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USE AS SCHOOL

TITIRANGI HOTEL DEAF AND DUMB CHILDREN The Titirangi Hotel has boon acquired by the Government lor temporary use as a Xortii Island school for deaf and dumb children. Previously Xorth Island children have attended a school at Sumner, Christchurch. Built about 11 years ago in a commanding position at the end of the concrete road at Titirangi. near the junction of the Waitakere Scenic Drive and the road to Laingholm, the hotel was for a period known as the Titirangi Country Club. The price paid by the Government has not been revealed. About 70 pupils will be accommodated at the school. It is expected to be opened in a few weeks. Mr R. Pickering, principal of the South Island school, will be principal of both schools.

POLAR BEAR FOR ZOO COUNCIL NEGOTIATIONS If negotiations with the Taronga Zoological Park Trust, Sydney, are successful, the polar bear pit at'the Auckland Zoo should be occupied presently by a male bear 12 years of age, which is under offer. The City Council's Parks Committee recommended last night that a sum not exceeding £IOO be spent in procuring the exhibit. The curator, Lieutenant-Colonel E. R. Sawer, reported gifts of about 250 cage birds, including some rare and valuable types, from Mrs. J. P. Campbell, of Remuera; a large collection of fancy pigeons from Mr. Duncan, of Grafton; and a tuatara lizard from Mrs. K. E. Cave, of Tauranga. He considered that the present value of these gifts probably exceeded £4OO.

LOCAL AND GENERAL City Band Concerts As two of the nine bands subsidised by the City Council for Sunday concerts last summer had been unable to fulfil all their engagements, and in view of increasing wartime difficulties, the council decided last night to allocate not more than £2OO for concerts next summer. Tile amount last year was £450. Traffic Control Apparatus An indication that mechanical control of traffic in Auckland is likely to be postponed until after the war "was given last night, when the City Council granted a request of a firm which had tendered for the supply of vehicleactuated signal mechanism that its dejxisit be returned. The firm suggested that no doubt, when times became normal, fresh tenders would be invited. His Majesty's Theatre Modified proposals for converting His Majesty s Theatre for the showing of films bv erecting a projector box of semi-permanent materials in the top gallery were rejected by the City Council last night, on the recommendation of the Works Committee. The latter considered that the council should adhere to its previous decision not to approve the application unless the building conformed in all respects with the council's by-laws. Oral Examinations

In order to save paper, s different technique was being adopted with the half-yearly examinations, and teachers would use as much '"viva voce" examination as the subject permitted, reported the director of the Wellington Technical College, Mr. R. G. Ridling, to the board of governors. Written replies to questions would be restricted, and _ a reasonable estimate of the acquired knowledge of the student would he made by other means. The "Homing" Mallard The homing instinct of flio mallard duck was exemplified lately when a Tauranga resident who had two ducks and a drake in his fowlyard for some years, thinking to place the birds in their natural habitat took them to a stream at Kaimai, 20 miles away, where he liberated them in a pool. The next day lie noticed in the sky two black specks which eventually landed in his yard. The two ducks had returned home. The following morning the drake had joined the family gathering. Newspapers Essential When urging at Gisborne recently that newspaper runners must, subject to some restrictions, have freedom to use the roads and transport facilities in the event of an emergency, Colonel C. V. Ciochetto, regional commissioner of the Emergency Reserve Corps, said lack of news was detrimental to the morale of the people. It was of great importance to ensure the production of at least a news sheet and to see that it was circulated, as when there was no official news alarming rumours were liable to spread. No Sugar For Marmalade Many women whose annual jammaking in the early part of the year was checked by lack of sugar have been pinning their hopes on relaxation of rationing next month when the marmalade orange crop is ready. Further disappointment is in store for them, however. for a Milfnrd resident who wished to make marmalade for patriotic purposes and applied to the Dominion Rationing Controller to learn whether an extra allowance of sugar would be made to housewives, has received a negative reply. "While I realise that supplies should be made available if at all possible," states the controllers reply, "I regret that present stocks do not admit of any relaxation."

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH19420626.2.20

Bibliographic details

USE AS SCHOOL, New Zealand Herald, Volume 79, Issue 24310, 26 June 1942

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804

USE AS SCHOOL New Zealand Herald, Volume 79, Issue 24310, 26 June 1942

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