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STRAYING FROM PARTY.

TWO REFORM A MEMBERS. MR. HARRIS AND MR." POTTER. NEITHER ATTENDS THE CAUCUS. DIFFERENCES OF OPINION. [BY TFLF.GRAPH. —SPECIAL REPORTER.] WELLINGTON Thursday Two absentees from yesterday's caucus of the Reform Party were Mr. A. Harris (Waitemata) and Mr. V. H. Potter (Roskill). The absence was deliberate., "I have no intention of attending any caucuses of the Reform Party, said Mr. Harris to-day. "I want more freedom of action and L cannot have that if I attend meetings of the party." Mr. Potter was equally definite that he had deliberately stayed away from the caucus, but he did not bind himself as to the future. "I was invited to be present and I told the party leaders that I would not attend," he said. "There exists at present some difference between the Prime Minister and myself, *and until that is removed I intend to stay away from the party caucuses. The causes of the friction that obtains between these members and the party are not hard to find. Mr. Potter is considered to have l infringed party discipline by championing the candidature of Miss Melville in the Eden by-election, when the splitting of the Reform vote between her and Sir James Gunson gave the seat to the Labour candidate, Mr. H. G. R. Mason. In the controversy which surrounded the passing of the Motor Omnibus Act last session Mr. Potter also exhibited a hostile attitude to the Government's proposals, both in and out of the House.

The differences between Mr. Harris and the party leaders were given prominence shortly before Mr. Coates left for the Imperial Conference last year. Mr. Harris also objected to some clauses in the Motor Omnibus Act, and he went so far as to intimate that if his representations were not giver; effect to he would be compelled to consider his allegiance to the party. This announcement brought the retort from the Prime Minister that tlje member, for Waitemata could go home if he liked. He could please himself what he intended to do, but the Government did not want any member in its rarss who would not support its proposals. ...

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH19270701.2.30

Bibliographic details

STRAYING FROM PARTY., New Zealand Herald, Volume LXIV, Issue 19677, 1 July 1927

Word Count
357

STRAYING FROM PARTY. New Zealand Herald, Volume LXIV, Issue 19677, 1 July 1927

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