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ENGLISH EXTRACTS.

It was stated on tbe authority of an Edinburgh paper, that the Queen would leave Balmoral and arrive in Edinburgh on Monday next. It it no,w reported that Tuesday is to be the.dty. Instead of coming straight on to town, the Queen, on leaving Edinburgh, will go through Chester to Bangor, where she will sleep on Wednesday night, tbe whole of the Fenryhn Arms being engaged for her Majesty and attendants. The object in going to Bangor is to see tbe famous Tubular Bridge over the Menai Straits. From Bangor, her Majesty will return to Sahney junction near Chester, and thence to Shrewsbury. Although the Princess Victoria visited tbe Salopian capital, no Sovereign has passed through the town of Shrewsbury since James the Second visited it in 1687* From Chester tbe Queen proceeds to Birmingham ; and thencs to Windsor by the new broad-gauge Birmingham and Oxford line, so unpropitiously opened last week. Great preparations have been made along the route for receiving, the Queen with demonstrations of loyalty and respect. A letter from Strasburg of the 24th states that whilst the waters of the Rhine and tbe 111 are falling gradually, other disasters are announced. The water which entered by the breach made near Artzenheim, in the Haut-Rhin, has established a fresh current in front of Rhinau*. The losses caused by this last flood are enormous. There have been eight houses swept away at Richtolsheim, 12 at Saasenheim, 25 at Rhinau, 12 at BeeUzheim, and 10 alt Obenheim. There are several other buildings so seriously damaged that it will become necessary to repair them before (bey can bt inhabited. Tbe returns of the

losses sustained at Artolsheim Schoenau, Diebolsheim, and Friesenbeim had not been received at Strasburg, but it is known that the inhabitants of Oberheim have suffered enormously, having been for a long time exposed to the fury of the torrent rushing in from the breach made iv the embankment at Rbinau. Three tons of snuff hare been seized by a Customhouse officer on board the Baron Osy t a steamer from Antwerp, on her arrival at Nicholson's Wharf. The snuff was concealed in tins purporting to contain rape-oil ; but there was merely a tube full of oil connected with the moulh of each vessel. Jamaica is reported as being in a deplorable state ; disease was thinning the scanty labouring population, and emigration ships were carrying off thje planters. Two brigs had arrived, one at Kingston an 1 the other at Falmouth, to carry off proprietors, planters, and persons engaged in agriculture. Earthquakes had been felt at Kingston. The jewellery, plate, and furniture at Apsley house, is valued at £500,000. The mansion was purchased by the duke, subject to the ground rent which is £800 yearly. A meeting was held at Castries, in Santa Lucia, on the 14th of August, on the old subject of West Indian distress ; and petitions to the Queen and the two Houses of Parliament were adopted, praying for some modification of the legislative acts of 1845 and 1848 regulating the duties on sugar imported into the United Kingdom, and for such other relief as the present extreme distress of the inhabitants of this colony j call for. A deputation was appointed to back up these views. Dr. Paget, the writer on Hungary, has been for some time living in Dresden, the Napoleonmade kindom of Saxony. Suddenly, on the 2d September, his house was entered by the police ; and his letters, notes, manuscripts, and many books, were carried off. Mr. Forbes, our Minister at Dresden, at once called on the Minister for Foreign Affairs ; but neither he nor the Minister of the Interior knew anything of the matter, — at least so they declared. Of course the question arose, instantly, if the authorities were ignorant, who instigated the police ? And it has been asked whether Austria had anything to do with the burglarious transaction ; especially when a kingdom is in a state of tutelage ? Last week the towns on the course of the Rhine and the rivers flowing into laki Leman were inundated by the great rising of the waters. At Strasbourg, the river rose upwards of twelve feet above the high- water-mark ; and a battalion of troops was employed to prevent or diminish the mischief. Between' Lausanne and Berne the roads were overflowed, broken up, and rendered nearly impa«ablej and iv the lower quarter of Lausanne the waters row one foot higher than they did in the destructive inundation of 1831. Yverdun was reported as •* an isle in the midit of a lake ;" and at Basle the Gazette could not be printed. Other places suffered in like manner. A telegraphic despatch from Strasbourg, dated Tuesday morning, states that the whole plain, extending from the Rhine to the military road, Was an immense lake, and that many houses had b*en swept away by the flood. The inhabitants, however, bad been saved. The Duchess of Orleans suffered an accident on Sunday, while travelling from- Lausanne to Berne. In consequence of the inundations, the coachman overturned the carriage into a ditch full of water ; the collar bone of the Duchess was broken ; the children escaped unhurt. Mr. John Stokoe, a surgeon, died suddenly at York, while on his way home to Durham from Harrowgate. Mr. Stokoe was one of the medical attendants appointed by the British Government t» attend Louis Napoleon at St. Helena. He possessed many presents given him by the Emperor. In the statistical section of the British AssoI ciation, the Rev. Dr. Morgan read a paper on the moral and economical condition of the lower classes in Ireland, and referred particularly to the " exodus "of the people. He offered some severe strictures on the conduct* of the Romish priests, when Archbishop Whately interrupted him with the good-natured remark, " I am afraid Doctor, you are getting out of Exodus into Leviticus 1" The incident occasioned some merriment in the section. Etna continued in eruption up to the 30th of August. The lava flowed in broad streams varying in depth from 9 to 15 feet, and extending and contracting in width according to the nature of the ground, dividing into smaller streams and reuniting on the lower side of the obstacle. Much damage had been done to vines and for* ests. The little commune of Zafferana was threatened by the coming fire-floods, which gradually were nearing it ; and all the inhabitants had fled. A magnificent view of the newly.formed craters, with their deptbt of boiliog fire, was i commanded from tht Monte Pumiciano. The following letter to the Editor of the Times adds another interesting anecdote to those which have appeared in the English papers in connection with the Duke of Wellington : — " Sir, — Having seen in your widely-circulated paper that the late and ever-to-be-bonoured Duke of Wellington had a French cook at Waterloo, who is reported to have said, " He knew the Duke would return to his dinner," I beg most respectfully to inform you that his Grace bad no French cook during the campaign of Waterloo, but that I cooked his Grace's dinner on that eventful day, as I had done on the days of all bis Grace's great battles from Salamanca, having joined his establishment at Grenada in 1811. I may be permitted to state that I stood in the doorway in the house at the village of Waterloo at half- past 12 p.m., when his Grace rode up after the battle, and on getting off his horse Copenhagen he saw me and said, " Is that you ? Get dinner." Lord Fitzroy lay in the next room with his arm just amputated, and the bed of Col. Gordon was there also, which was taken in to Brussels in the vehicle in which I brought the batterie de cuisine in to Waterloo. Lord Fitzroy Somerset and Mr. Algernon Greville are quite aware of the above circumstances. I should not have troubled you with the above, but Lord Frederick Fitzclarence, with whom I have lived the last four years, says I ought to let the public know that it was an English cook, and not a Frenchman, who cooked his dinner on the glorious day of Waterloo. I am, Sir, Your obedient servant, JAMES THORNTON. 9, Chesham-pUct, Belgrave-squart, Sept. 27."

During the last month sixty-two ships under Government control sailed from Liverpool to Australia, carrying no fewer than 23,280 pase tigers, including 1770 from the euigratiou depot at Birkenhead. The parochial authorities of Liverpool are using exertions to obtain a voluntary rate for the purpose of aiding deserving paupers to emigrate to the Antipodes. They have recently availed themselves of a balance of an old voluntary rate for this purpose. Last week, they succeeded in sending away twenty hearty girls, by the Catherine Mitchell. Before the vessel left the river, ten of them bad beeu engaged as servants by families on board. During a storm at Sutton Valence in Kent, last week, some twenty hoppickers sought refuge in an oast-house ; the lightning struck it, and killed three men and one woman, besides hurting several others. The bodies were but little disfigured. The poor woman was set on fire both at her head and feet; her shoes were completely torn off, and the nails in them partially drawn. One of the men had a steel watch-guard round his neck ; this was completely fused, so that it crumbled on the touch, while on the touch, while of the watch the glass was cut in two and the works and case more of less damaged. Another had his leggings torn off as well as his shoes According to the accounts fro.n the Haut-Rhin, the overflowing of the Rhin and the 111 has cauied terrific disasters in that department. A subscription has been opened throughout Alsace for the sufferers, and the Bas-Rhin has already raised 200,000 francs towards the charitable work. The French journal of Frankfort of the 3rd says that Prince Lucien Bonaparte is still at Hamburg, where he plays at the public gamingtables with varied fortune. After his winning 150,000 florins, on the 30th September, the bank was compelled to close. Mr.Locb, by direction of the Duke of Sutherland, has issued an announcement to the entire tenantry authorizing them to kill all the hares and rabbits on their farms and lots.—Scotsman. Trinidad is reported to be in a satisfactory state. According to a correspondent of the Morning Post, persons desirous of insuring their lives in Tipperary are asked some very unpleasant questions. " A friend of mine went the other day to insure his life in Tipperary; when the following printed form was put into his hands—'Where do you lift ? Are you a landlord ? Did you ever get a threatening notice ? Were you ever fired at? How often ? Have you any reason to apprehend such a thing at preseut V Unless these ques- [ tions be satisfactorily answered upon oath, you can't insure your life." A restaurateur not far from the Boulevards, desirous of encouraging the visits of the English to partake of his various delicacies, has had his bill of fare translated into English. As a proof of the information which his visitors are likely to obtain, one of the articles translated is quoted. The words " Lea cabinets se servent a la carte" is rendered " The withdrawing-rooms are served up after the bill." Two painters who were in partnership at Sunderland have become equally partners in care-fully-devised crime. Bach was married and has children. They have eloped with two women, one of whom was married, and thf painters have plundered a number of persons : they got advances from customers, gold watches and guards on superfine cloth and gold leaf on credit, and one actually got possession of a cottage and raised money on it by mortgage. It is supposed that the whole party have gone to Australia. A young man has died at Clare from the effects of a poison —cantbarides—contained in a lovepotion secretly given him by his sweetheart. The girl fancied he rather slighted her; she consult|ed a wise woman, and received from her the fatal philter to bring back the young man's affection. | The Bhurtpore, a fine ship of 1500 tons, bound ! from Liverpool to New Orleans, with 485 emigrants and a crew of thirty-five men, has been lost on the Long Bank, near Wexford. She struck at night, while the passengers were in bed ; and a frightful scene ensued. But Wezford oyster-boats and other craft took off the people by degrees, and all were saved except fire, who were drowned. The ship subsequently went to pieces. This was only her second voyage. The authorities of Wexford made prompt arrangements for the temporary shelter of the sufferers in the poorhouse. On the same night there was another wreck on the same coast. The Michael, from Liverpool to Constantinople, was driven on the rocks at Carnmore, and speedily became a wreck. The crew were in great danger, but eventually got to land.

Ireland.—The subjoined curious statement appears in the Evening Mail:—" We have heard, from a source which we deem faith-worthy, that 40 men of a regiment quartered in a midland county, having read the account of the murder of the soldier of the 31st by certain— as yet unknown —members of the * Liberal party,' resolved, on deliberation, to quite the church whose teaching led to such a catastrophe. Having formed this resolution, they sent a deputation to their colonel to request that he would alter the registration of their religion from Roman Catholic to Protestant. The gallant officer having ascertained the cause of this resolution, advised them to deliberate more maturely on the subject before they took any final step in the business. To this suggestion they yielded, but after some days informed him that their determination was to join the Protestant church, into which they were received."

Ballooning in Paris.— A tolerable large number of spectators assembled at the Hippodrome yesterday afternoon to witness another experiment in aerial navigation. The aerostatic machine which was to ascend on this occasion is the invention of Mr. Giffard. It is an oblong cylinder, somewhat in the form of a fish, of about 120 feet in length, and about 20 feet in diameter at its thickest part, and gradually tapering off at both ends. The directing apparatus is a very small and beautifully-finished steam eDgine, setting in motion a propeller resembling in form the screw used in steam vessels. This is suspended, at about 20 feet beneath the balloon, from a long boom which it attached to it, and which supports at its extremity a triangular sail. The preliminary preparations having been completed, tnd the steam engine and its platform made fast, the aeronaut took bis seat, the machine rose and went rapidly before the wind towards the ioutbwest. Suddenly, by the action of the apparatus, its course appeared to receive a check, and it

slowly veered round, thus proving some corncommand of the aeronaut over his aerial vessel. It then steadily and gradually proceeded in the direction of the wind until lost in the distance. Without hazarding any positive opinion on the final results of this experiment, it must, we think, be regarded as an improvement on those which have preceded it, and M. Giffard may be so far pronounced to have made a first step in the science of practical aerostation.

Persia.—According to a letter from Constantinople, dated 23rd September, the Shah of Persia has narrowly escaped assassination. While be was hunting near Tehran, on the 15th of August, six "ill-dressed" Persians,belonging to the s?ct of Babi, a religious chief put to death some time since, approached the Shah with petitions. Having presented them, they demanded redress for the insult to their religion. Two seized the bridle of his horse ; and before the attendants, who, according to the Persian custom, were waiting at a distance, came up, two of the assassins fired their pistols. The Shah was slightly wounded in the cheek and thigh, but retained his seat. His servants arrived tt s gallop, cut dcwn two of the assassins, and pursued and captured one. Thrte escaped; but they were afterwards found in a well, and cut to pieces.. Next day, thanks were offered op in the grand Mosque of Tehran for the escape of the Shah, and in the evening the city was illuminated. All the Corps Diplomatique waited on the Shah to congratulate him.

Austria.—To all outward appearance, everything is perfectly quiet in Austria; but information, acquired at trustworthy sources, induces me to believe that such is not the case. A friend who, totally devoid of Italian sympathies, has known Lombardy and its inhabitants from bis early youth, assures me that the hatred of the Italians to the Austrian Government was never so deadly as at the present moment. Another person, who is, perhaps, as capable of giving a correct opinion on the subject at any one in Austria, expressed himself thus —' It, is but natural that Austria should wish to be on good terms with the President, 'as she is well aware that •bould she be iuvolved in a war with France, ber Julian possessions would be lost for ever.' Tbe yoke now weighs infinitely heavier on the necks of the Italians than before the revolution. Up to 1848, tbe greater part of tbe evils complained of by the Austro-Italians were purely imaginary; the laws were rightly observed and duly administered ; Venice, Milan, and other great Lom-bardo-Venetian cities, were prospering. Sines the revolution, the country has been subjected to military law, and to what is more galling, the arbitrary will of tbe several commanders ; heavy fines, in the shape of loans, have been imposed, and trade is languishing. A striking instance of arbitrary rule came to my knowledge but yesterday. It having been observed that some of the lamps in the streets of Brescia were extinguished before daylight, tbe commander of the city—General Susan, I believe, gave notice that if they 'were not kept burning until a certain hour, a severe punishment would be inflicted : shortly after a patrol found three lamps extinguished before dawn; and the city authorities, to save themselves, threw the blame upon the contractor, whose business it was to see that tbe lamps burned a certain number of hours: although it was found, in this man's contract that he was only liable to a fine of 15 lire for each lamp which went out before a specified time, the General mulcted him in 3000 lire : tbe man appealed to the Guber* nium, which decided in bis favour; but the General persisted ; the Gubernium then tendered bis resignation ; it was accepted, and tbe unfortunate contractor learned that might may over* come right. One and the same person lays dowa and enforces the law at Milan, the Director of the Police being also Commander of tbe Gendarmerie. In short, things are so strangely managed in Italy, that no one who is not either an employe or a military man can doubt that this Government is playing Mazzini's game for him.—Times.

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Bibliographic details

ENGLISH EXTRACTS., New Zealand Spectator and Cook's Strait Guardian, Volume IX, Issue 788, 19 February 1853

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3,168

ENGLISH EXTRACTS. New Zealand Spectator and Cook's Strait Guardian, Volume IX, Issue 788, 19 February 1853

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