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ELECTION NOTES.

WORKING ARRANGEMENT. COUNTRY PARTY AND LABOUR EVIDENCE FROM FRANKLIN. The refusal of the national executive of the Labour Party to endorse the candidature of Mr. J. H. Edwards for Franklin, who was officially approved by the Labour organisation of the electorate, is convincing evidence in support of the belief that there is an understanding between the Country and Labour Parties. It is more than a coincidence that for the Bay of Islands, Kaipara, Waikato and 'Tauranga seats Country Party candidates should have a clear field agaiasC Coalition candidates, while in Marsden, Hauraki, Raglan and Thames there are official Labour candidates, but no representatives of the Country Party. In Franklin Mr. Edwards was prepared to carry the official Labour banner and the local organisation approved, but he is denied the official mark, and the very vigour with which Labour is refuting his claim makes it abundantly clear that the Labour Party wishes to give Mr. IT. 0. Mellsop, the Country Party nominee, a straight-out contest, with Mr. J. N. Massey, the Coalition Fteform representative. During the Hauraki by-election the statement was publicly, made by Mr. C. H. Mellsop, who is not to be confused with (he candidate, that there was collusion between Country and Labour, and he affirmed that at the general election no Labour candidate would be put up for Franklin. Both Mr. Rushworth and Mr. Ross denied the existence of such an understanding, but Mr. C. H. Mellsop repeated his statement and said that he had "five iron men" to say that the closing of Franklin nominations would prove it. The nominations have proved it. Tho anxiety of Labour to proclaim that Mr. Edwards' candidature is • not endorsed further proves it. A letter from a Labour supporter in Franklin published to-day suggests that Mr. Edwards' will be a good vote-splitter. Obviously, the intention is to give the Country Party man the Labour vote. Why? The Country Party is practically free trade. Labour is strongly protectionist. They are a queer pair to put in double harness for any other purpose than that of pulling down the Government. ■ A WAY OFT. " Do you think it fair that a married man should get more for the same work than a single man, who does it as well or better? Why-should the single man be crucified," feelingly asked a questioner of Mr. H. 0. Mellsop at Papakura lastevening. "Why not get married, Bill ?' k came the quick retort from another member of the audience. BACK TO NATURE. Humour often relieves the seriousness of politics. A question at Mr. J. N. Massey's meeting at Waiuku was: "Is it fair to subsidise the wheatgrower and leave the woolgrower out ?" Mr. Massev was carefully explaining why there was no subsidy on wool when a voice interjected, "It is all right. We-can't do without bread, but we could run around | as nature made us." This was greeted S with roars of laughter, in. which the canS didate jo'ned. • • ■ . STING IN THE TAIL. "I'm thoroughly in favour of members | of Parliament paying their own boat and \ (rain fares when they are not on public business," said Mr. J. McCombs, Labour candidate for Lyttelton, in reply to a question. "Good boy," came back at once from the questioner. "But wait a minute," continued the .candidate. "X member of Parliament is never off duty; he does not get. the chance. Member# are not overpaid and being a good unionist I. would vote for an increase."

FUTILITY OF PLEDGES. ? In referring to letters sent to him, Mr. W. Ap"pleton, Coalition candidate for i Wellington South, stated the other evening that if he were to give effect to all : the pledges he had been asked to sign he would not be able to call his soiil his own, if he were returned to Parliament. He was more than surprised that responsible bodies of people should in this way try to force their opinions upon individual candidates. He would give no pledges to anyone, but would merely usa his best efforts in the interests of the . whole community. THE WAIUKU RAILWAY. "If the Railways Board decide to close the Waiuku railway, what will you do*?" was a question put to Mr. J. N. Massey, Coalition candidate for Franklin, at Waiuku on Thursday evening. "The matter is entirely in your own hands," was the reply. "If you patronise the line it will not be closed, as all the Railways Board is asking , is that it should pay working expenses. In any case, I would oppose it being closed, as to maintain roads to carry the traffic now carried by the railway wduld mean a great increase in county rates." POINT OF NATIONALITY. The whispering campaign during- elections is an .insidious and unfair method of discrediting a candidate, and one which is difficult to combat. Mr. J. A. C. Allum, the Coalition candidate for the Auckland West seat, had occasion to referat his meeting last evening to propaganda of this nature. It had come to his attention, he said, that .there had been suggestions that" he was not of British birth, but he made it clear that ha was a British subject, born of British parents. He expressed the opinion that the doubt oh this point had been occasioned by the fact, that he was the Consul for Switzerland. This honour had been conferred upon him because he was able to speak three of the four languages used by the Swiss and was in a position to deal with the people of that nation either visiting the Dominion or residing here. FURTHER OUT OPPOSED. An interjector at a meeting addressed by Mr. T. Forsyth, Coalition candidate for Wellington East, asked whether ' the speaker would oppose a further wage cut. "Yes, I think I would," Mr. Forsyth replied. "If there is to be any further wage cut,. then all parties must come into it." The questioner: "Would you resign rather than accept it?" The candidate: "No, that is equivalent to saying that because „ I cannot get my own way I will not play any more." CITY AND COUNTRY ELECTORATES. The view that country and city constituencies could not be treated on the same basis if it was proposed to reduce the number of representatives in Parliament, was expressed by Mr. W. P. Endean, Coalition candidate for Parnell, m his address at Remuera last evening. The country electorates, he said, were a - ready too large to permit a reduction m the number of rural members. • n cities," he added, " the position » drfw„t. If »<< members to be persona , allow them to <tawto OS3&"" representation might

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Bibliographic details

ELECTION NOTES., New Zealand Herald, Volume LXVIII, Issue 21042, 28 November 1931

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1,099

ELECTION NOTES. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXVIII, Issue 21042, 28 November 1931

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