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GERMAN CRISIS

FACED BY RULERS FIERCE DETERMINATION PRODDING THE PEOPLE CARRYING ON CONFLICT By Telegraph—Press Association—Copyright SYDNEY. Oct, 23 Reliable opinion in London is that, although there is no doubt about the deepening crisis in Germany, it cannot be assumed that the home front cannot be kept solid for a vast and urgently-needed defensive effort, says a London correspondent of the Sydney Morning Herald. Nothing reaching London from neutral capitals indicates that the rulers of Germany are organising a peace offensive. On the contrary, the evidence is that jthey are fiercely determined to face the present crisis and to use all their brutal power to overcome the people's growing apathy and hopelessness, and make them produce the necessary extra effort. Brutal Frankness In the opinion of some realistic persons in London whose business it is to •watch and interpret developments inside Germany it is wiser to accept the present prodigious efforts of Hitler, Goebbels, Ley, Himmler, and company as designed to shake the Germans out of their apathy and give them back the will to fight. The Nazi leaders realise the implications of the present situation on the Prussian front and the cumulative effect ■which British and American bombing is having on the people and the •war potential, both of which must be marshalled for a supreme eiloi't. Much of what their leaders are telling the Germans is brutally frank, but frankness does not betray any intention to surrender. Great play is being made of the fact that Germany's defensive battles are still being fought far from the frontiers of the Reich in territory won by armed might in the earlier years of the war. Strength of German Army It is emphasised to the Germans that their army is still a mighty instrument of German power—Allied spokesmen are saying the same thing to their peoples and Allied soldiers in the field realise it. The whole recent Russian campaign ■was fought, and all dispositions in Europe were designed, to keep Germany proper inviolate and the army unbroken. .Behind this plan is the hope of the leaders that, during the delay ■which such strategy brings, firstly there ■will emerge some decisive war-winning weapons 011 which Germany's scientists lire known to be working, and, secondly, that disagreements will arise between Britain, America and Russia, which would mean splitting the Allied front.

POPULACE CRITICAL DISILLUSIONED BY WAR PESSIMISM IN BERLIN LONDON, Oct. '23 Further enlightenment on the gloom ■which recent war developments have cast over Germany is given by a traveller who has just returned from the Ileich. When interviewed by the Stockholm newspaper Dagens Nyheter, the traveller said that war disillusionment and criticism of the German Government were openly expressed in German cities, especially in Munich, where a movement was on foot for an independent Danube monarchy after the war. "The persecution of Catholics and the closing of monasteries in. Munich," he added, "have created very bitter anti-Nazi feelings and enmity against Prussia. Hamburg at first took the Allied bombing raids with British phlegm, bnl quarrels are now continually breaking out among the nervefrayed populace. Plundering and petty theft is rife. "I heard one worker say, 'Unless I get a better place to live in I shall go sick. I am tired of not having a roof over my head, with rain dripping on to my bed. Forty per cent of the workers at my factory disappeared after raids, yet they want us to spend our spare time building stone bungalows for those who have been bombed out.' " The traveller added that there was the same pessimism in Berlin. The discontent was directed against the Government, not against the British who had bombed them.

AMERICAN SHIPPING

VALUE AFTER THE WAR (Reed. 5.35 p.m.) WASHINGTON, Oct. 23 The United States Merchant Marine ■will be the "ace in the hole" at the peace table; its vessels will become 20 per cent more valuable two days after the armistice is signed, said Vice-Ad-miral Emery S. Land, chairman of the Maritime Commission, addressing a committee of the House of Representatives. He said that before the war world shipping consisted of aboijt 57.000,000 dead-weight tons of cargo vessels and 17,000,000 tons of tankers. Of this, Britain owned between 27.000,000 and 35,000,000 tons and the United States 11,000,000 tons. The United States now was ahead of Britain. Admiral Land expressed the opinion that the United States should build up a reserve of ships, primarily fast vessels. "If we had had a merchant marine before the war as large as Britain's," he said, "the war might not have occurred."

GAOL FOR "KING" FORMER NEW ZEALANDER LONDON, Oct. -IV, "I call on God to punish you! Tleil Hitler!" cried "Count" Geoffrey AVladvslaw Vaile Potocfu de Montalk. formerly of New Zealand, who styles himself Wladyslaw, fifth King of Poland, after he had been sentenced in the Police Court at Fpsom, Surrey, to six months' hard labour for a blackout offence. De Montalk appeared in Court wearing a reddish-brown velvet suit, scarlet wool socks, red sandals and naturalcooured wool gloves. His long brown hair was fastened with a clip. His green-sheathed sword lav on the police table. The police stated that de Montalk had failed to answer four previous summonses. He was brought before the Court under arrest. Throughout the proceedings de Montalk spoke in Polish, but a police sergeant said lie could speak and write English perfectly. A constable said he spoke to de Montalk about a light which was showing from his cottage. De Montalk replied- ' Your laws and your Courts have nothing to,do with the King of Poland. 1 would like to see the Germans overrun this country." Be Montalk, after sentence had been passed, spoke in English and announced that he would appeal against the sentence. He applied for bail, which was refused. Geofirev de Montalk. who was previously known in Christchurch and Auckland. went to England in 1027 and adopted his present role. Tie has made a number of appearances in Court, usually spectacular ones. On one occasion in 1939 he said that he and his wife wished to swear by Apollo, which the Judge allowed when he refused to take the usual affirmation. When the Judge made an order for arrears of rent do Montalk remarked: "I sincerely hope Hitler wins the war, Your Honor." The Judge ordered his immediate removal from the Court. B

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Bibliographic details

GERMAN CRISIS, New Zealand Herald, Volume 80, Issue 24723, 25 October 1943

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1,058

GERMAN CRISIS New Zealand Herald, Volume 80, Issue 24723, 25 October 1943

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