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PROSPECTS IN OTAGO.

LITTLE CHANGE LIKELY. MR. TAVERNER ENDANGERED. STIFF FIGHT FOR MR. WAITE. [by telegraph.—own correspondent.] DUNEDIN, Saturday. Now that nominations of candidates have closed it is possible to make a forecast of the results in the various electorates. In Dunedin West the Minister of Finance, the Hon. W. Downie Stewart, is opposed by Mr. J. Gilchrist, Labour, and Mr. J. McDonald, Independent Liberal. The chances of the last-named can bo written down as negligible, but the Labour man is sure to secure a solid vote. The general opinion, however, is that Mr. Stewart's position is not seriously threatened. In Dunedin North there were five candidates a week ago, but the number has now been reduced to three, Mr. J. W. Munro, the sitting Labour member, Mr; J. Mcliae, Official Coalition, and Mr. R. S. Black, United. The split vote should operate in favour of the Labour candidate, but it is thought that a fair proportion of Labour supporters will throw their weight in on the side of Ma Black. 'I he result of the contest is very open, but Mr. Munro should retain the seat. Two candidates are in the field for Dunedin Central, Sir Charles Slatham, the Speaker, and Mr. F. Neilson, Labour. Sir Charles should have no difficulty in retaining the seat. The Dunedin South seat i 3 at present held by Mr. W. B. Taverner, who is carrying the Official Coalition banner. There are two other candidates, Mr. D. C. Cameron, Independent Reform, and Mr. F. Jones, Labour. It was thought that- Mr. Cameron would withdraw at the last moment, but now that he has expressed his determination to go to the poll the split vote should operate strongly in favour of Mr. Jones. There is a strong Labour vote in the electorate and Mr. Taverner's stocks have undoubtedly fallen since the last election, when, in a triangular contest he was returned by a majority of 33 votes over his Labour opponent, Mr. R. W. Hall. Mr. Jones should win the seat. There is little likelihood of a change in Chalmers electorate, and Mr. A. E. Ansell, the Official Coalitionist, should be returned by a substantial majority. He has two opponents, Mr. N. H. Campbell, Labour, and Mr. T. Scollay, Independent. The Labour man is sure to poll well, but Mr. Scollay's chances cannot be seriously considered. In Clutha Mr. F. Waite, Official Coalition, will have a stiff fight to retain his seat against Mr. P. McSkimming, United, and if Mr. Waite wins his lead will probably be small. In Central Otago there are two candidates, Mr. W. A. Bodkin, Official Coalition, and Mr. C. Todd, Reform. The former's chances are most favoured.

FARMING INTERESTS. COUNTRY PARTY'S ADVOCACY CONTEST FOR ROTORUA SEAT. [from our own correspondent.] HAMILTON. Sunday. An attentive hearing was given to Mr. D. R. F. Campbell, Country Party candidate for Rotorua, at Tirau on Friday evening. Mr. W. H. Allen presided. Mr. Ctmpbell said the Country Tarty had been accused of vote-splitting, but the fault did not lie with the Country Party. It. was caused by those who wero responsible for not bringing in a better system for recording the wishes of the electors than existed at present. The speaker supported the derating of farm lands and every scheme which would reduce the cost of production. Mr. Campbell dealt with currency problems and said it was wrong to trust the Government with currency, for the reason that it lacked the expert knowledge necessary to solve the difficulties involved. A State bank should be established by a body of economists and bankers and conducted in the interests of the country. The candidate said the Country Party was opposed to protective tariffs and considered that no duties should be imposed on the necessities of life or on the implements and machinery required for production. The only way in which the cost of living could be reduced was to lower the tariffs against Empire goods. The cost of living should and could be reduced before cuts were made in wages. Secondary industries should be rationalised, said Mr. Campbell, and subsidies should be given to those industries which it was reasonable to foster. There were more factories than were necessary 'in New Zealand and the result was that capital charges against the goods produced were excessive. The candidate advocated direct taxation as against customs or indirect taxation, so ihat those who received the most would pay the most and the burden on the people of small means would be lightened. The candidate was accorded a vote of thanks.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH19311123.2.118

Bibliographic details

PROSPECTS IN OTAGO., New Zealand Herald, Volume LXVIII, Issue 21037, 23 November 1931

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762

PROSPECTS IN OTAGO. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXVIII, Issue 21037, 23 November 1931

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