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DEATH OF LORD GEORGE BENTINCK.

[From Bell's Life in Londdn, September 24. J This melancholy event was as sudden as it is afflicting. The intelligence first reached London by means of the electric telegraph on Friday, and was announced in second editions of the daily papers. It was confirmed by later despatches received at Harcourt House, and conveyed to the Marquis of Tilchfieldjhis eldar brother. The circumstances attending the death of the noble lord are thus narrated : — On Thursday afternoon his lordship : ] having an appointment to dine at Tboresby | Park, the seat of Earl Manvers, and being a good pedestrian, set out on foot from Welbeck Abbey, intending to walk across the fields to Tboresby Park, a distance of five or six miles. A man servant was at the same 11 time despatched with a horse and gig to takethither a change of dress, &c, for his:lordsbip^ Lbrd George did not arrive at the ap-' pointed time, whereupon inquiries were made' of the servant as' to the cause of the delay. ! He replied that before he left Welbeck he saw his lordship crossing the park, and afterwards, as he was driving along the road, he he observed him walking in a field situate about three miles on the road. Time rolled on ; and as his lordship did not arrive, the servant drove back to Welbeck to ascertain whether he'had returned thitfier ; but finding that such was not the case, he again drove back to Thoresby Park, thinking that Lord George might by that time have arrived. Nothing, however, had been seen of him, and consequently several of the servants were despatched in various directions to search for his lordship. His own servant proceeded along ' the footpath to Welbeck, and after walking some distance he saw, on approaching a gate, a human body stretched on the ground. On going close up to the object'he discovered that it was the body of his master,^Lord George "Bentinck. 'Life was 'quite extinct-. Soon 2 afterwards the' body was removed to Welbeck in a drag, and the servant wha fouifd the body was despatched to ' Edinburgh to inform Lord Henry Bentinck, the younger brother of the deceased. The deceased; William George Frederick "Cavendish Bentinck, was boru in February, . 1802, being the second son of the present Duke of- Portland,, who is now in'hisf'Blst year, by Henrietta,' daughter and co-heiress of Major-General" Scott, arid sister, of the Viscountess Canning.*' H-ft was brother to the Marquis of Tit'c^fielo" (heir to the Duke*doin of Portland), 'to Lord Henry Bentinck, M.P. for North Notts, to' Lady Howard <ie Walden, and to Lacfy* Charlotte Denison, the wife of Mr. Evelyn Denison, the WhigM.P. for;Malton. He' hud vne unmarried sifeter,, Xa^y M^ry.' ''*' r ""; - -, ( : - - ; ' J I/ord George completed • His '■ education »tt Christ Church', Oxford,' »fia -aented in tiiS«ar-

liest years in the brigade of Guards, having" retired; from the army with^he rank of major. ' The first, and, indeed; the only bonafide political appointment he ever held, waa th,at - of private secretary to his celebrated kinsman.,, the Right Hon. George Canning, when .that , statesman was Prime Minister.. Canning* -opinion of Lord George was very high. To use his own words, "If George Bentinck c would apply himself to political matters ha, would be the first statesman in the cpuntry." In 182$ he was tint returned to Parliamentfor the borough of Lynn.-B.egis, in Norfolk,, , for T/bich he has since s»t without interrupt 'tion. His lordship voted for the principle* of the Reform Bill* but opposed Ministers „on the leading details in commitfeel Lord George remained'«lraost'a silent member until Sic^ -Robert Peel gave up protection in 1846. sHei, then' took his uncle's place jas, leader- of, the, agricultural party, and continued. .'.to, jOiakftj, some severe attacks on the' late Ministry up, to the period of their expulsion from office oof(n f( the Irish Assassination Bill, which he appeased; His disputes with' Lord Lyndburst-ajidj, the Earl of Ripon are, no doubt, still frealijin the recollection of the reader, as are the other - questions in which he was ( an. important mover during the past session.' , His lordship.,, differed with the majority of his party- omthe question of civil and religious, liberty. He 'supported the Jewish ReHef • BUI, aud Mr. Watson's Roman Catholic Relief Bill. His vote on the last mentioned^ question was followed by his ■withdrawal from the Protection- - ist leadership. 1 He announced his intention 3 some time since of supporting the payment of the-Roman Catholic clergy by the landowners , of Ireland. • . „■ j: ; ,, As a patron of the turf, up to the .period of his lordship commencing his political career, his lordship was untiring •+ and his unwearied zeal reforms of the most imporUnt character were secured, while flagrant abuses were exposed and punished. • Many of these are familiar to our readers, and it will be recollected that in testimony of the .sense enter-, tamed of his merits, and the- good he effected, a magnificent subscription was raised by the * sporting community to present him with a u testimonial, the -fruits of which he liberally devoted to charitable purposes, , in aid of thedistresses of trainers and jockeys. . His lord-, ship's stud was numerous, and embraced- animals of-the highest. class. This stud Jne sold to the Hon. Mr. • Mostyn, for £10,000, and the career^ of some of the animals thus transferred has- been singularly brilliant, Surplice, 1 , .out of his lordship's favourite- mare, Crucifix #1 achieving a- triumph which occurred but once-, before (in )1800) — that of winning both Dep-, by and St. Leger — a triumph at the accom-j plishment of which his lordship- had the satisfaction to be present at Doncaster, on Wednesday week. He remained at Doncaster till » the conclusion of the meeting. Lord George Bentinck died suddenly on the 21st September. His death was occasioned by spasm of the heart.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZSCSG18490217.2.8

Bibliographic details

DEATH OF LORD GEORGE BENTINCK., New Zealand Spectator and Cook's Strait Guardian, Volume V, Issue 370, 17 February 1849

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965

DEATH OF LORD GEORGE BENTINCK. New Zealand Spectator and Cook's Strait Guardian, Volume V, Issue 370, 17 February 1849

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