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TERROR OF FIRE

JAPANESE PEOPLE ■RAIDS ARE A NIGHTMARE WHAT BOMBS ON TOKIO MEAN NEW YORK, May 2 Japan was recently bombed. Her people's morbid fear of attack from the air, which already had reached the proportions of a national psychosis, is beginning to be realised. That fear has accounted for many of the island empire's war moves, writes Henry C. Wolfe in the New York Times. The Japanese literally live in a house of tinder. Their wood and paper and bamboo dwellings make their cities more vulnerable to air attack than the cities of any other great Power. Incendiary bombs are Nippon's nightmare. Fear of fire is bred in the people. The Japanese is ordinarily stoical and fatalistic. He does not easily betray his emotions. He can endure great physical strain. He prides himself on being a member of a martial race. He speaks proudly of a Samurai tradition, of Bushido, the way of the warrior. When be goes to Yasukuni to pray for the spirit of his brother killed in the "China Incident'' his face is as devoid of expression as a mask. Earthquake of 1923 Yet confronted with fire hazard he bas been known to break down. He has given way to panic. This he notably did in the earthquake fire .of "102:?, which destroyed about two-thirds of Tokio. In a frenzy he and his fellows massacred hundred of Korean labourers. The Japanese authorities know these contradictions in their people's psychology. They know the deeply-ingrained terror of firs in the Japanese mind. They have reason to suspect that under persistent, bombing attacks the morale of the Japanese masses might, weaken. The combustible Nipponese cities and the ever-present fear of fire make an ideal set-up for bombing attack, and Japanese war preparation in the psychological sphere has not been entirely successful. The militarists of Nippon, though they were among the first people in the world to institute air-raid drills in towns and cities, have found no answer to the problem of psychological defence against the incendiary bomb. Uneasiness of Leaders

What they promised the inhabitants of the great cities was that enemy bombers would never be able to reach Japan. The invincible Japanese army and navy would see to that. The defenders of Nippon would carry the war to the enemy, would keep the foe's bombers far from the land of cherry blossoms. But the army and navy leaders were uneasy. Their uneasiness was brought home to me in a direct, personal way. When I went to Japan a year ago a certain "business man," Kiyoshi Kanai, was almost constantly at my elbow. No matter what the company, I found him one of the guests. For a business man he took an extraordinary interest in American public opinion. Later, in Hongkong. United Nations intelligence officers me that he was an important agent of the Japanese intelligence service. They charted the course of his questions and remarks. Congested. City His aim was to learn more about American war psychology. American public opinion was a war factor that even the best Japanese spies operating in the United States might fail to interpret correctly. Kauai's specific assignment apparently was to try to find the answer to this question; Would sentimentalists in America oppose our bombing the wooden cities of Japan P All the ingenuity of the Japanese army and civilian authorities has been mobilised to solve the problem of attack from the air. Nothing, apparently, has been neglected. But every intelligent Japanese knows that no fire-fight-ing methods can protect the miles and miles of flimsy, cellarless, wooden houses in a great congested city like Tokio, with its 7,000,000 people.

BIG RUGBY MATCH

TANK BRIGADE V. AUCKLAND An outstanding Rugby attraction at Eden Park on Saturday afternoon will be a match between the New Zealand Tank Brigade team and the Auckland representative fifteen. The military side, is a very strong one, being comprised of players practically all of whom have represented their various provinces, while some have gained North or South Island honours, have taken part in All Black trials, and have played for New Zealand or NewZealand Universities. The pack is i powerful one McKenzie, of All Black fame, weighs list Rib and Humphries and Bishop both ltist. The average weight of the forwards is over 1-lst 71b. All the backs, with the exception of the two Otago Bve-eighths. are well-known to tht- Auckland public. The fact that there are four former Auckland representatives in the team, together with G. B. Nelson, ex-Auckland light-heavy-weigh: amateur boxing champion, will add to the interest in the fixture. Mr. F. W. Lucas, sole selector to the Auckland Rugby Union, has chosen a good allround side to take the field for Auckland. A solid and mobile pack of forwards is supported by a speedy set of backs. Eight members of the team have previously represented Auckland. Following are the teams: —

New Zealand Tank Brigade.—Fullback, H. Johns (Taranaki); three-quarters, L. ColmoreWilliams (Auckland), J. Molloy (Auckland). C. Sullivan (Taranaki); five-eighths, L. Manion (Otagvi). J. Robinson (Otago); halfbark, M. P. Donnelly (Canterbury); frontrow, R. A. Godfrey (West Coast), C. S. Pass mo re (Auckland). K Ladbrook (Auckland); middle-row, R. M. McKenzie (Manawatu). R Humphries (Buller), W. Bishop (Wellington), G. B. Nelson (Auckland); backrow, D. P. Grant (North Otago). Reserves: Dalbeth, Elkis, Peake (backs); Don, Porter. Arnold (forwards). Auckland,—Fullback, R. Sorenson (Marist), threequarters, B. Faire (C.R.0.), I. Gregory (M.T.P.), E. Boggs (C.R.0.); five-eighths, N. Pear man (A.S.C.), L. Rae (A.S.C.); halfback. P. Tetzlaff (Grafton-Porisonby); front row. i. H. Pearce (Grafton-Ponsonby), F. Glover (M.T.P.). J. Gilmour (Grammar-University); middle row, W. Smith (Manukau), R. R. 'J" 11 (Grafton-Ponsonby), J. Wilson (Grafton-Pon-fonbv). M M Smith ((iarrison); back row, D. Milk (G.R.0.). Reserves: Backs. J. Gemming (f.R.O.i. L Butler (C.R.0.). R. B r J. ns " den (takapuna); forwards, 11. Badle.v (M.T.P.). J. Gunning (Garrison).

BOXING PROGRAMME Two Auckland lisrht-weiirht boxers, Ernie Underwood and C'larrie Gordon, have been matched at the Town Hall on Monday .next in a professional contest of 12 three-minute rounds, Both are clever exponents of fast, scientific punching and the bout should profide plenty of thrills. An excellent amateur faction will feature in support, the bouts lieing as follows.- D. Rollinson (Farooryi, !-■'• ~v j W. O'Gonnan (Butler), 12.'J; K. Wells UiilJcrest), ft. 1 •_» v L. Urqnhart (Butler), 0-3 —; KGould (Facoorv), n.n, v. M. Hallaron (Butler). 8.0; B. ('atlev (Butler), I<>,3, v. B. Jj.vall (R.V.). ft 1 :$. Harris (Otahuhu), f)./, v. A. Waters HA'.), !».!•_'; 'J'. Kara (Butler), l'—i. W. J. Anderson (Kith), J'-'.l'J.

LADIES' GOLF MATCHES Auckland. —The following players qiialified for the Jessie Reid Rose Bowl:—-Miss A. Jfoakes Mrs 0. R. Buttle. Miss S. Mahonej. Mrs. W. B Souter, Mrs. J. W. Craven Al.su P. Bodies. Mrs. S. .7. Robinson, Mrs. 11. J Williams, Mrs. J. «. Coletrrove Mrs. R. IHrXiven, Mrs. A, R. Abbott, Miss B. .Nolan. Miss M. Graham, Mrs. G. R. Bennett Mrs J. M. Wilson, Mrs. C. N. Jacobsen. Mrs. ft. O'XeiU's trophies were won bv Miss jN. iNoakes. Si», 10 —73, nnd Miss S. Mahonoy. 10T». 23—77 Otahuhu.—The following players won t.neir matches in the first round of the handica) foursomes:—Wednesday players: Mrs, PossenJeskie and Mrs. Wallace, Misses L. and b ®unciman. Mrs. Adams and M/s. Hunt, Mrs. Wilson and Mrs. Allbrlffhton. urdav Players: Misses Battersby and Armstrong Misses Woodcock and Coward. Mrs. ond Mrs Henderson. Misses Wilcqck and V\ nson, Misses Ilvnes and I'ocock. Misses Peebl<»find Smith Mrs. Clarke and Miss Waters. Misses Dnr'rien and McComb. C grade medal: Mrs. R. Skinner. 114. 30—78: Miss Davis 115, SG—7;>

PLAY IN THE COUNTRY Morrinsvilie Club. —Members took part in a StaMeford competition, the winner being A G. Brown with l'O. The next best were: -A ■aeedham. T. Ryan. 2S; M. Da vies. -<•

GEARAXTEED STOMACH TREATMENT Maves Stomach Compound—new malt, supP e ry, elm nnd herbal treatment for ulcers, E' 1 "" tritis, sickness, etc. Mavcx Compound, all demists and stores. —Advt. __ neglect Colds—take jPPooda' Great Peppermint Cure. —(Advt.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH19420617.2.47

Bibliographic details

TERROR OF FIRE, New Zealand Herald, Volume 79, Issue 24302, 17 June 1942

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1,321

TERROR OF FIRE New Zealand Herald, Volume 79, Issue 24302, 17 June 1942

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