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POPULAR RESORTS.

lURGE OF THE HIGHWAY. WEEK-END TRIPS. I WIDE choice in province. ,Within a few weeks inquiries for motor touring itineraries will begin pouring in to the automobile associations and Auckland motorists will be planning tours and week-end trips. The province embraces so many attractive resorts that even the pioneers who have been at the wheel for a cuarter of a century can find novelty in a motor holiday. It is unfortunate that r.iany popular trips, have to be taken vith a careful eve on tlie weather, but the comprehensive loading policies which have come with the petrol tax are bringing more interesting snots within allweather range.

Some of the finest scenery in the North Island exists on unmetalled roads but it is possible to get such variety without deviating from the beaten track that the majority of the new recruits to the ranks of motorists would not consider any trip which would necessitate the discomforts which faced the earlier followers of recreation on the highway. A few years ago chains were necessary before one could go far from Auckland. The Rangiriri Hills interposed a barrier between Auckland and the Waikato. Until a few weeks ago the Mamaku Bush Road was a quagmire in sections after rain. As these obstacles are obliterated the motorist increases his touring field, since there are many people who would cover old ground year after year before they would carry chains or risk a pull through the mud. Following are trips which provide interesting travel:— ARAPUNI. Arapuni is visited by thousands of motorists annually, and from Hamilton there is a fine round trip through Hora-

hora to Arapuni, returning via Kihikilii and To Awamutu. The Arapuni route follows the main Rotorua Road from Hamilton and miles beyond Cambridge it branches to the right following the Waikato River. Horahora is reached three miles from tbis junction and the power house will be seen on the right. After a time the scouring of the banks of the river below Arapuni will be noticed and before rising up the bill a can be made to view the buried forest. Rising, the road from Putaruru joins, and shortly Arapuni village is passed. Beyond the village tlie clam is crossed and Arapuni lake stretches southward. At the far side of the bridgo a turn to the right should be made to see the power house, outdoor station, spillway and falls. Returning to the darn cross the bridge over the outlet from the lake and within half a mile to (he right is the A.A.A. direction indicator. This illustrates the direction of the various towns in the North Island and also indicates the points of interest at Arapuni. On the road to Kihikilii there are two miles of clay and the site of the historic battle at Orakau Pa is passed. The main south road is joined at Kihikilii a turn to the right being made by the sign for Hamilton to Auckland. TAURANGA. The metalling of the Kaimai Hills brings Tauranga within easy reach of the city for week-end runs. If the weather has been fine the journey to Tauranga can be made across the Hauraki Plains to Paeroa and thence via Waihi. There is an uiunetalled gap on this routo but a couple of fine days dries the road. At Tauranga there is every provision for motor campers, and the road via the Kaimai Hills now forms an all-weather outlet that can be negotiated even if wet weather prevails. Once over the Kaimai there are alternate routes. By bearing to the left at the A.A.A. signs the main Hamilton Road goes through To Poi and Hinuera, joining the Rotorua Road and continuing via Cambridge. 'J ho righthand route leads to j\lata.mata from where there is the choice of the ie Aroha and Paeroa, or the Morrinsvillo and Taupiri routes. GLENMURRAY AND WAINGARAO. The circuit via Olenmurray to the Waingaro J lot Springs, returning via Nfjaruawalna and iaujeri, or Pukemiro and jfuutly promises to be a popular week-end rim during the coming Minimer. The routes have all been signposted recent I v bv the A.A.A. and, after crossing the Waikato River bridge at Tuakau, there is no difficulty in finding the way. The trip passes over unmetalled surfaces' and is therefore only recommended for line weather.

OREWA AND WAIWERA. Tho week-end resorts on the East Coast attract many motorists and tho improvements made to tho Albany route now makes the journey to Orewa possible with comfort in all weathers. From Devonport the main road passes through Takapuna and Milford and then climbs up Sheriff's Hill, from the top of which there are commanding views of the lfauraki Gulf. The Brown's Bay Road is passed, and 11-j miles from Devonport the Albany metal road turns to tho left. In wet weather it is necessary to run through to Albany (t\so miles) and then follow the Albany-Silverdale route via Dairy Flat. On the Fast Coast Road, Devonport to Silverdalo, there is still an unmetalled

stretch which proves troublesome in wet weather. From Silverdalo it is only a short dislanco to the Orewa Beach, the roads to Arkle's Bay, Manly and Red Beach branching off from this section. About 300 yards beyond the Orewa Bridge a track leads down through the lupins to the beach which may be used at low tide. Care should be exercised iu the soft sand at the top of the beach. The road rises over a hill before reaching lladfield's Beach and then the Waiwera Ilill with its sharp corners is negotiated before dropping to tho Waiwcra Hot Springs (20 miles). It is a very pleasant round trip to continue up alongside the Waiwcra e:>tuary, taking the road through Wainui, Kaukapakapa and via Helens- | viile to Auckland. (59 miles.)

COROMANDEL AND MERCURY BAY. Tlio Corornandel Peninsula has become n holiday resort patronised by motorists from far arid wide. Leaving Thames one comes first to Louglin's Bay, a sandy, shelving beach, inviting bathing. Next is Wood's Bay, or as the Maoris called it, Whakatere. Thornton's Bay is just north and hero was established tlio first orchard in this disrict. It was also an old habitation of tlio Maoris and skulls and remains have been unearthed at this spot. Continuing, Puru is reached, this being the silo of an old timber-milling town, and then Waiomio is passed before arriving at Tapu. There are several more bays before the road rises over the headland to descend to Manaia, and then over the Tiki Flats to Corornandel. Northwards, a clay surface extends through Amodeo Bay, and Colvillo to Port Charles. At all these settlements the motorist is welcomed and assured of a pleasant stop. At Tapu a road runs inland toward Whitianga and connects with the Coromandel-Whitianga route. The Tapu route affords wonderful scenery and its ciav formation presents a good surface in tlio summer months. Whitianga is on the shores of Mercury Bay. and first-class hotel and camping accommodation are both available. (Auckland to Corornandel, 107 miles; Corornandel to Whitianga, 21 miles.) HELENSVILLE HOT SPRINGS. With the improvement of tho main highway to Hcllensville, motorists are patronising the Parakai Hot Springs at Helerisvillc in increasing numbers. The Domain Board is tins year providing convenience in the Domain at tho springs for motor campers. The concrete road is followed through Henderson, tho best route then being reached by continuing to tho end of the concrete an.d travelling via Lincoln Road. Higher levels are shortly reached and there is a lino view of the western suburbs of the city from near the llobsonviile Road. At Waimauku care must lie taken to turn to the left at the cross roads, a turn to the right then being made after a couple of hundred yards. The Kaipara River is joined near Ohiringi railway station, and a mile beyond this the hot springs and the llelensville township routes separate. The springs are half a mile to the left. There is good accommodation at the springs, most of the houses having mineral Laths. (37 miles.) OKOROIRE AND TE AROEA. A very pleasant week-end run can be made through Okoroirc, Matamata and To Aroha. Tho main Rotorua Road is followed through Hamilton and Cambridge to Tirau, where a sign points to Okoroiro hot springs, three miles to tho left. There is good accommodation at the springs, and in the morning the run of 13 miles to Matamata can bo made, another four miles separating tho crystal and opal hot springs at Okauia on the banks of tho Waihon River. The route runs through Wahaioa. to Te Aroha. 'J his is also a suitable stop for a night. The return journey, completing tho circuit, passes through Paeroa and crosses the Hauraki Plains to Pokeno, and thenco along the Great South Road to Auckland.

KAIAUA. Situated on the western shores of the Thames Estuary, Kaiaua is a pleasant spot for week-enders. Camping sites are available) and a hotel provides accommodation for those who prefer the comfort of indoors. There is a proposal at the present to continue tho road north from Kaiaua, or New Brighton as it is sometimes called, to connect with Matingurahi where tho route from Clevedon and Papakura now ends. To reach ' Kaiaua follow the Great South Road until almost into I'okeno and then turn off at the Thames and Paeroa signs. This route is followed for another nine and a-half miles when the Miranda and Kaiaua Road goes straight ahead. Tho Mangatangi River bridge is next crossed and shortly the Kaiaua Road turns to the left, the Miranda route going ahead. From IvaLaua it is possible to go on another 0110 and a-half miles to the native settlement of Whakatiwai. A road also extends south along tho coast to Miranda and Waitakururu. (56 miles.)

KAWHIA-RAGLAN. . Last season it was rather a tall order to visit both Raglan and Kawhia in one day, but the opening of a new road has brought these favourite west coast resorts within a short run of each other. The best route to Kawhia, via To Awamutu, turns off from the main street about a quarter of a mile from tho Te Awamutu post office. Tho road then skirts around Mount Kakepuka. After 10 miles the Te Kawa route joins and another two miles brings tho tourist to the intersection with the road from Otorohanga. Ifc is a metalled surface, which rises to Ta Rau-a-Moa, and climbs over the hills to Kawhia. Just a few miles before reaching Kawhia an A.A.A. sign indicates the new road which turns to the right and passes through Te Mata before joining tho main Hamilton-Raglan road. Raglan can be visited, and the return to tho city then made by travelling toward Hamilton as far as Whatawhata whcro a turn to tho left is taken on the direct road to Ngaruawahia.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH19280927.2.183.46

Bibliographic details

POPULAR RESORTS., New Zealand Herald, Volume LXV, Issue 20062, 27 September 1928, Supplement

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POPULAR RESORTS. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXV, Issue 20062, 27 September 1928, Supplement

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