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THE OFFICIAL COUNT.

COMPLETION BY TUESDAY.

SCRUTINY COMMENCES TO-DAY. CHECKING NAMES ON ROLL. It is not anticipated the official count of the votes recorded at tho election on Wednesday will lie completed until Tuesday. A great amount of arduous work attaches to the duties of returning officers and their staffs after the initial count on tho night df the election, and they will have their time fully occupied to get the Anal figures out early next week In most cases any Blight alteration the official count may mako in the totals will be merely of formal interest, but where the margin of votes between the candidates is small tho final result will bo awaited impatiently. One reason why it takes four or five days to complete an official count is tho necessity for scru tinising tho rolls at the commencement In a few electorates this was begun last night, but the majority of returning offl cers will set tho process in motion first thing this morning. A studious checking-tip is made of all names which have been crossed off the rolls, as indicating that the electors have and by comparing roll with roll from tho different polling-booths it is possibl<f to detect instances of duplicate voting. All ballot-papers thus proved to have been filled in illegally are classed informal. The scrutiny of tho rolls will probably bo completed this evening, thus clearing the way for a start to bo made with tho count.

The procedure followed by returning officers is to count first the ballot-papers already opened and to re-examine tho papers that wero originally put aside as informal. \yhcn this is completed the absentee and postal voting papers and the seamen's rights are opened and counted, and the figures added to the totals already obtained. This completes the count as far as the general election is concerned The writs must be returned to Wellington by Wednesday, November 28.

The absentee votes are particularly numerous tjus year, partly owing to the new facilities, including postal voting, in troduccd for the benefit of the sick and infirm and persons who find themselves out of their electorate on ejection day., and partly owing to tho increased num her of people travelling. In five Auek land electorates, lloskill, Eden, Manukau, Auckland East and Auckland West, the total votes still to come in number over 800, in Parnell over 900, and in Waitomnta 1096, while in two electorates, Wai ternata and Auckland Central, seamen's rights total over 170. The licensing referendum returns will not be dealt with until tho election count is over. Representatives of the parties* interested in the referendum will then be invited to act as scrutineers, and the official count will be proceeded with on lines similar to those laid down for the election issue. COMMENT ,IN LONDON. THREE-PARTY SYSTEM. DISADVANTAGE ILLUSTRATED. Australian nnd N.Z. Press Association. (Received November 15, 11.35 p.m.) LONDON. Nov. 15.

Commenting on the result of the general election in New Zealand, the Daily Telcs\iph says politics in the Dominion never lack dramatic quality. The country will now again experience the disadvantage of tho three-party systom. The difference botween the Reform and Liberal programmes is almost too subtle to be distinguished in England. However, it may be suspected that Sir Joseph Ward's advocacy of a development loan of £70,000,000, from which ho would make advances to farmers on easy terms, and his proposal to subsidise the minor industries have pleased many voters, who regard Mr. Coates as an unduly stern economist.

The Daily Chronicle remarks that Now Zealand has been through a most remarkable election. The United Liberal Party under Sit Joseph Ward scored a striking success at short notice. This result was obtained liv the Liberals definitely opposing both tfie other parties and offering voters who disliked either extreme a distinct third alternative. THE NEW MEMBERS. FURTHER BIOGRAPHIES. From the results now available 35 new members will lake their seats in Parliament when tho new session opens, although of course some of these have sat in previous Parliaments. Below are given brief biographical notes on new members not included among the newcomers whose careers were reviewed in yesterday's isouo of tho Hkhami.

MR. E. Y. HEALY. Mr. E. F. llealy, who has won the Wairau scat for the United Party, was born near Blenheim on September 28, 1869, and was educated at a State school. After 1.6 years in the blacksmithing trade, he went into the cycle importing business, subsequently establishing himself as a stock and station agent and auctioneer in Blenheim. The business was later sold to Messrs Dalgety, Ltd., and for the following five years Mr. llealy controlled tho stock, wool 'and general agency department for that firm. He then purchased a sheep and cattlo run, retiring in 1920. ' Mr. Ifealy's association with public; life consists of membership of the Pclorus Road Board, Wairau Licensing Committee, school committees in Canterbury and Marlborough, and tho Marlborough Patriotic Association. At present ho is u member of tho Wairau Hospital Byard. Mr. Honly has taken the keenest interest in horse racing, trotting, football, bowling, and cycling, and still holds executive positions with the Wairau Valley and Pelorns Hack Racing Chilis, Marlboiough Trotting Club, and Nelson Jockey and Trotting Clubs. Ho has successfully raced gallopers and trotters himself since 1889. and has acted as jud«;o of light horses and fat stock at various agricultural shows. He represented Marlborough and South Canterbury in Rugby football, and has been a member of tho Blenheim and Nelson Bowl-, ing Clubs for manv years. ITo is n past president of tho Nelson Motor-Cycle Association. Mr. llealy resides in Blenheim. MR. A. A. McLACHLAN. Mr. A. A McLachlan who has been elected as a United by Riccarton, is the son of Mr. Archibald McLachlan, an old resident of the district, and grandson of the late Mr. John McLachlan, for some years Liberal membei for Ashburton. Mr. A. A. McLachlan was educatod at the Ohristchurch Roys' High School, and at Canterbury College, where he graduated in 1919. After acting as a teacher at Wanganui College he returned to the Christchurch Boys' High School, where he studied for tb LL.B. degree. In 1925 ho was admitted to (he Bar, and is now the snnioj- partner in the legal .firm of McLachlan, A tack and Hill» Ho has continued to take a very active part in education matters, in horticulture and agriculture, and is n keen amateur gardener and connoisseur of the natural flora of tlio Dominion.

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Bibliographic details

THE OFFICIAL COUNT., New Zealand Herald, Volume LXV, Issue 20105, 16 November 1928

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1,081

THE OFFICIAL COUNT. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXV, Issue 20105, 16 November 1928

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