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NEW CALEDONIA.

We are in receipt of the Monileur of New Caledonia, from the 21st August tojhe, 25th ultimo. We extract the following! for th'e perusal of our readers : — The war steamer Fulton, commanded by Lieut, de Vaisseau Lover (which left the/Port de France on the 22nd of August, to fetch the aboriginal chiefs to be present at the Emperor's fete day), returned on the evening of the' l3th of the same month, after having touched, among other place?, at the Loyalty Islands, and at Art, one of Ihe Lebert Archipelago. Twentyfive chiefs of the north-east coast, with a suite of fifty-three natives, landed at the chief town of the settlement on the 14th. Those of the district of Kanala arrived there, at the same time, by land, after four days' inarch. .Their countrymen from the Isle of Dines and from Oven Island, also repaired to the same spot in their canoes, while those from the S.E. coa&t' traversed the stony plateaux of the south. , In all, they amounted to forty-five chiefs, in place of the twenty- five who presented themselves last year, and this was brought about (says the Moniteur) by the energetic and paternal influence of the Colonial Government. No one was wanting of old and new friends, except indeed, to their great regret, three sick chiefs, who nevertheless were desirous of being represented. They all passed several days at the Port de France. Every evening .the Governor patiently entertained a given number of them— we say patiently, for it was necessary to employ many intervening means in order to make the interested parties understand his ideas, his advice, and his suggestions. It seems that two of the chiefs some time ago, banished to Tahiti and restored to their native island by a policy as intelligent as generous— fulfilled id these conferences the very useful function of interpreters, which they were enabled to discharge from tha fact of their having (during their exile) acquired a little French and Tahitian. Bourate, chief *of the important tribe of Hienguene, and Toura (also called Oando),' chief of the north-east portion of the island, j »nd of the country which forms the right bank j of the Diahot, were more than all the rest attentive to the words their liberator, and , happy to show their thank fulness towards him. I Addressed in French they only partially com* i prehended what was said, but it was made perfectly intelligible to them when repeated in Tahitian. Afterwards they translated what was said to them, as required, into the dialects of Torino, Hienquene, Puebo, Ara'ma, Bonde, and even of Koumac. We have also (says the Moniteur) the pleasure of stating that our pupil interpreters have already beeri able to give their assistance at these conferences." The Moniteur' from which the above is taken —that published on the 21st August— gl*e« a variety of other details incidental to the fete on the 15th of August ; the fact of a hundred and fitty native labourer! being d*d in 1 a peculiar 'ancy costume, the picturesque appearance of the native school children; add other par- \ ticulars. THe account alto makes the' following men* tiori of the Loyalty Island chief Boula, describ- [ ed a« " one ot the great chiefs of Lifod." ••Boula also — one of the great chiefs of Lifou, the tribes of which were erigaged scarcely two months back in a triost serious contest with orjr soldiers, in which persons on both Bides suffered — Boula also became some* what fearful, and resigned to the accomplishment of a duty rather than influenced by the attraction's of •fet* (for the Governor thought that* the most effectual means of fjorribatitjg the' absurd things which had beeri told to the people of the Loyalty Islet against the French would be to Uring them arriorigst us.) Boula, too, we repeat, completely reassured by the reception given him, and entering into the sport of, the occasion, took part in a rice." The" ac» count goes on to state that in this race the poor Ldyrtlty Wander was successful, arid became the proud winner of " « superb -orangecoloiired umbrella," which was supposed to be destined for the dse of Nassave, the wife of the Chief. At the Loyalty Islands the Napoleonic Festival was observed with great eclat. A military mass was celebrated in the open air, ih the place where the new camp is situated. The altar was decked out with boughs and flowers, and several native children 1 , dressed In white and red garments, were id attendance, carrying bright-coloured banners. Games folltiwed the celebration of divine service, with fireworks and the felon pilot (apparently a sort of Melanesian corroborree) irt the evening. The Moniteur' considers that the affair has made the soldiers extremely popular at Lifou. M. J. Gamier, the engineer of mines at New Caledonia, has sent in a special geological report relative to the 1 north-east Bddit of New Caledonia.

Emigration *o New Ze aland. — On Saturday, the 10th Sept., the favorite ship Heltnslee, 791 tons, Capt, Brown, smiled fora the Tail of ihe Bank tor Auckland, New Zealand, having on board 262 statute adult passengers, besides her crew, in till about 360 touts. The sailing of this passenger ship was attended with more than ordinary interest, frota the fact Of her having been chartered specially by the local Government of Auckland,' through their a^ent in Glasgow, Archibald Clark, E»q., for | the conveyance of assisted emigrants to Auckland* In the year 1563 the Legislature of New Zealand voted a considerable »bm of money fo r jhe p rpo*e of twitting mechanics, labourer*,

<he colony of New Zealand, wheie a grant of I And, besides a town allotment of one ten -acre suburban section, will be given to tbe emigrant upon his arrival. Suclv'an inducement to in* emigrants was quickly taken advantage of, and hundreds of applicants came speedily forward. THe emigrants on Saturday or board the Helenslee showed how judiciously the aelec' tion had been undertaken. A more suitable body of intending colonists could not be desired. The passengers were all assembled on the quarter-deck of the Helenslee, on Saturday, when the inspecting medical officer of the port — Dr. Frazer — and Captain M'Kenzie, Government emigration officer, went on board and carefully inspected each passenger and tlie accommodation provided for them during the voyage. These gentlemen expressed theraielvs remarkably well satisfied with the healthy appearance of the emigrants and the liberal prd. vision made for them by the owners of the ship, Messrs. Patrick Henderson & Co. After the inspection, a number of friends interested in the movement and several of the officials on board tbe ship sit down to an excellent dinner in the saloon of the vetset, tbe chair being occupied by James Henderson Es«J., oiie of the. owners. The toast proposed i>y the chairman; "a successful voyage to the ship ftelenslee, and good health and happiness tp her Captain, officers 1 , passengesr, and erew f " was drank with' approbation. The chairman stated that tbe Captain had been vested with unlimited power to mak,e tbe emigrants as comfortable as posti-' ble. The Helenslee weighed anchor shortly after three Vclock, and proceeded .direct to tet in tow of' thesteam-tug Commodore.-— Glasgow Herald, Seat. 12. ' ,

The Almrtcand SETMtt«N*i.-^Mr;, John" Brame — a Brother of the late Mr. Brame, founder of the Albert land settlements— -and who has been identified with the movement for some time past, left London on the 31»t August, id the Victory, with a Urge party of the members of the Albertlsnd association. They are mostly of the better class of emigrants, skilled ip v*« rious trades which are heeded in trie colony. Not a few of these emigrants hare signified their intention of settling at once on the laud; while others have preferred t« accept "general country" land orders, so as not to interfere with the healthy development of the settle* merits. It is the expressed intentipn of others to enter tHe labour market of Auckland! and; if possible, obtain their land aa contiguous 6s may be to -the Albenlf nd district; so that in coarse of time they may occupy land which will thai become identified with the present special settlements. This plan will prevent the absorption of the valuable lands by a class of nonresidents—a practice which is greatly to be reprehended. Thus ttie special settlement lands; will be kept in the hands of ttie emigrant capitalis s, who will at once settle on their laudi and by developing their resource*, enhance' the value of, if not actually absorb the surrounding, or intermediate general country lands. In the course of time the poorer immigrant will have realized the reward of his industry, and he, too, will become a) "settler," and .commence to realize what has been his ruling ambition— the possession of a few acres of soil. The development of these settlements; whether conducted under "special" or 'general" operations, is m most desirable matter, arid too milch importance" cannot be attached to this system of colonisation. This scheme, though all has not been accomplished that was hoped for, has tindohbtedly deraoristr&ted the advantages of special settle* ments. There can be no doubt thit in process] of tide the most sanguine expectations of the projectors will be realised. The association under whose auspices this settlement has beed formed have entered into a correspondence , with the Provincial Council of Nelson, with a view to an extension of their ideas. We understand that the majority of those who have recently gone to Auckland, as well as those now no their way, are emigrating in consequence of the invitations theyhave received fromtheir friends already settled there. This is only a fulfilment of the prediction we made at the time of the decease of the late founder of the Albertlantl settlement, that the time would soon come whed justice would be done to bis name, and when all he had anticipated of this grand idea would be realised. It has been determined to secure before long some listing memorial of the founder of Albertlhndj so that hi* name may evfer be associated with the places whose propertty he hits ridt been permitted to tee.-— New Zea» land Examiner.

American and Pacific Cotton.— -A nam* ber of Californians have engaged in planting cotton in Siniloa and Sonora. Mex'co. Seven toni of seed have been distributed among the natives. It is stated that 3,000 acre* bare been planted north of the Fuerte River. The San LBreHzo Agricultural Company planted 1,600 acres to the north of Mazatlan. The company have tent to Maasach lsetti for a mill: There are two mills runfting-^orie often loom! at Maiatlan, and another at Presidio. It is estimated that the yield will be 5001b. to the acre ; and the company hate the whole Sad Lorenzo River at their control. At the Sand* wich Islaiidi several ihousabd acres have been" planted, add engihes, gins/ and pressea, are ready for- work. In Central America then ia great excitement on cotton, and the people ire waking .dp lo an energy. they defer knew before. Agricultural instruments of American roariufacture, which had heretofore been re-* pudi&ted, ire now extensively imported ; 65Cl bales of cottdn were St San 3bt6 lately waiting ship^nerit, and two, foreign vessels had on board 8,000 quintals. The island of Tahiti is td ba added to the catalogue of lands which are now producing cotton. The ezperimenl in iti growth has been eminently successful- there* The new line of steamera about to commence running between New Zealind nnd Panama will carry this crop to its Atlantic shipment, from whence it will principally go to Europe. Many of the South Sea falinds, as favourably situate as Tahiti; will also engage ia the cultivation; rind lessen existing cotton rates. They are now occupied by cannibals and ta'vages: A late Panama steamer brought 2.000 bales of Pacific cotton, of which 1,100 were shipped to New York. — Pitiibura Commercial.

A Nsfr Dmchption or Ship. — The first tiial of an entirely new species of steamship has been successfully made on the Thames. It* peculiarity consists id an arrangement by which the. whole vessel is divided into a ntimber of *epa>ate pieces, one of which consists of the machinery and berth?, while the remainder are available for cargo or other pdrposee. The firs£ constructed will consist of ten separate pot-* tions, one containing the engines and berths' far the crevfj and driving three similar portions adapted for cargo. These Will be loaded with* coals at Newcastle, the whole steamed to Loridon; where three empty portions will be waiting to be returned to' the noYth for fresh cargo. The part containing the engine will he disconnected from thc'firpt three; and attached to ihe fecond; with which it wil) teturn to find the thirdaai

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZSCSG18641130.2.15

Bibliographic details

New Zealand Spectator and Cooks Strait Guardian, New Zealand Spectator and Cook's Strait Guardian, Volume XIX, Issue 2017, 30 November 1864

Word Count
2,122

NEW CALEDONIA. New Zealand Spectator and Cook's Strait Guardian, Volume XIX, Issue 2017, 30 November 1864

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