated, here by a man who says he was present at Auckland Thursday • night last that you almost too intoxicated to address electors. Please reply ,-r-Editor "Chronicle." In reply Mr. Massey wired:— "l need hardly say that statement referred to is an unciualified falsehood. Kindly supply me with name and address of individual responsible tnerefor.— W. F. Massey." Now, if it had been said that Bill was intoxicated with success and was too full jto speak, it. wouldn't have been so | bad. . ..■•.• Thus an Otago paper:— "A peculiar 'thing m connection with Prohibition I m Dunedin was the consistency with which the Prohibitionists threw over i their best man politically. That was exemplified last week when they turned down Mr. J. F. Arnold, a bare ma- j 'jority man, and joined Mr. s Latham, j a three- fifth's supporter. At the j same time they were crying Bedford and Prohibition as if the two were, identical. There is not much sincerity m such methods, and .this was no isolated case. The .same occurrence took place m Mr. Bedford's case when ?,)r. Barclay beat.him, and also to Mr. A. S. Adams when he opposed Mr? j Millar." ' " ,

PARAGRAPHS PERTAINING TO" THE POLLS.

• The Prohibition party who con- I ducted, the campaign m _ Auckland I against the Jiqjior traffic, advertised themselves as the "Wowscv ' Company, Limited (fully paid up) ! " Now it's m liquidaton. *' Hawkins, erstwhile Independent Liberal and Pr.ohib. phanatic, who formerly represented Pahi-itua, and tried to catch the Liberal and Conservative V|Ote at the election, but secured neither, is described by the "Woodville Examiner" as "a spent force, politically," j . - . ....-•■ I-I. M. Campbell, newlyreleot for Hawke's Bay, conies of Australian parentage, his father, the late Hugh Campbell, having come across and settled at Poukawa, where the new member was born m 1875. ■ Until his father's death he assisted his' father*'on his run. after which he started -business on his own. account. He has hitherto refrained from taking an active part m politics, a.n<i has yet to, win his political \ spurs. In. the sporting arena, he is wellknown as a inemberr o£ the Hawke's Bay A. and P- Association and of the Hawke's Bay Jockey Club, 1 so he may be put -down as an antiWowser. ; .;'-;■" • ■ "■..- 'i Tho, Government and Opposition candidate* jjad a close contest 1 at the second ballot for the Waitalci seat, which, falling to the lq't of F. H. Smith, has become, an Opposition gain. This gentleman.,' who is a well-known breeder of Merinos as well, as a recognised judge of jtheni, has several times been a candidate for Parliament. Twice he contested the Tiimaru seat with 'W. HallJanes, and, last , ©lection, he entered the' field late against Sir William Steward, who defeated '■■hi jit m .tho end by only 329 votes. F. H. (Smith is itu'the prime of life, being 43 years of age, is a married j man (with no family) , and has spent all his life on tha land,' his homestead being "Waratah," Albury, Waitaki. ,Qf local bodies, he has serye-3 on the 'Timaru High . School Board, and he has always been known las an uncompromising suprporter of the Opposition party m Parliament. ...-'■*'. ' .: * -a ■ , . The return of R. F. Bollard as Opposition. memaber for Raglan, causes the unusual , circumstance to arise ,of ■ father and son being m the House .at .-/Mi©-' same time, this gentleman being a son of old J ohn Bollard, for' many years past M.P. for Eden.' R. F. Bollard was born at "West Tamaki, and is 47 years of aitfe. After some yeiara on hdsl father's farm, he qualified for Local Government clerkships, and eventually went into .'business as asawHJjiller at Taup&rL Tw^o yeyairs ago, however, he settled down to fanning at Tamahere m the Waikato district. He has hjad considerable experience on local bodies, : having been a member of the Waikato County Council, the Waikato Hospital Board", the Waikato . Central A. and P. Association, and the .Waikato Racing amcl Hunt ■'.'..Clubs, .and-, has i held "various offices m connection with the Anglican Church !in the Auckland diocese. ' An active, energetic, and >public- \ spirited man is the'frest description of J. H. Escott, who battled hard and successfully to defeat R. B. Ross and secure tho . Pahiatua seat for the Reform Party. "Hem at Qi'epuki. Southland, he caiiie at an -early a>^e to the North Island, going first to Woodville, then to Napier, and fir nally - back to Woodville, where he engaged m sheep-farming, and has remained there ever since. He was one of the original members of the Second Rifle Volunteer Company formed .at Woodville, and was a member of tlie secoml New Zealand contingent which went to South Africa. Quite recently, after a, prior ' defeat five years previously, he was elected to the Woodville CountyCouncil, and secured the highest number of =' votes ever polled m that county: Pahiatua's elect is held m high esteem by the farming community on account of the great interest he ha 9 always taken m farming and agrarian matters. '*"- ' . a m tx The result of the Maori, elections on Tuesday last has been the disappearance of the mountainous Henare Kaibau, whose chief characteristic was ' his aversion to taking his seat m the House." Last session he did not put 'm an appearance) at all, and the; previous session he appeared on only two occasions. ..At any rate, Kaihau is now numbered among the has-beens, and Maui Pomare, a 35-year-old M.D. of Chicago University, U.S.A., takes his place as ■ Western Maori representative. For Southern Maori, the retiring Tame Parata, for 26 years j m e miber, has been replaced by • .his son Taare Parata. one ; of the most enthusiastic bowls players •m Wellington, where he carries on business as a house and land ■ agent. The Northern Maori representative is unchanged, Dr. Te RangiMroa (Div Buck) being returned by a large mayority. The last-named has always been a staunch, Government supporter ; it is anticipated that Dr. Pomare and Taare Parata will swell . the ranks of the Maseeyites. The polling at the Maori elections was unusually light, the total votes not amounting to 10,000 (although a few more arc to com© m at tho time ol writing which may jDOSSi'bly bring them up to that number) . . Of -course, the return of a member unopposed for Eastern Maori (Hon.. A. T. Ngatai) will account for "this m a measure, but, even so, the polling is far below that cf former years. The recent (at present) m- j complete returns were : — Northern I | Maori 2396, Southern Maovi SO9, ) Western Maori 5540, total 9045. Of j a Maori population amounting to j 47,731 persons at the census 0f1906, j 16,476 voted at the general ejection '! i held (for the Maori seats) on De-'-i I cember 2, 1908, an increase of 431 !bn the number who voted at the ; election of 1905. In 1593 the "voters 'numbered ' 11,269, or 1739 persons fewer than m 3596, when 1-3,008 ; Maoris recorded their votea. while ;at the general election hoUl m Dc--1 cember, 1899, the number of Maoris who voted was 13,t>2S, m 1002 it was 14.271, and m 1005 the mimbr.r who voted was 10,045. i

Canterbury is .still the democratic stronghold, and was the only province I to , stick convincingly to the Government. .- ' ■' ' '.-:'■■' j • ..«•■■' » ■ ' V ! ■■.■ f -.■■■, I There lias been talk of Jimmy Millar taking action against several I newspapers which have, attacked i him. '

The return of Witty for Riccarton was a foregone conclusion. With mammoth sheep runs .encircling and preventing- the expansion of the city conservatism of the squatter brand is dead m Christchurch.

New members will be: — W. J. Dickie (Selwyn), T.- W. Rhodes (Thames), both returned on the first ballot^ and It. MoCallum. (Wairau) returned on. the second ballot, all Government supporters ; J. H. Bradney (Auckland West) , B. P. Lee : (bamaru), C. E.;'iStatham (Dune din Central), J. A. Young (Waikato), G. * Hunter (Waipawa),! "C. K. Wilson (Taumarunui) , u all . returned bn the first, ballof;; A. Harris (Waitemata), R. Bollard 5 (Raglan); H. M. ' Campbell (Hawke's, BJay), G.; R. Sykes (Master.tdn)j v J.;H:-;;Esc'ott\(Paiiiatua)j Dr. A. K. Newniari (Welltogton East); and W. H. D. Bell (Wellington Suburbs andCountry ' District), returned on the second-ballot, all Opposition 'supporters; . T. Payne (Grey Lynn.), J. Robertson (Otaki), W. A. "Veitch (Wanganui), and A. H. Hiridmarsh (Wellington South), returned on the second ballot, Labor ' members r and J. S. Dickson (Parnell); H. Atmore, and R. J. G. Coates (Kaipara), returned on the second ballot,' Independents. Of the socalled "new "members,, two have been members of' former Parliament; namely; G. Hunter and Dr.; A. X; Newman! '/: .; '■■•.■■••'-„. ■ .. *' '; .V. ■'...■■ :: .. i On election eye Dr. Thacker addressed ' a big crowd m Latjmer Square and then retired to ■ his residence opposite.. Amongst the vociferously ' cheering and occasionally hooting populace was a contingent of College students, which sang lxistily' anil inT unison, an apparently much -practised ditty to the" triuniph- , ant hymn music of " Hold the Fort." C oncluding lines * s ounded something like this.:— When the people's votes are counted On . Election Day Dr. Thacker-,.wins: by thousands.: , Hip, MPi hip, Hooray J. The Docv appeared and re-appeared, 'and hoarsely thanked iiis friends for the ovation, but they still remained, and m a sudden burst of inspiration he finally entreated, "Go down opposite the 'Lyttelton. Times,' boys." "We will ! " they shouted. The "Times" had consistently sneered 'at the doctor's candidature, and the staff p.oled i its head out of about two hundred; . windows when the strange noise arose .from., below, pomctuated .with hoots and. groans. , The doctor was avenged. : • .-.'■■■• ; '. i "■■ '•.'." • : - - --- •. "■■ ■■'"■ '■''•■ \ L. M. Isitt!s second ballot' return for Ghristchurch North was expected. His seven hundred odd majority was, largely due to the precarious position of the Government, and the- rally of democratic voters' who .withheld their sup-* port earlier because they couldn't stand a wowser. Isitt's speeches were confined almost entirely to an •; appeal to save the Government, and the miserable pretence that he is not. a member of the Government Party > should ' be dropped hereafter. .'. . His . urgent assurance that he. was not m favor of I prohibiting sacramental wines won back Catholics; also, he made use of the magnificent prohibition organisation to beat up electors, and polling every possible vpte, wpii handsomely. AVhen it came to a question of- Tory or Wowser-Liberal, with the fate of a partially-democratic Government m the balance, real democrats swallowed their feelings and - voted for the wowser, whose only sin politically is approval cf the Ward Government's gigantic loan. drunk. " As evidence of the enormous interest m the contest it might be stated that the voters polled exceedr ed by 10 those cast at the general election, and the poll (8474) was the heaviest m the. Dominion. ■-.''■■ •■'-.. * ■ , * „ ■ Recent events m Dunedin seem to point out with much distinctness the .: fact, that, wowserisin has received a set-back and this- m its -.greatest, stronghold m the country which knows not Joseph; Consider the candidates who are out, irretrievably , out m the ballots. Jimmy 'Arnold; who had wowser tendencies ; m a pronounced manner, was easily outed by, a young political tyro, C. ID. Statham. And ' thelate James had represented Dunedin for close on 13 years, too .! */■•.» « , 'H. D. Bedford, with the full weight of the No-licenso and Wowser and y.M.C. A. vote behind him was outr ecl l with great slaughter toy the- Hon. . J. A. -Millar, who is one ■of the few men who has admitted m the 'Ouse that he enjoyed the pleasures ot life.,. Gee: Hern Thompson, who is the godly representative of North Dunedin, had nothing much to boast about over his victory over R. R. .Douglas. In fact he; had a fairly cioso run when we consKler that it was Douglas's first try at the noble game of politics, that he 5s an Independent with Socialist leanings, and Gee Hem bas been regarded as a fixture m. a seat. Til South - Dunedin, if ... a good str.ong man had come out, T. K. Sidey would also have been politically mimbered with the past. The Local Option figxires m Dunedia are worth' considering. Ji\ the year of grace l9os ' Dim'c'din city, with the assistance of the Wowsei's. ; only wanted a -matter of 500 votes to have the blessings of No-license thrust upon it. Th^s 5-ear's figures ! show that^ no Ip«s + ! hnn 2200 votes . were required to carry it. This, af- ; ter months of strenuous campaign- | 1 ing by wowsers, parsons and paid | organisers of the blatant-mouthed variety. .. ' . * ■'"■'*.. * According to Mr. iC3(!"3 ,4s Gel Adams the figures represent "a great j moral victory." so wo ought to ha ; very tßs"n!iful. "Truth" supposes ! that two "groat moral victories" • would amount tr> a »f.e of j 4WQ votes, ancl f-.v, on, i?io j^reatjr ! the victory the n~u.M votes l^fc-iviroifl. ' Tt will be the onf soMtiiry v-oSfot oy. .wb.-ieli th'o I -icenscd Viet ■-LiallvW^ will i be An entire accord with Mr Adums.

The new electoral boundaries introduced six years ago killed Hornsby politically m the Wairarapa. He has had majorities m the old electorate m "the last two fights, but a big: Junk of squatterdom , near Masterton,, which had been hurled into Wairarapa, lifted the aged Buchanan to tha top of the poll.

Thus a country paper: — " Discovering that a lady elector, whom he was driving to a booth, . was, not going- to ■Vote for the candidate- for -which he was working, a man m a motor cax* down South on election daj r jjtrove miles out into the country and|P2%tely told the lady, after stopping^ -to remova herself. ' When slie' step^WA out, he re-started, and left/her to return as best she could." How like Deform tactics. ■-','■-. .

Davey won rather easily over Dr, . Thacker, receiving- the Labor votes oE Hunter en bloc, or neai'ly so. The doctor swore on election, night that, it: alive, he would guarantee the establishment 'of a third paper m Christchurch within two years. It is. to be called " The Independent." '' Big- undertaking, Doctor, Thacker's next objec - tive is the mayo rait j% •'and;' judging by the reception of his remarlcs. he has a good chance of winning- it. „

As anticipated, the fight between Ricketty Russell and Jimmy ' McCombs for Avon, was fairly : close. "_ . James is more democratic 1 m .politics than Russell, and for 'that^.reasofr the latter got a ' largre"- : '"Goiiser-vatiye • vote, which put him m. - It is just: as well, because McCombs, m addition- to being: a wowser, is a freetrader: and an "enemy or New Zealand industries. The extraordinary, opinion ;of some democrats that it is true economy for the worker to deprive him of his;; job, and give him a cheap article made by a sweated or a cheap nigger . of various tints,' is dying h'afd. -In connection . with the, 21/ cases of alleged dual voting m vChristchurch East, the returning- ■..officer,- attributes it to mistakes made by . poll clerks m marking off the names of", voters. They only average one mistake and a fraction to each polling .booth, which he regards as a very small percentage. This paper doesn't know, but it looks like a confession . or. deplorable negligence and incompetence^ oh the part of the returning officer's .staff. If there were 21 mistakes "made" m Christchurch East, it is reasonable to assume that there were similar bloomers m the other city electorates, and as the recount revealed the fact that 40, votes had been wrongfully 1 credited' to Davey it looks as though the responsible officials require shaking I ': up. ■■'«'•.■ *•■■'.'■■ - r » •■ ■An incredulous grin spread through Canterbury when Auckland 'Herald '* started picking , Bill ." Massey's Cabinet, but loud laughter shook the landscape like. the. Cheviot earthquake when the name of-R. D. Rhodes was given< as successor to iTo.e WarQ, • ■ Postm as';er ; ' General. Local Tory- rags remark, frantically, that Canterbury "-.''doesn't seem to realise the reality of 'the Deform Party's ascendency .to ppwer, and if -it a fact. The Boodle-party's belief that it really has a chance of running New Zealand again ; and isn't temporarily on a level with: the Govern-* ment because the counti;y ; is tired of the latter^s non-progressiveness; is too pathetic for .words, tabor has merely given Bin Massey his coat to hold -while he lights hisjpipe.j-, „.•£ >■•' ' . ■ i*'' ' '■" ' ■•" ■■'^■■."""-■■.■; ■*;••• ;•.•■• •• Exit H. J. Greenslade, -whose energetic little figure: and chirpy face will m future be missing from the Treas^ ury Benches. No more will he celebrate birthdays at- Bellamy's! ■ Wad kato' has turned down ■•• Wardism m favor of Reform or Deform, or whatever Masseyism' is or may. prove to be; it has discarded the- genial journalist, and espoused the. grave gumdigger.. ;Waikato's elect, John Alexander. , Young, is .-' an j Aucklander by birth, and a -dentist by- force,, of.cir-i cumstances. > He Js young .by name as well as m fact, : being very little beyond" the comparatively; immature age of 35 years, but early sigxialised his aptitude for public life by becoming (at the age of 22) a member of the Hamilton Borough Council m ISBT,' retaining his. membership ever since, and having been Mayor. of Hamilton for the past three years. Other local-,.'b6dies have also had. the benefit'. qf\ his. support and experience. Like all men of renpv/n , Mr. Young, M.P., comes of Irish " extractionj hi s f parents emanating 1 from County gligo, aiiii. being among; tha piorieers of Auckland district.' , From the mere fact- that he succeeded m defeating the Prime- Minister's 'fldus. ■Achates, Sir John Findlay, 'Mr. J. S. Dickson, M.P. for Parnell, must'necessarily be an interesting , figures m t% political life of, this country.. He is one of the, best-known men.- m Auckland, having resided for. upwards of aquarter of a century m ' the. Queen City. ' Curiously enougli, for. 'il years !he acted as manager .'for Mr. George Fowids, [whose, exit from active politics synchronises with Mr. Dicksbn's own entrance. ; For the . last four years, however, he has been carrying on the di'apery business on his own. account. He was for eight years a member, and for thi'ee years chairman, of the Remuera _ Road 'Board.; He .is .now ' a member of the Auckland City Council, the Auckland 'Drainage Board, and the Auckland Hospital and' Charitable Aid Board,' an if" takes a "great r interest m sport, being presideiit of the Auckland Rugby League (Northern Union), and vice-president of the Auckland Lacrosse .Association. Mr. ; Diekson's espousal of ex-Captain JKnyvrett is a matter of recent history. t ..; ■ . - * "" ■ \ ~ J. TI: Bradney, who wrested from C. H. Poole, of y.M.C. A. " fame and the 'Murkan twang,- and o.t the same time secured for the Opposition the hitherto Ministerial .seat oi Auckland. West, ' is an' ,-Knglishman by birth, but has -lived since 1359, when he was a youth of teh.lor age, m the Queen City. Ten years after his arrival' with ' his -'parents, having had a schooling of the most elemenUary character, he Mva's" attracted to . tho gplcl rush at Thames* and. eventually became a sawmill hand. ! Later on he became a seaman, ancl i for S ome time vvas 'assistant pilot '• m the Kaip'ara service, aficr which :he was successively employed m a 'sash and door factory, m a. briclcvard; and as a carter and a boatman by the Auckland .Harbor Board. Then . success "m ,life^began to dawn upon him, and he became a steamboat prom'ietor and founded tha ' firm of Bradney and . Binns. In 190~ ■! he .was elected a member of the '• Auckland Harbor Board, .which posi- ; tion he has since retained. Tn iqcio.l ! circles ho is a member of theJY.uckiland Choral Society, the Auckland Liedertafe! (of which he is first tenor),, arid .the Auckland Amateur Opera Club. ,-.'-.._.

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ELECTION ECHOES., NZ Truth, Issue 339, 23 December 1911

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3,945

ELECTION ECHOES. NZ Truth, Issue 339, 23 December 1911

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