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General Gossip.

St. James' men. are fairly confident of (vthcir ability to reach the top of tbc tree when the senior events for the lUJ.O i season are finished. The "Saints" are i getting back Moflitt, who is now m Timaru, and another placer of the South ! Canterbury Capital. Comniit'teeman Peters knocked 'em ' all silly, at the Rugby Union meeting with the intimation that one of the Wednesday players ' had been responsible for nearly 5.0 thick 'uns going out of the accident insurance fund last season. Those Wellington Rugby Union delegates who have the courage of their convictions, and are not afraid of forcefully expressing them, are not infrequently maligned by a mischievous band which , takes all sorts of precious fine care to

keep out of the danger zoue when the other side are making the sparks lly. The "tear-him-to-pieces" brigade is just a.s .much m evidence at the New Zealand Rugby Union meetings, and pursues the same crafty and sneaking policy as the local crowd. Bert Magee paid . a flying visit to the city where they don't produce, walking i freaks of Dave Wilson's calibre, during "the Easter holidays. Bert says Auckland is "alright," but that Wellington is a hundred-fold better. Bert believes that Jack Pagni has serious designs on the blue and white jersey this season. If he can only reproduce his form of, say, thirty years ago, Jack believes that it is a cake-walk for him. What a number of delegates there are who, before the meeting of the Rugby Union, blab so much about their intention to play the very devil with all anrt sundry. When, however, the conclave begins, they skulk off into seclusion like a herd of plague rajs. The saying goes that many of the presidents and vice-presidents of Rugtiy referee bodies are mighty good at pass.pg back a bundle of dead and empty manuscript accepting honors, but quite forgetting to enclose a neat cheque for a guinea or so. Rumored that a local club has snared a couple of top-notchcrs from up North way, and that their services will be available when the championship competitions are under way. Noticeable that Chairman King did not slobber praise and heave bouquets at the ■ Wellington Rugtiy l;nion for its control of the sport, -last year. That omission however, did not upset the feelings of ; delegates m the least. Treasurer Perry made out a capital case when arguing for the selection committee to be appointed by the management committee instead of by delegates as heretofore. Jimmy Lynskey's objections to T>he innovation carried their own refutation. There is a. feeling that the selection committee will be. sutiservie'nt to the managing coHunittee under the new regime, which is not so. The independence of the selectors has not 'been afiected one jot by the new order of things. The writer urges three or four of the present local union managing committee to put on a hustling bustle . this season. Their, "napping periods were painful and J free last year; ' I There was a' ; deadly rush for the Wellington Rugby Union delegateship to the New Zealand Rugby, Union, and the result of the ballot, m Qne particular instance, was mortifying to Brown, "En" Keily, Sullivan, Iting and , v Co. A determined ,eGort was made to block one candidate, who bears the reputation of being a very caustic critic of the show run by George Dixon, "Gaily' 1 and .others, but the plot completely failed. Delegates showed their complete contempt for such despicable tactics, and it is. about time they were dropped altogether, '• after the lesson of the past two meetings. " ' When either "En" Kelly or Stan Brown attempt to explain financial matters to a gathering they flounder about very much m the same . way that a Chinese junk does when struck by a typhoon m the Yellow -Sea. It is not that they are ignorant of their subject, but a lack of fluency of speech and confidence stop them from doing proper justice to it. , Treasurer Perry philanthropically promises a plcntitude of poundage m assisting to make' -the Athletic* Park playing areas fit for . players- to gambol on— in the sweet bye-and-bye. Why doesn/t Jack King induce Speaker Arthur Guiriness to give him a lesson or two on how _to run a meeting? It would be a payable spec. — to delegates as well •• as Jack./ . ■ George Howe brdught down the Rugby Union house last week when he produced some startling curios to be found at the Athletic Park where footballers do most congregate. George's string of trophies were convincing proof that combatants have something more serious to dodge than an opponent's list or boot. It's up to the'. Union's; Executive to see that the caretaker exercises the ■ closest supervision m ridding ,. the turf of the sample of unwelcome visitors that were introduced by the Melrose Club's delegate last week. If some of the delegates at Rugby Union meetings would only use their thinking box more before they asked silly questions, .the proceedings would be much shortened. Two or three of the querists m evidence at' Wednesda y. week's meeting shouldn't have been loose for a moment from their mother's apron strings. Isn't it funny .when, after the rough mouthy handlings a plain-speaking man gets from the squeaking and sneaking sports m their street corners and "tan-ner-in" meanderiags, they scamper off with, the speed of greased lightning, immediately the slandered ene gets his maxim gun trained on them. There was no question about Dannie Weir's facts m regard Soccer v. Rugby at our public schools being 'completely slaughtered when Jimmy Lynskey got to •him. Jimmy 1 knows a bit when it comes to public school items, or he ought to, anyway. By putting up two of its own men for seats on the Wellington Rugby Union Managing Committee, the Oxiental Club representatives committed a grave tactical blunder. Had only one been nominated the chances are he woujd have been elected. As. it was, neither got there. A. E. Wilson is the latest recruit to the local Rugby administration board, and seeing that he has yet to win his spurs, Ido riot propse to criticise his at this, stagq- It is to be hoped that he will be .more- pushful on the committee than he "was m the scrum. Nobody will deny that Stan Brown has been a splendid success m his role oi chief executive officer of the local Rugby Union. life has had a good business training, and that asset has been instrumental !in pulling tlie Union out of more than one hole m which his less experienced colleagues have landed it. Jack King, sometimes dubbed captain, for. what reason I know not, is, m a personal sense, as de.cent a fellow as one will find on a week's tramp. The writer has a very warm regard for friend King, believing, as he does, that his honesty of purpose and integrity are unimpeachable. J3ut as chairman of a Rugby Union gathering Jack is a bit of a joke, aurt delegates at last week's annual korero of the local union, knowing that fact, took full advantage to veer round all parts oL, the compass when on the argument mission. The proceedings were unduly prolonged by -reason' of the loquacity m two or three delegates who should have been pulled" 'up promptly on several occasions for side-tracking from the point at issue. The climax came, when Percy Smith was privileged to reply to his own amendment, and on the chairman's attention being called to this distinctly gross abuse of parliamentary procedure, he (King) pleaded the excuse that the amendment was about to be incorporated m a motion which had been moved by Stan Brown. Members of Rugby Union executives arc very much m the same position as players who work themselves into the Australian cricket team. It takes a devil lof a lot of trouble to get them there, 'but once the trick is done, they take a mighty heap of shifting. The Wellington .and New Zealand Rugby Union management committee are strong cases' m point. The Metropolitan Rugby Union of Now South Wales has given the beauteous .Swannell a £50 rise m screw, which now .stands at £250. A proposal to rescind tfiis has been put forward, but the influence of "Swanny's" friends will probably lead to its rejection. Football is a costly sport m Melbourne, and '' South, !> who garnered m tiic V.F.A. premiership last year, spent some quids m order to purchase players perfect enough to do the deed. The ex- j penses for] trainers, embrocatiou, and j such like, cost £2432 lGs sd, and for this amount they collected honor— just honor and laurel leaves, as "Gaily," of lily-.' white renown, would say. Wonderful, ain't it, what money will buy, and what it is asked to buy m sport, real sport, mind you. Wellington Rugby Union's season of

bladder kicking m 1909 was a fairly profitable one, but Stan Brown's crowd' of dollar delvers were not satisfied with losing some £85 over injured players, and at the annual meeting last week they persuaded delegates to raise the subscriptions of the already over-taxed clubs m order to meet any further deficiency on the accident insurance funds. , 'The revenue producing ideas of Brown, j Perry and Co.- served to show the task' one has to brush away the cobwebs that keep many of our Ragky legislators bound down to -the £;s.d. plank. They do so need a prog^d get a move out of them, and compel them to march with the times. , All their anxiety seems to lie m tha direction of harvesting a crop of dollars. t Over' Sydney way the representatives, of various Druid Lodges (country and town) and tramway staffs have resolved to run football competitions under the Northern Union code. At the * Dsuids' gathering E. R. Larkin, secretary of the Rugby League, made some remarks by invitation. A similar courtes*- had been extended to B. Swannell, secretary of the N<S.W. ]>letropolitan Rugby Union, but. he deemed discretion the better part of valor by not putting m an appearance. They say m Auckland that the best thing a union can do when it seeks affiliation with the New Zealand Rugby Union is to enlist the services of Micky Sheehan as advocate. The South Auckland Rugby Union can give a testimonial on this head. Crawford, one of the Stanford University Rugby forwards who has been selected as a member of the American team to visit the , colonies, weighs 15st, and is credited with being an even time pedestrian. . ./■ • It is stated that one of the foremost New Zealand representative Rugby forwards of last season purposes taking up his residence m Inyercargill within a few days and will probably thow m his lot with the Star F.C. Seeling's first appearance m the league team was auspicious, the Wigan team, for which he played, defeating Merthyr by 67 points to 'nil, a record for the sea--1 son. The stalwart New Zealander was ever m the thick of the fray, though the best feature of his work was undoubtedly the manner, m which he controlled the ball, both by hand and foot. Merthyr possessed neithqr the speed nor the weight to cope with their antagonists, and the Welshmen must have rejoiced exceedingly when the whistle sounded for ' cessation. „ ^- : -. v

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZTR19100402.2.13.2

Bibliographic details

General Gossip., NZ Truth, Issue 249, 2 April 1910

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1,887

General Gossip. NZ Truth, Issue 249, 2 April 1910

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