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THE PARNELL CONTEST.

MR. ENDEAN AT REMUERA.

STABILITY OR SOCIALISM. LABOUR POLICY ATTACKED. The Coalition candidate for Parnell, Mr. W. P. Endean, opened his election campaign last evening with a public address in the I'emu era Library Hall. About 150 people were present. The candidate received an attentive hearing and at the close a motion was adopted, without dissent, expressing; confidence in him on behalf of both the Reform and United Party groups and pledging him support. Mr. J. P. Patcrson presided, and among those on the platform were Mr. J. Caughlev, Auckland secretary of the United Party, who had withdrawn his candidature for Parnell in Mr. Endean's favour, and Mr. ,T. Adams, the United Party chairman for the electorate. "I am glad to see not only so many of tho 'old guard' of the Reform Party but also prominent United Party supporters," said Mr. Endean. "I am sure that if the coalition pact is honoured by the electors the Government will be able to bring about reforms, to stabilise our finances and bring prosperity to the country." In stating his reasons for supporting the Coalition, Mr. Endean said the new Cabinet had done remarkably well in a short time. In some respects liovhad disagreed with tho legislation, but he felt that in the main the measures were fair and would be beneficial. Stable Party Needed. Mr. Endean appealed for confidence in the Government's ability to carry out its task. It would have been a great advantage, he said, if independent umpires could have been appointed in electorates to decide between candidates and allow Coalition supporters to present an unbroken front to Socialism. By retirements some good men had been lost, but the interests of the country would be met by returning a stable party with good leaders. Circumstances were changing so rapidly that there must be a strong Cabinet, capable of taking quick action. On the precedents of Australia and Great Britain, was a Socialist Labour Party likely to be capable of managing the affairs of New Zealand in the present difficult times? Democracy was now on its trial, and in Britain it had come through successfully, with the electors' recorded determination to fight the economic war to a finish. "In saying this I make no attack on individual members of the Labour Party," said Mr. Endean. "I have many friends in the ranks of Labour." Labour's Lust for Power. "Even yesterday, Mr. Coates gave Mr. Holland a,*broad hint that his party would be accepted if it would come into a national Government. Labour is standing out because of a lust for power. The way the trade union bosses are thrusting themselves on the party would ruin NewZealand, whether a Lib our Government s policy were good or bad. If Mr. Holland were" a big m m he would come in and say: 'We are not out for power, but only to" help New Zealand in a great national crisis.' " _ . In his recent speech in the Wellington j Town Hall. Mr. Holland had brought out ! the old, glittering array of promises. He would raise £25,000.000 in three years—but where would he get it? 'Who would lend such a sum to a Labour-Socialist Government ? Mr. M. J. Savage had suggested that war-time compulsory loan measures should oe taken in the present economic war, but to extort money from the people by threats would destroy the financial reputation of the country. Mr. Caughley's Support.

In regard to unemployment, Mr. Holland stood for paying standard wages for all. "I am downright sorry for friends and old schoolmates of mine who are on relief work," remarked Mr. Endean, " but we have not the money to do this. Mr. Holland seems to think the Consolidated Fund is a cornucopia, from which abundant wealth will flow, but it is nothing of the sort." The Coalition Government, said Mr. Endean in conclusion, was dealing with unemployment in a practical way. It was trying t0 keep men on the land and sustain'the production of exports. Personally, he meant to give all the people in his' electorate a fair deal. He wanted to help in getting New Zealand out of her troubles. A strong Government was needed, and he firmly believed that tho only way to get one was to support the Coalition. (Applause.) A motion pledging support to the candidate under the coalition agreement was moved by Mr. E. N. Ormiston. Mr. Caughley, in seconding the motion, said his own " retirement had been endorsed by the United Party's emergency committee and would be submitted to the general committee for approval. He was sure that Mr. Endean's candidature would be endorsed in a proper coalition spirit by the electors of Parnell. The motion was earned without dissent.

THE POSITION IN THAMES.

MR. W. MARSHALL RETIRES. [BY TELEGRAPH.—-OWN CORRESPONDENT.] THAMES, Thursday. The chairman of the United Party in the Thames electorate, Mr. W. Madp ! wick, stated this morning that Mr. \Y. i Marshall had definitely withdrawn Ins candidature for the Thames scat at the request of supporters. lie wished it made plain that he was not withdrawing owing lo the coalition, but because the local committee considered it inadvisable in local interests to contest the seat. SUPPORT FOR COALITION. REFORM PARTY IN MARSDEN. [by telegraph.—-own correspondent.] WHANG ARE I, Thursday. The Whangarei branch of the New Zea land Political Reform League last evening carried a resolution recommending the Marsden electorate executive lo support the Rt. Hon. J. G. Coates' decision regarding the Coalition. At a meeting of the Warkworth branch of tho league last evening a similar motion was carried. STRATFORD ELECTORATE. MR. POLSON FOR COALITION. [by telegraph. —press association.] STRATFORD, Thursday. Mr. W. J. Poison, the sitting Independent member, is announced as the official Coalition candidate for the Stratford contest. Mr. Poison pays a tribute to the Rt. Hon. G. W. Forbes and the p { Hon J. G. Coates for tho loyalty they had displayed to the Coalition Their spirit, he says, will ensure the solidarity of the Coalition. Mr H N. Moss, Independent candidate ' opened' his campaign last night He Vigorously attacked the removal of the graduated land tax and demanded compulsory reduction of interest.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH19311113.2.123

Bibliographic details

THE PARNELL CONTEST., New Zealand Herald, Volume LXVIII, Issue 21029, 13 November 1931

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1,028

THE PARNELL CONTEST. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXVIII, Issue 21029, 13 November 1931

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