Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

NEW ZEALAND SPECTATOR AND Cook's Strait Guardian. S aturday, August 13, 1853.

This week has been one of unusual excitementjfroni the elections under the new Constitution which have taken place in the different districts of members to serve in the Provincial Council. As the meetings connected with these elections have created great interest in the minds of the electors, we have endeavoured, as far as we could, to give faithful and detailed repoits of them, as records of the proceedings connected with the introduction of Representative Institutions. Having today completed our report of the meetingon the sth inst, we hope on Wednesday to give a report of the proceedings on the nomination day of the candidates for Wellington, and those of the nomination day at the Hutt. This record of the professions and opinions of the respective candidates will not he without its value tothe electors, they will be able to compare their promises with their performance, tojudge of their professions by their practice, and see at the end of each session how far the expectations that have been? formed have been .realised, how far the promises that have been so freely given have been fulfilled. The management of the affairs of each Province has been committed to its inhabitants, on themselves in a great measure then will depend their own prosperity, each Province has as it were started in a race, and in proportion as a sound discretion has. been exercised by the electors in the choice of fit men to represent them in the Council, so will the result be seen in the improved condition, in the rapid advancement of the Province. It will be seen whether those who have been so loud in denouncing abuses, who have been so earnest in promising improvements, will reach the high standard of duty they have proposed for the imitation of others, whether they will even equal the j>erformance of it by those whom it has been their constant practice to decry.' A fair trial awaits them, a few months will declare the result. We will not however pursue this question further on the present occasion, we will just add a few words by way of explanation of our remarks on the coalition, more particularly as they apply to one of that body against whom they were personally directed. In our remarks on Saturday with reference to Mr. Clifford, we wished to shew as strongly as we could the violence of the leaders of the coalition, and the inconsistency of attempting to reconcile two opposite courses. The great struggle, it was well understood, was between the advocates of the pledge and those who were opposed to it. Some of the leaders of the coalition declared they would rather lose their election than take the pledge, — that the pledge was unmanly, unconstitutional, un-English- It had also been asserted by them, that a nominee was unfit to sit in the Council ; that they would rather lose their election than that a nominee should be returned ; that the struggle was between the old liberal party and the nominee interest. We conceived, therefore, that we were justified in assuming that those who had joined the coalition " had made a joint stock of their principles, and had united in one common profession and line of conduct;" that it was impossible to serve two masters — to support the pledge and to make common cause with the opponents of it. Seeing, then, that Mr. Clifford was prominently put forward as one of the coalition, looking to the violent conduct of some of the leaders of that party, and that Mr. Clifford at the meeting on Friday " confessed he was a party man and gloried in it," we took this to be a virtual retractation of his pledge, even though he afterwards repeated the pledge in the course of his speech, and that he had in effect identified, himself with the coalition - party. -We .have,, every, .desire tb : join in 'the wish expressed- on' both, sides to forget past disputes, ancl if t?q

liave done Mr. Clifford an injustice in this Assumption we are fere sorry for it, and readily admit that in naming- him We selected one of the most moderate nien of the coalition. As some difference of opinion exists on this subject We must leave the public to whether, unable to reconcile two such opposite courses, we were right xm these * grounds in believing that by joining the coalition Mr. Clifford virtually retracted his promise.

Address to the Governor from the Hutt Settlers. — Upwards of two hundred settlers mustered outside of the long Room at the Aglionby Arms, at the Hutt, on Saturday, the 6thinst, at four o'clock in. the afternoon, to receive his Excellency the Governor. Shortly after that hour his Excellency arrived, and was received with three hearty cheers ; he then proceeded into the room, which had been tastefully ornamented with fern leaves and flowers, and having taken his seat, Mr. Renall presented the following address, which was passed at a ■public meeting at the Hutt, on the 25th July — To his Excellency Sir George Grky, K.C.B. Governor of the Islands of New Zealand, and Commander-in-Chlef of the same. &c.

Mat it Please Your Excellency. — We the undersigned inhabitants of the Hutt district, having learnt that your Excellency is about to leave this country for England on leave of absence, cannot allow you to depart from these shores without tendering you our warmest thanks for the uniform attention you have shown to the local interests of this district.. When we consider the condition you found us in upon your arrival in this Province, and contrast it with our present quiet and prosperity, we cannot but remember that the change is due to the measures you adopted, nor omit to record the acknowledgments that are so justly due to yourself from the inhabitants of this valley. Wishing Lady Grey and yourself all health, happiness and prosperity, we subscribe ourselves, &c. (Here follow. 169 signatures.) • River Hutt, July 25th, 1853. <-

His Excellency then read the following reply. Government House, Wellington, August 6, 1853. Gentlemen, — When in the year 1546 I arrived in this portion of New Zealand, the inhabitants of the Valley of the Hutt formed a Militia, which rendered the most essential services during the war, and to which I -was greatly indebted for its fortunate termination. When peace succeeded to war, the same people set an example of industry, and developed the resources of the colony in a manner which has much contributed to its prosperity. When subsequently warm and generous political support was of great consequence to me, the inhabitants of the Valley of the Hutt again came forward, and in the most generous and disinterested manner afforded me the warmest support and aid in favour of the measures I was adopting. Now that I am about to quit this portion of New Zeala.id, at least for a very considerable period of time, the inhabitants of the Valley of Ihe Hutt again come forward ■with the warmest thanks for my labours in their behalf, and with their good wishes for my future happiness and prosperity. For each and all of the acts I have thus enumerated, I tender you my paning thanks. Lady Grey begs me also to return her thanks for the kind manner in which you have mentioned her, and we both assure you, that we shall never cease to remember the inhabitants of a District with whom my interests have been for so long a time bound up, and from whom during 1 so many years, and under such trying circumstances I have received such valuable assistance and expressions of regard. G. Grey. To A. Ludlarn, Esq., and others who signed the Address, Upon its conclusion, the settlers gave Sir George nine cheers and three cheers for Lady Grey. Mr. Renall then said that the settlers were extremely desirous of shaking hands with his Excellency previous to his departure, upon which the settlers passed the chair, each shaking hands with the Governor as he passed in the warmest manner, while on every side were heard exclamations of " God bless you Sir George," "We hope you'll come back to us," " Sorry to lose you," &c. The meeting was a most gratifying exhibition of the warm and sincere regard ''which the settlers of the Hutt bear to his Excellency', of their strong appreciation of his private worth and of the great adrantages.their district and the, colony at large have derived from his wise and prudent administration of the Government.

The Admiral Grenfell arrived last night from England ; she is reported to have made the passage in ninety days, and to have been fourteen days of that time off the land. We liave not room for further particulars.

Dubino the last ten days the Po-irua tribes and some .of the tribes in the Middle Island have, been in Wellington to discuss the terms, and make arrangements for the sale of the whole of their claims to that portion of the Middle Island they had not previously ceded to the Government. The result is that they have now disposed of the whole of the west coast of the Middle Island, as well as the different bays and harbours at Cloudy Bay, Queen Charlotte's Sound and the Pelorus, except DTJrville's Island, and such reserves as may be necessary for themselves, for a consideration of Five Thousand Pounds. Of this sum a first instalment of £2000 has been paid to the Natives on the 10th instant ; the remaining sum of £3000 is to be paid in six annual" instalments of £500 each. Reserves of two hundred acres each are also' to be given Jt&^ some of the principal chiefs, amounting altogether to a few thousand acres, to be selected from the land thus; cedted; these reserves will be ponfifm.ed 'to then? as their personal property by a Crown Grant, (l in the same way as a settler receives a title to iris land. |

We mention this fact as a proof of their advancement in civilization, and as showing the clear notions the Natives have on this subject, and their distinct apprehension of the difference hetween their general claims as native owners of these districts, their title to which has heen extinguished by this purchase, and the right of individual property in land conferred by a title from the Grown. It is said that when the arrangement was proposed to them by the Governor, they exclaimed with one voice "Excellent, Sir George," and willingly consented that the payment in money should be reduced in proportion to the sum above mentioned. By this arrangement the Natives have ceded altogether about a quarter of the Middle Island extending along its West Coast, including besides some of the best harbours in the Island, and some valua- ( ble mineral districts. The implicit confidence j reposed in the Governor by the Natives has induced them at the last moment to come forwa- d and relinquish these districts which they have hitherto refused to part with on any consideration, in order that the general settlement of their claims might take place before His Excellency's departure from the Colony. The completion of these important arrangements has delayed for.a few days Sir George's projected departure, but it is reported he will leave Wellington for Wairarapa in the early part of next week. This acquisition will prove of very great value to the Provinces of Nelson and Canterbury in which these districts are included, particularly the former Province, while the" extinguishment of these Native claims by the Governor removes many serious difficulties and obstacles to the progress of these Provinces that might have otherwise have arisen, as well as prevented the increased expence that would have attended their purchase if it had been put off to some future day.

Yesterday the nomination of candidates to represent the Hutt district in the Provincial Council took place at the hustings erected near the Hutt bridge. As we intend to publish a full account of the proceedings on Wednesday our present notice must necessarily be very brief. There was a very numerous attendance of electors, and the proceedings on their part was conducted in a very good humoured and creditable manner. , Seven candidates were proposed. For Mr/Wakefield, Mr. Ludlarn, Mr. Hart, and Mr. Eenall a host of hands were held up, for Capt. Daniell, Mr. Mason, and Mr. Sellar the show of hands was very small. A poll was demanded by Capt. Daniell, and the poking will commence this day at nine o'clock.

The election of Superintendent for the Province of New Plymouth took place on the 1 6th ult. There were three candidates in the field, Mr. Charles Brown, Mr. Halse and Mr. Wicksteed. During the early part of the day Mr. Wicksteed resigned, and this seems to have operated greatly in Mr. Brown's favour, who was returned by a majority of 35 votes, the numbers at the close of the poll being as follows'; — Brown '. . 173 Halse 138 Wicksteed 12 The Taranaki Herald states the total number of voters in the Province to be 353, so that only 30 of the whole constituency neglected to poll.

Br the last arrivals from Lyttelton we have received a file of the Lyttelton Times to 6th August. The election of Superintendent has heen decided in favor of Mr. Fitzgerald. It seems that through the mismanagement of the Returning Officer at Akaroa, the name of Colonel Camphell was wrongfully erased from the Electoral Roll, and this will, it is said, form the ground of further proceedings. Captain Simeon, the principal Returning Officer, appears to have acted on the day of nomination in a very unfair and partial manner, for while professing his desire that " everything should he carried on in a spirit of impartiality and fair play," he allowed Colonel Campbell to he nominated, he at the same time declared that in the event of his being at the head of the poll he could not return him as Superintendent, and " impressed upon the electors ! that as far as the proceedings went in the province, all votes for Colonel Campbell would be thrown away." This seems to have acted very prejudicially to Colonel Campbell in the Christehurch District, where the declaration was made, and to have lost him his election At the close of the proceedings on the 20th ult. the day of election, the following was declared to be the state of the poll. Fitzgerald 135 Campbell 94 Tancred 89 Colonel Campbell has protested against the election, and declared his intention to petition against it.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZSCSG18530813.2.4

Bibliographic details

NEW ZEALAND SPECTATOR AND Cook's Strait Guardian. Saturday, August 13, 1853., New Zealand Spectator and Cook's Strait Guardian, Volume IX, Issue 838, 13 August 1853

Word Count
2,435

NEW ZEALAND SPECTATOR AND Cook's Strait Guardian. Saturday, August 13, 1853. New Zealand Spectator and Cook's Strait Guardian, Volume IX, Issue 838, 13 August 1853

Working