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THE GREAT PRIZE OF PARIS. (From The Times, June 7.)

The race for the Great Prize of Paris bids fair lo rival the Derby in interest, and especially if it be remembered thst the interest of a Derbyday is not confined to the exploits of thp course. As yet the great French race is in its infancy. It was run last year for the fmt time, but althoush it is still of tender sge — ilthou^h many Englsh men and women who rejoice in the spectacle of our Epsom gsmes have never even heard of it, the institution has at once asserted its preeminence, and has come to be regarded as one of the chief attractions of the racing year. How could it be otherwiso, considering the pslendour of the prize and the charms of the racecourse? There is no such prize tffered on any known field. What tbe winner of the Derby carries off it not in the strict %ense a priz-- ; it is a sweepstakes. A certain sum of money is subscribed by the owaer of every horse entered for the race, and to that sum there is nothing added. In the great French race the winner carries off not only the stakes which have been mhscribed for 126 horses (which, by the way, ii about half the number of entries for the Derby), but aho a work of art offerer! by the Emperor, and £4.000, in money offered by the city of Paris and five railway companies. The contention for this magnificent priza takes place on the finest course in the world, within easy distance of the moot pleasant of all cities. Suppose a beautiful racecourse, arranged with the rare skill that Frenchmen show in administration, surrounded with fine scenery, honored as Ascot is by tbe presence of the Court, and situated, as it were, in Holland-Pork, not far from the heart of JLondon — what could be more perfect ? If the French bavo envied ns tbe enthusiasm of the Derby-day, they may now boast that they have established near their metropolis an equestrian festival which, as far 38 the mere framework goes, worthily rivals our own. It says something for the great race that there were no lets than 126 entries for it ; but surely it is disappointing that o( these only five ran. Of the original entries by far the greater number were of English horses ; of the few that ran only one belonged to •n EoglUh stable. If English horses were scarce, English visitors were plenty, and seemed to ,have the most business on their bands all about the course. Especially upon them devolved (he business of cheering the Emperor and Empress. They crowded e-bout the box in which Nnpoleon 111. stood conspicuous, and cheered him in a manner from which the Fiench themielres held aloof. When the ladies in lovely toilettes heard a commotion in the neighbourhood of the Imperial box, and turned to their lords for an explanation of the excitement to which they began to feel attracted, these lords ■ urned round with impertubible coolness to explain that it was only those fool sh Anglais who were making a noise about the Emperor. Noise or no noise, they crowded uhoui his box, and gazed with English pertinacity on the Imperial pair. With some of the English, indeed, the sight of the Emperor seemed to eclipse that of ■he race. One English dime we heard quarrelling with her spouse because, in order to see the Emperor, he would not throw away the chancei of a good place from which he could see tbe grand contest of the day. Although the m'ce for the Great Prize of Paris is so important, the manner of the festival in honor of it and the acresiories have no resemblance to those of the Derby. Some Englishmen may be disposed to think tint all the drunen orgies of Eptom are lets to be reprehended than tbe Sabbath-breaking at (he Bois de Boulogne; and we have therefore a word or two to say as to the day selected by our French friends for their greatest racing event. That the English should disapprove the selection of such a day, and that the leading authorities on their turf should remonstrate with those of tbo French turf, is most natural. Tbe CouutDdro, as head of tbe society which presides at Longrhamps, wrote last year to Admiral Rons a long letter to explain how Sunday came to be selected for the race, and how no other dty would suit. The fact is that (he Parisian does not as yet care enough about the finest race to sacnfice bis business fur it, and it is only upon the doy of rest that he can be coaxed 'n:o giving to tbe sport tbe patronage of his presence. Anyone who went to the Bois de Boulogne on Sa'urday last might convince himself of this. On a lovely day, withiu an eacy walk of Paris, there wn some very pretty racing, the Emperor being there fo see it. His subjects who came to see it with him were amazingly few. Such a sight so near to London would draw out half its population; they would not miss it for the world. The .socttty which has got up the races gives itself a fine name, which in this connection is not without significance. ' We have our Jockey Club to msiiiute races, a society of gentlemen who, no doubt, Ho much good to our breed of horses, but whose first and professed object is to enjoy the spott. Our neighbours have their " Socidte d? Encouragement pour T Amelioration dcs Races de Cheuaux en France; " they place in their most characteristic manner on the forefront of their title to pul>l:c suppirt tbe theoretic or the practical object which horse-racing mny be supposed to subserve, They announce themselves not as providers of pleasure, but as patriots eeeking the welfare of their country, and they are doubtless sincere in this profession. Also, when the city of Paris and the railway companies give tbeir support to the socipiy with the leng name, nnd offer fa prize of £4,000 for a single. t»cp, the ob-

ihrei" minutpi r.f superb excitement oner a jenr' bat to lead them t! oroughly to interest thcrnRplves in a fjrent national event. If pleasure were the chief o' v j netn ct of their search, tbes vc ciigbl expect (he society to yield to oar view* and choice the day. When pleasure is offered to ihe people nnd ihcy refuse it, th<>y have only thera3"lves to hlsme. Bot, seeing that the main object of the Society is to compel the French to interest themselves in horses, they are justified in forgetting us entirely and in adapting thrtr .arrangements to the convenience of the greatest number of their own Countrymen. Crowds of Englishmen will go to the race whatever be the day selected, and English horses will run. ' The grand peculiarity of the raco to an Englishman, however, arises out of its vieioity to Parj% It is just beyond the Bois de Boulogne, on ihe old duelling ground of Longcbftrrjtjp, with St. Cloud a Jittle further to the South. We miss here the fine smooth turf of our English P)wn», and find ourselvc's on ordinary grass .Jaad ; but the view is lovely, and all the arrangements of t'.e coarse arc perfect. Belted {with trees, tha coarse, with oil its gentle undulations, can be soen from the enclosure in every part, except where for nbont five seconds in the longer race* a clump of trees bideo the view. The distanceo, too, are so arranged that the spectators have the pleasure of witnessing in most cases the start as well os the finish. The race begins but a few yards to the right of the enclosure, goes past the Stand, then describes a circle groatcr or lesser, or of middle size, and finally goes pist tb« Stand, •gain to the post. Everybody can see the wholo with" ease ;no pushing, no straining Yio iu«hing, «bont. Then there is nothing like the excite--rnent of Luncheon "on the hill* at Epsom. If anybody wishes for refreshment, there are icr, lemonade, claret, and every kind of pdlisserie provided for French tastes, and great fleets of tumblers containing sherries and grog?, with pilea of sandwiches, for what are supposed to be the tforrect tasets'of Englishmen and Anglomaniacs. But the orgies of luncheon are beyond the dasires of a people who breakfast between 11 and 12, who can walk it they choose from their homes to the rnce-courge, and walk back again with little fatigue. The preseuce of the Couri added to the brilliancy and the stately qutet of the scene. Never on any race-con rse have we seen snch wonderful decorum. As a small proof of jt we venture to H state an incredible fact. I 3 it possible to believe that the everlasting and inevitable dog was not to be found on the race course at Longcharops ? That necessary attendant of our races, where he flies with frantic terror along the courie, amid the yells cf an admiring populace, — wss utterly extinguished and put out of sight by the civil power. It is a very old saying of a very old Frenchman that we in England take our pleasure sadly. Bat on one who has been accustomed to the uproarious jollity of a Derby-day, and to heir all the cbtff ibat fliea on the road to Epiom, the idea begins to dawn that even our French neighbours can be stiff, stajd, and even triste in their pleasures. On the road to Longcbamps the nearest approach to a joke which we saw was one which was not inteuded. A.I along the way men were engaged in watering the roads with force pumps, a kind of enormous squirt attached to piping that runs upon wheels. All a/ong the road men were exercising these heavy squirts in every direction for tho purpose of allaying the dnst, and it was only by great attention and skill that' they could avoid covering the passengers with spray." Suddenly a splendid equipage mightbe seen in iho Bois de Boulogne, throwing all else into thfl shade, the ladies whom it contained in the gayest dresses, the coachman beautifully powdered, the horses with high action, sleek and glittering. Nothing in the whole order of ihe universe conld be more correct, more stately, more exalted above the accidents and iofrmities of mundane existence. Behold, as we are admiring at a humble distance this faultiest equipage, Jacques Boobqmme directs right upon the coachmau'. left eat his enormous squirt, nearly knocks him i.ff his box, and covers with unkindly spray i\x2 fair denizens of the carnage. Well, we do not complain. Life is full of compromises and compensations. If in the Paris races we miss the jollity of a Derby-day, and sigh, for some tittle outbreak 0/ humour, tfe re perhops paiJ for our loss by the comfort of the 'journey, its calmness, its easiness, its ladylike decorum. The recent struggle for the D;rby> which ended in the victory of Blair Athol, detracted to some extent from the interest of the French racp. There wore few persons who did not believe that the Derby winner's superiority over all colts of ihe same age was firmly established, and if ha really were the horse which be seemed to be, then there could be little doubi as to the issoe of the French race, provided it were fairly run. No great hopes were entertained of his chief antagonist, who had, nevertheless, proved herself ihe best filly of her year, and, indeed, the running of this animal, and not only of her but also of other horses helonging to the Comte de Lagrange, as Hospodar, Suadella, and Jirnicoion, had provoked so much criticism that many who expected to see Fille de lAir beaten were rnuoh helped to that thought by their wishes. The performances of this mare have been, to sty the least of if, unsatisfactory. She had duriDg the spring lost the Two Thousand Guineas, for which she was first favorite, aod she also lost the corresponding race in France. Yet immediately afterwards she won the French o>>ks, or, as they call it, the Prize of Diana, with ridiculous ease,, and bat a few days baik she won our own Oaks without any trouble. On the occasion of (he lastnamed victory our neighbours across iho Channel were puzzled to understand what could be the meaning of the demonstration agtinst the winner, and the question was aske/, — " la this the result of the Commercial Treaty, that these English cannot brook (he success of a French horse?" Our continental friends have since then been enlightened, and now we believe that, in spite of tbe stupidities of some of the Paris papers, which harp on the rerenge of Waterloo achieved by Fille de lAir, and vaiuly imagine ibat tbe English can be jealous of a horse bred from English, parents, simply because it has fed on French corn and is owned by a French subject, they begin to understand that the anger of the English mob was directed, not aga : nst the success of a French horse, bnt against the faccess of ft barse whose previous performances had been most unaccountable. Tbe only othsr competitor who was supposed to have something of a chance wss Bois Ruussei, the winner of the French Derby, in honour of whom Mademoiselle liabelle, tbe well-known flower girl at all the French races, wore tha colours of M.Delamarre. Bois Roussel is 1 heavy-looking horse, from whom, dl. hough it was supposed that he can stay well, not much was expected ; and still les* did hiu stable companion and half brother, Vermour, * excite grelt expectations. Vermout iris known indeed as the winner of, the Prix de Printsmj a* — a race run on precisely tho same course as that of the great race oi Sunday last, but that was bis only^ known public performance, iwi it ' was net regar<ledj|ns sufficient to establish hit

\ i M«be3 bit character that his owner, M. Deltmarre, apparently did not expect to win upon iira, but pat him into the rice tp force the runring and mike ■ speed tbit ultimately would till io favor of Bois Ronsse! when it would be ;,. Time enough, for the latter to go forward and v",. •'Sunday mi a magnificent day for the race, although to warm that it added to the hardness of the ground. All Faria went out to s«eit and made a splendid show, although we mutt add that as regards the number of individuals and of < quipages aveo Aicot, which is 25 miles from l^ndon, far outvies Longchsmps. A great concourse of people assembled of all grades, in shich what was most conspicuous were the lovely dresses with the exquisitely chosen colour* of the i'Veneb dames. Surely in no out-of-door spectacle in the world could such a show present itself. That part'of the ground immediately before tbe C>rand Stand which at Epsom is allotted' to tbe l.ttingmen is at Longcbamps made a promen de for tbe ladies, and there they sit in cbairs ft^ht in front of tbe racecourse, while tbe benches •ef tbs stand range down to the ground. The t'rgbt was very gay and pretty, and especally in the neighbourhood of tbe Imperial box, but all round the coarse bright crowds in light dresses assembled to giza npon tbe contest, which, more particularly since tbe reception of Fille de lAir received at Epsom, has come to be regarded with patriotic interest. Grest was the excitement u» to the iasue of the event when it was heard that Blair Afbol bad bean detained at Follcstone, and bad arrived only Jht night before. Frenchmen, wben thsy hesrd of his detention, began to brighten up, and told each ptber confidentially that the horse would not appear at all. Englishmen, too, began to lose confidence in him, and it was not until his arrival was reported that his position in public favor waa recovered. Then, and especially wben be was said to have -cantered well on tbe racecourse, he rose in the betting, till tbe odds of 2 to 1 were ventured on - him. fa tbe same, and, indeed, much greater proportion, Fille da lAir declined in public favour, ao that when the time for tbe race came 3 lo i waa offered against her and ao one would take it. When she appeared or. the course, however, she was greatly cheered, not became those wbotheeri'd bad any distinct knowledge of her capabilities, but because their patriot zeal led them to wish success to the' French mare. Oo her back alone tbe honour of France was sup* posed to rest, and it' waa for her to vindicate France agaiust perfidious Albion represented by Blair Atbclt Less -notice was taken of Bois Bouisel and Vermont, and few indeed of those who saw the rtce could tell the difference between tbe two horses. Tbe former is a dark bay borse with one white fetlock; the latter is a bright bay, with three white legs. Bois Bonssell is a stiff, sturdy, large made horse; Vermout is light, airy, and of more striking actiou When galloping. His style of going, indeed, war so conspicuous that after his preliminary csnisr ho enlisted many supporters who had previously not even recognised bis existence. As for Baronello, the only other horse that ran, be tnigbtily pleased tfce ladies, but he was not fated to bring Bny greater success to the bouse of Rothschild than Breeze or Tomato obtained at Epsom. " Tbe borses got off at the first start, Vtrruout leading, and Blair Athol biding his time behi.id. That Vermont ahould lead waa precisely what the public expected. They regarded Bois Rouisel as tbe better horse,* and supposed that it was tbe business of Vermout to make the running for his stable companion. .Tbe conclusion which was drawn from the position of the borses as they passed the stand was that if either of M. Delaraarre's borses was to win it would certtioly be the hindmost. As they want round the first turn by tbe mil), Vormoat still held the foremost place, but whereas hitherto Bois Roussel had fallowed next, B«ronello being third, tbe Ust of these now for a time took the second place, Bois Itoussel dropt into the third place, while Fille de i'Air remained as from tbe start, fourth, and RUir Athol lait. Very much in tliia order the r-.ee continued np the gently undalating distance which may bewailed a hill, and th» only point which need be particularly specified is tb»t Baronello aoon gave way, and lost all chance of corning trgain into tbe racs. At the top of the bill the pice, which had before been indifferent, improved, p<>d Fille de l'Air. rushed to the front, she and Y-ermout coming on by themselves down tbe hill, nt the bottom of which Blair A' hoi joined them. Here, for a second or two tbe anticipations wbicb unlearned men woold have formed from tbe betting teemed about to be realized ; inasmuch as the two favourites appeared to be going faster than Vermont, who was, nevertheless, still leading. The en o'ion excited by this advance was - only transitory, as Fille de I'Air waa almost instantaneously disposed of, and Ghalloner's pursuit of tbe leader was, in less time tban we take to mention tba fact, diicoveied to be futile. Nothing daunted, however, he continued bis efforts to the half distance, when perfidious Albion was fain to acknowledge herielf beaten, and Vermont,' who continued without faltering the same magnificent action which bad characterized bis running throughout, won easily at the last by two lengths. Whether the extra three futlongs over and ebove the Derby Course did or did not prove fatal to Blair Athol's chance, we do not here at-" tempt to decide; but tbe facts remain tkatat ihe Deriy distance be looked ds like a winner as anything- could well be, and that when that distance vtaa overpassed he waa prac;icilly disposed Of. It may be supposed that tbe result of the great race prodaced astouisbing excitement. The crowd rushed to the judge's chair to bear the name of tbe winner, but being too excited in tbe belief that it was Bois Roussel, had no ears for anything but their own responding shout*. Tbey shouted, waved their hats, turned to the Emperor, and cheered him and Vermont in the name of France. Tbe crush at this point' was tremendous, tbe roir of tbe huzzas rent the air, and tbe Emperor bowed in acknowledgment of the glory of victpry. M C'c3ttnagnifique ! e^Bimagnifiqvte /'* were tbe only words beard on French lips ior tbe rest of the day. Ladies and gentlemen, as tbey owoited each' other, all said without exception, "Cesl magnifiquc /" Not content witb cheer inp, •clipping Their hands, and crying " magnifique" they hissed Blair Atbol, and Challoner wbo rode him, with a right good will. There was a perfect atorm of hisses, tbe meaning of which could not be mistaken. It wan, of course, a bitter explosion of r«ge against England, which in the moment of victory might well have beer) spared, even if there was jcrrt cause for ;t. \s*e have •f plained, however, that tbe exciting-cause of thii demonstration was based in error. Englishmen bave no hostile feeling to FreDcb horses. Tbe Sporting Gazette'of last Saturday made with admiiable point a quotation from Juvennlj which bearidirectiy on this question :—: — » " Lautlamus equua, fodli cvi plurima palmn *' Fervet, et exsultat rauco victoria circo ; •'Tfobilis Lie, qaoemque vemt de gramme, cujus. ""CUra fuga ante, alios et p?miu& m asquore pulvis." "VYhatroaaers It to us on what grasfr or hay tbe

mentioned in tbe rtry aeit line, and who contrive by innumerable arts to lurronDd and turn to doubtful vies tbe noble tnimsf, that we bare to dread ; and it it because tbe owner of Fille de I'Air, orv lome one io bis employment, inourred tht suipicion of being, it may be without koow« ing it, connected with tucb a herd, that the English resentment against tbe mcceis of tbe French mare was aroused. If Englishmen have bad a feeling against Fille deJ'Air they bate no feeling whatever against juch a horsa as Vermont, whose success on Sunday last may be accepted as thoroughly deserved, since no better test of a horse's powers can be devised than that it should make all the running in a race, and from start to finish should never once be outpaced. Fille de I'Air was so unfortunate as not even to obtain * place in the judge's list. She passed tbe chair third, but her jockey neglected to weigh afterwards, and consequently was, by racing law, distanced, so that the honour and profit of third place were given to Bois Roussel.

Errors of the Press. — I have been referred to > tolume of populir lermons, in which, owing to the negligence of the proof-reader*, a deplorable number of typographical errori appeared. One of theie, ta if in reference to the others, was aingularly appropriate to the unhappy eircnmitances of the poor author; the verae, "Princes have persecuted me without a came," reading, "Printeis have peraecuted me without a cause." Campbell'a celebrated Essay on Miracles appeared in one of the advertisements as Campbells Essay on Mangles." In newspaper articles of my own I have had the misfortune to see "the internal relations of the Chord)" converted into "the infernal relations of the Chnrcb," and people who "spoke the Gaelic language" were made to "smoke" it. I remember a great public demonstration that took place in a town in which I was residing at the time. After one or tv»o unimportant speeches a certain demagogue arose whose appearance was the signal for loud and enthusiastic cheering from the multitude, A party newspaper describing this, in the conrse of its grttulatory and fervid repoit, aaid that the vast concourse had "rent the air with their snouts." — Once a Week.

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THE GREAT PRIZE OF PARIS. (From The Times, June 7.), New Zealand Spectator and Cook's Strait Guardian, Volume XIX, Issue 1993, 7 September 1864

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THE GREAT PRIZE OF PARIS. (From The Times, June 7.) New Zealand Spectator and Cook's Strait Guardian, Volume XIX, Issue 1993, 7 September 1864

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