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SPORTING.

RACING FIXTURES. „ January 7, Rwftoix Jockey Club. . , ' January Waikato Trotting Club. January. 13,'Wairoa County Racing Club. January 14—Rotorua Jockey Club. , January 17—Northern Wairoa Racing Club. January 20, 22, 24—Wellington Racing Club. January 21—Wairio Jocksy Club. January 22, 23—Foxton Racine Club. January 23—OUutati Hack Racing Club. | January Kawakawa Racing Club, J January 29—Pahialua Racing Club. 29, Takapuna Jockey Club. | January Canterbury Jockey Club. February 4, 6—Taranaki Jockey** Club. February 6, Gisbome Racing Club. February 6—Tapanui Racing Club. February 7. Hamilton Racing Club. February 11. 14—Dun«din Jockey Club. February 11, 12—Egroont Racing Club. February 12, 14—Poverty Bay Turf Club. February 14—Te Kuiti Racing Club, , February 18, 19—Woodvill® District Jockey I Club. I February 19, 2ft—North Otago Jockey Club. ! February 20—Opotiki Jockey Club. February Waipa Racing ClubFebruary 21, 25—Otahuhu Trotting Club. February 28, March I—Te Arofca Jockey Club. March 6, B—Ohinemnri Jockey Club. March 17, Thamcb Jockey Club. Match 27—Matamata Racing Club. April 3, s—Auckland Racing Club. June 8, 1, 7— Auckland Racing Club. • DATES OF COMING EVENTS. • January 20Wellington Cnp. January 20—Wellington StakesJanuary 29—Takapuna Cup.

February 7—Hamilton Cup. ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. " Wac«r."— by Carbine, won the Ascot Handicap at the A.R.C. Summer Meeting of 1896-97. " Sport," New Plymouth.—When sold as a yearling, Antagonist walieed 820 guineas. He won the only race for which he started at two years old. " Query," Rotorua.— At three-years-old Advance contested IS races, and he won 10 of his engagements- 2, Vanguard, sine of Advance, was got by Traduoer. " Comedy," Eiloraiie.—According to English time, Comedy King ranked ae * threej year-old when he won the Melbourne Cup, but under the Australian rule he would be regarded as a four-year-old. The question is quite simple. In England the age date for i horses foaled there is January 1, while in ' Australia and New Zealand August 1 is the 1 date. , " Glaxo," Matangi. the Wangsvnui Jockey Club's Winter Meeting, in 1913, Otahu (by Nestor— won the Connolly Handicap, one mile and n-quarter, under fist 10lb. There was a field of ten, I and Otahu won by a head from Piawdena. Particulars with regard to dividends are not published. j "Wager," Hamilton,-1, St. Paul,M)aystar, and Nestor were foaled in the eamo season, and they contested the Great Northern |)crby of 1897, 2. Tasman (tiy St. Al- ' bans—Zillah), who won the first New Zealand Cup, was bred in Tasmania. 3. Nelson was bred in Victoria, and was imported to Auckland when a foal along with his dam. " To Kuiti.'—Tauriki was a chestnut marc, and was described as by St. Crispin from a mare by Freedom. 3ho was produced at the 1 Avondale Jockey Club's Autumn Meeting of 1908, aud won the Maiden Handicap there. ; Subsequently she won a treble at Takapuna, and Tan second to Foremost for th Members' Handicap at Ellerslie. The inquiry which ended in the disqualification of Tauriki was commenced in the same year as she made her appearance on tho Auckland turf under the name given

NOTES BY PHAETON. % . 1 PERMIT EXTENSION AGITATION. The meeting convened by the New Zealand Country Racing Club's Association to consider the question of submitting a Bill to the approaching session of Parliament having for its object the extension of the number of permits to totalisator clubs was largely attended; and the proceedings were marked with such 'unanimity and enthusiasm as to make ii very clear that vigorous steps are to be taken in order to gain the desired end. There can be no doubt that many grievances exist under the regulations at present in force, and these can only bo adequately remedied by an alteration in the law permitting a larger number of days on which the totalisator may be ,used. It is, however, highly nocessary for those who are leading the agitation to be careful to steer a safe course; and to bear the fact in mind that many clubs which at present are denied the u&o ot the totalisator may claim a voice on the question. With the growth of settlement these claims are sure to be put forward ; and justifiably so. In whatever extension of permits is sought it is to be hoped that those clubs which have for years kept the sport going without totalisator aid, and other new bodies with large settlements at their back, will not be overlooked.

THE WELLINGTON CUP. The next race of importance to claim the attention of turfites in the Dominion is the Wellington Cup, which event comes up for decision at Trentham on the 20th inst. Mr. H. Coyle's adjustments made their appearance yesterday, and he has succeeded in casting a good veil of uncertainty round the issue. With Karo engaged, it did not admit of any doubt as to the one that would head the list, but considerable curiosity was evinced as to the standard the Wellington handicapper would decide on in framing his work. In awarding Karo 9st 71b Mr. Coyle has called oil the Auckland Cup winner to carry 101b over weight-for-age, so that she has received her full deserts. Vagabond (Bst 111b) has an impost 31b in excess of that which he carried to victory in the A.R.C. Handicap, and that leaves him with a good chance. Snub (8?l 6!b) cannot be left out of calculations, and neither <an Mascot (Bst 21b). If Affectation (7st 91b) could be landed at the post quite himself he would have a

j chance, but failing the bay colt Mr. A. McDonald may have a very fitting 'substitute in Rose Wreath (7pt. 4'b). The Kilhroney filly stood the racing at. Ellerslie satisfactorily, and she may be equal to registering a very smart mile and a-half at Trentham with an impost 71h under I weight for age. i

s | AUSTRALIAN - BRED YOUNGSTERS. ] It ha.s often hpen remarked since the 0 dispersal of Auckland studs took place { that purchases of yearlings in Australia to be subsequently offered under the ham--1 mer here would prove a profitable spocn--1 lation, providing that only moderate

prices wore involved. I have looked up P the prices paid in Sydney by Mr. (,». T. Niotol for the nine youngsters h» sent up 0 for sale in Auckland last, mouth; and though the cost of transhipment and in- * suranre. together with the outlay for '' their keep and attention for some nine • months would run into a< tidy sum, the - Auckland sportsman did not fare altogether badly. The following are the • figure# : - o • Benight flold in ! in Autk- ; Sydney, land. r ■ CrtU>. Oriß. s Coll by Flippant—Liner# ... 80 :)50 e Colt by Charlemagne ll.— Femina Plume - - 60 100 r Coll by CWleroaen® II — Lightheart ... ... ••• 120 -«0 F Colt by r.uupowder—P»ropero 40 310 u>lt by I'rjdtnt KinsLimaeo' • • • • • • * 400 Filly by Maltster— Dove. . 110 275 Killy by Flippant-Glisß&s - 7» 100 Filly by Varco—Lady Louvray 30 ©■» e l!y by Piedmont-Nell wynne ••• ••• 6l> " 'J 630 1,890

/ ' Autumn prospects.;'-; , : Nominations for the Newmarket Handicap, Australian Cup, Donc&ster, Handicap and'' Sydney; Cup ' closed ' yesterday, and that is a reminder / that , autumn events will soon come up for consider* tiqn in a pointed manner. The Sydney writer, *'Cardigan," has 'an interesting reference in his notes to the reappearance of the champions, from which 1 clip the following:—Poitrel returned to the tracks at Randwick during , the week, and has commenced his preparation for autumn engagements. He looks ' particularly bright and very burly ana the chances are H. J. Robinson considered it wise not to let him get too ouch above himself. I don't suppose any plans have been made for Poitrel _ yet_ awhile, but it would not be surprising .if he is forward >mough, to see him ill Melbourne for the Australian Cup meeting in March. Artilleryman is moving along at ii'iemington. He has never been actually out of work, as his trainer, P. T. Heywood, considers it is advisable; not to let him get gross, as he may not stand the amount of racing necessary to brinjj him back to his best. .Richmond Main s injury, it is said, will not affect his galloping abilities, and he will probably be back on the tracks shortly, est court, the Melbourne Cup winner of 1917, is doing slow work, and, like Poitrel, he looks very big. If this fellow stands another preparation, and it seems too much to expect, he will add considerable interest to the weight-far-age races in the autumn, as what with Poitrel, Artilleryman, Richmond Main, Westcourt and possibly Gloaming, in addition to several others that may develop ere the time, the weight-for-age races ore going to bo particularly interesting, and incidentally hard to win.

I A GREAT JOCKEY. The Australian jockey, Frank Bullock, who recently left Melbourne en route to England, was made the subject of much laudatory writing mi his departure. This is well deserved, for he has proved himself a leading light in his profession. In referring to Bullock s departure '• Winning Post," in the MeiCcnrno Weekly Times, writes: Bullock has entered into a contract to ride for a lead- | ing English stable for a year, but the chances are that he will not return . to Australia for a couple of year?. Bullock is almost as well known in England _ as ho is in Australia. He visited that I country in 1901; Though he quickly won a race he did not have a great deal of success in the first few months. How - ever, lie was able to earn £12 a week for losing mounts. Late in 1904 he began to do better, and by the end vi the year he was well established. In 1905 he returned to Australia, arriving on tho eve of the Victorian Spring Carnival. In a few weeks he won the Melbourne Cup on Blue Spec. Receiving another offer, Bullock returned to England in 1907, and the next year he contracted to ride for the German Imperial Stud. He was under contract to receive £750 the first year. The upshot of that was that he was re-engaged as first jockey to the Imperial stable for six years. In his ' first two seasons lie received £750 a year. The third year this was increased to £2000, and it remained the samo for the fourth year. For Midi of the last two years his retainer was £2500. On the top of these sums ho received £5 for each winning mount, and £2 10s for a losing mount. Bullock just got out of Germany as war broke out. He has also made very largo sums Hi England, and he has won for the rung.

" MY KINGDOM FOR A HORSE." Mr. William Allison, well-known as the Special Commissioner on the Londou Sportsman, has some interesting paragraphs relating to Australians in his recent book, " Aty Kingdom for a Horse." He tells how he purchased Merman for England. He received arable from the Into .Mr. W. R. Wilson, which said:

" Merman won Williamstown Cup. Best horse in Australia to win long distance handicap in England. Legs l'ke steel, 1600gns.' Soon after Mrs. Langtry walked into his office in Pall Mall and said she wanted to buy a horso (bat would win her a good raco. He said he could not for the moment think of one in England, but would buy her a Cesarewitch winner in Australia if she liked. Mrs. Langtry was a courageous lady, and on being shown tho cable and being assured by Mr. Allison til ft the sender was a man oil whom you could lay your life, agreed without hesitation to the purchase, and Merman did win the Cesarewitch in 1897, the year of hi« arrival, besides many and greater races afterwards.

LEAVER FROM MY NOTEBOOK. The Australian-bred hurdler Explorer, who was engaged in carrying Mr. \V. R. Kemball's colours, made a poor show in the three races he contested at the A.R.C. summer meeting and he failed to complete the course in his llr.al engagement. Explorer is a good-locking gelding, and ono that can boast of some ,-aro blood in his veins, for ho was got by Kenilworth (son of Childwick) from I'ilga, who traces to the same dam as Carbine, her dam being Mersey's Daughter, who was got by Trenton from Mersey. * According to one account of tho Fitzherbert Handicap won by the Englishbred horse Arrowsmith at the Manawatu Handicap, he was at one time leading the field bv 20 lengths. Arrowsmith figures ill the "Telegraph Handicap (six furlongs) set down for decision at Ttentham on the 20th inst., and as Mr. Coyle has let hun off with Bst 91b • the man who invested £3000 in his purchase mav have the satisfaction of reaping an early return for the big outlay he made in the purchase of the English horse recently. It is understood that the sum paid for the two-year-old filly Tessares ran to four figures. The filly in question figures amongst the entrants for the Great Northern Champagne Stakes of £1000, which event is set down for decision at Ellerslie in Aprilf so that the daughter of Demosthenes and Gold Thread may be nicely placed to make a substantial return to her Auckland owner at a comparatively early date.

Hymettifs claimed a couple of good winners over a mile and a-quarter during the racing carnival last week. At the Hawke's Bay meeting his descendant Bagdad won the President's Handicap of £300 in 2m 6 l-6s, and at the Wairarapa meeting Daytime won the Cup decided there m <irn 6£s At tho sale of the Blairlogic Stud in March last, Mr. J. Gaddes, of Morrnisville, bought Hymettus cheaply for 275gn:i, and the son of Cyllene should certainly prove a good speculation to the Waikato breeder.

Biplane, who was thrown out of work after his efforts in the early spring, is again included amongst the hoi%es in training at Randwick, and he is to be given an opportunity at the A.J.C. Autumn Meeting to earn some of tho £2500 which he cost Mr. T. A. Stirton when the Sydney sportsman effected his purchase front Mr. G. D. Greenwood some 12 months back.

Wedge, at whose hands New Zealand's champion mare Desert Gold met defeat in tho Caultield Futurity Stakes in the autumn of 1918, is still to be accounted great over a seven furlongs' course. In the decision of the Malvern Handicap at Caulfield on Boxing Day, Wedge carried 9.12 and was only beaten half-a-head by Frais (8.12), in lm 2656. Kenilford, the five-year t old son of KeniJworth and Blueford, for whom Sir Samuel Hordern gave £3000 last spring, has not yet succeeded in winning a race for his new owner. In the decision of the Summer Cup on Boxing Day, Kenilford (7.12) came home third to Pah King (8.6) and East Court (7.9) and on New Year's Day, in the settlement of Tattersall's Cup, under 8.1, he managed to get up into second place to Panacro (9.1).

Feramorz (by St. Frusquin—Musa), who I in at the stud in the Hawke's Bay district, ' and has yet to give the turf a performer of | real note, was responsible for a double ' winner at the Hawke's Bay Summer Meet- ( ing, when his two-year-old son Handy won the two juvenile events decided at Hastings. The West Australian Turf Club committee has decided that from January 24 next any jockey who, in tho opinion of the stipendiary stewards, is riding too " short' must lengthen his stirrups. I

X>-pll . ... H v I *! . s'frf .. ■»' Surveyor is credited ■ with carrying his 9st 91b to victory in the New Year Handicap decided at Hastings last week in a very workmanlike manner, and he got over the 64 furlongs in lift 194-ss. This performance clearly points to the son of Nassau being right back to form, and that he will be on the scene at the forthcoming Wellington meeting is to be exacted.

The 'two-year-old Tetratema . (The Tetrarch—Scotch Gift) to the principal stake-winner during the recently-closed English season. The. five races credited him carried a total of 1510,951. .The Derby winner, Grand Parade, was next with £8268 for two wins. Grand Parade has finished racing, and is advertised for stud duty during the coming season at a fee of £400.

The New South Wales Government anticipates a revenue of £200,000 from the totalisator for the financial year ending June, 1920, against about £132,000 in 1919. The New South Wales country clubs now receive 5 per cent, from the machine instead of 3 per cent, in the previous year.

In referring to Karo's Auckland Cup victory, "Pilot, of the Sydney Referee, remarked : When she won tho Squatters' Handicap at the A.J.C. Spring meeting in October last Kara finished like a stayer, and, though subsequently offered at auction, it is doubtful whether Mr. Greenwood was really anxious she should bo sold. Her trainer, R. J. Mason, certainly was not. The Auckland gelding''British Arch was amongst the contestants for the A.J.C. Summer Cup, run at Randwick on Boxing Day, but he failed to gain a situation under 7st 101b.

'Hie Waikato Trotting Club will hold thoir annual race meeting on Saturday' next, and the acceptances received for tho various events augur well for an interesting afternoon's sport.

The Takapuna Jockey Club give £5350 for competition at their approaching summer meeting, and with the Takapuna Cup worth £1000, tho North Shore Club is now ranged up with those bodies claiming a four-figure event.

The bleeding trouble which came against Mullingar some time back unfortunately still affects the bay horse, and after contesting the Goodwood Handicap on the concluding day of the A.R.C. Summer Meeting, the scarlet fluid was prominent on his nose.

Though the Elysian gelding Entente Cordiale was well beaten in each of Ur three hurdle races ho contested at the A.R.C. Summer Meeting, he gave some evidence of improvement, and he can, I think, he ticked off with thoso horses on the upgrade.

The particular sire whoso descendants are now upholding the Carbine fame is Pistol, the English-bred son of the famous Musket horse, and on Boxing Day Alacrity, a six-year-old daughter of his, carried" 9st to victory in the Port Adelaide Cup.

Panacre, who won Tattersall's Cup at Randwick on New Year's Day, under 9st lib, is one of tlu. veterans of the race track ill New So'jth Wales. He was got by Linacre, from Panara. Guanaco, who won a double at the Hawke's Bay Mev'.ing, is a five-year-old son of Formative and Lady Atholme. The new own«r of Arrowsmith is stated to tie Mr. H. W. Browij, the owner of Kilrush, Loyal Arch, and others. The Australian colt Canowindra ran a decent rare in the Great Northern Derby, and he may see a better day before long. There is stated to bo a prospect of R. J. Mason making a trip to Australia with Gloaming in the autumn. This year's Liverpool Grand National Steeplechase will carry £5000 money.

STUD NOTES. THE TETRARCH AND ST. SIMON. In view of I'm* meteoric success of The] Tetrarch as » Hire, the following from the Special ,l 'inniisflioner'g notes in the London Sportsman will be read with interest: This season in the Old Country three grey colts in Sarchedon (from Perfect Peach), Tetratema (from Scotch Gift), aud Tetrameter (from Mandola) have been

advertising The Tetrarch to such a degree that he is now looked upon as a sire likely to change the colour-line entirely on English courses. This is what the Special Commissioner says:—" It may be that in The Tetrarch wo have a horse destined to effect an influence on bloodstock similar to that effected by St. Simon. It is true '.hat Hie Tetrarch's first year at tho stud will not compare for a moment with St. Simon's, but the second year seems likely to bring him ou terms of equality, and it should bo remembered that St. Simon did not make his first stud season until after a year's interval from being taken out of training. In other words, he was a year older than was The Tetrarch when he began. In fact, The Tetrarch 'n his second season was the tame age is was St. Simon in his first, and therefore tho present two-year-olds by The Tetrarch come into reasonable comparison with the first St. Simons. The latter included St. Serf, Memoir, Signorina, and Semolina—names to conjure by and famous for all time; but who shall say that Tet.ratema, Tetrameter, and Sarchedon will not in time to come be equally famous ? One can only surmise as yet, but such a contingency cannot be described as unlikely. Moreover, Roi Herode, in reference to The Tetrarch, has a states very similar to that of Galopin and St. Simon. In both cases the old horse became slightly overshadowed by the extraordinary success of his son, and there was not the uniformity of success in the careers of the old ones as of the sons, but Galopin was a very great sire indeed, second only to St. Sirnon in merit. Even when ho was quite old he headed the list of winning stallions for a season, and such sons of his as Donovan and Galliard were enough for fame, even if there had been no St. Simon. Moreover, mares by him have proved invaluable matrons, and it is needless to do more on this point than mention the name of Galicia, dam of Bayardo, Leinberg, and Silesia (dam of My Dear). Roi Herode has proved to demonstration again and again that ho does not depend on 'Die Tetrarch alono for his claim to be ranked as a great stallion, and his general influence in the future may be not less than that of Galopin. It is quite safe to say that grey will be a very frequent colour in times to come, and the character of the British thoroughbred will he very considerably altered."

By winning the Auckland Cup and Summer Cup, Karo can aptly bo described as the hercino of the summer season. She was bred by the late Mr. G. P. Donnellv; and she pawed into the hands of Mr. G. D. Greenwood 12 months back, the Canterbury sportsman buying her for 1200gns. The Wowing are the leading lines in the pt'<li>,'reo of the dual Cup winner: — KARO. Sire: IVmoathenefl, by Desmond 'aim of St. Simon) from Carlin, by Ohittabob mon of Robert the Devil) from Lauretta, by Petrarch (son of Lord Clifden) from Anibuscada. by Camcrino, by Stockwell 'son of The Baron). Dam. Kautuku, by Gold Beef (son of Bend Or) from Coino, by Vasco di fiama ffon of Bandsman) from Virginia Water. by Traduc-er Iboii of The Libel) from Wave, by Mnlton ison of Rifleman).

An interesting feature in the pedigree of Karo iB that she traces to the same mare (Spray) as Templeton, who won the first Auckland Cup in 1874.

Bargains in stallions are to he obtained at. nearly every sale of' blood stock in Auckland. General Latour, who can be referred to as an attractive son of Soult, was knocked down at auction last week at Epsom for 21 guineas. '* Tho General " was well served on the score of condition, and as he is only eleven years old. his new owner, Mr. D. McDuff, of Bombay, should find the bay horse a. profitable speculation.

FORTHCOMING MEETINGS. I TAKAPUNA JOCKEY CLUB. ' | Nominations for all events to be run at i the Takapuna Jockey Club's Summer I Meeting close on Friday neat at five p.m., RQTORUA JOCKEY CLUB. Acceptances in connection with the ' Rotorua Jockey Club's meeting close oft Friday next at five p.m., and these may be lodged either with the secretary, Jlr. » K. J. Rennie, Rotorua, or with Mr. H. |H. Hayr, Auckland.

_ NOTES, FROM ELLERSLIE. ■> / It transpires that Mr, P. Keith, who took Mistress Biddy across to Sydney a few weeks ago, is to take' charge of Crenides, Keith, who was well-known

as»a trainer in the Dominion some years ago, arrived .by the Maheno on Sunday

to take charge of the Great, Northern Guineas winner, who may be raced in Australia before being sent further afield to India.

Most of the visiting; horses ah the Auckland Cup meeting were despatched south by special train leaving Ellerslie on Monlay morning.

With the exception of Mangamahoe, R. J. Hannon's competitors at Ellerslie were entrained back to Cambridge last weekend. Mangamahoe was missing from the paddock on Saturday morning, but alter a search was discovered in the Onelumga district on Sunday, nolle the worse lor his experience. He was taken home in charge vl H, Robinson yesterday.

B. Deejey has fully recovered from the mishap which befel him when Red Ribbon fell with him during the running of the Grandstand Handicap on Friday last.

Simonides had earned quite a name for himself as a place-getter in handicap events until Friday last at Ellerrlie, when he broke a long run in handicap events by failing to earn place-money. At the starting post for last Friday's engagement tne son of Demosthenes gave a taste of his earlier fractious habits, and when

the tapes flew up he was giving the leaders an almost impossible start. He was finishing on well when too late.

Multive is to be sent back to Gisborne, but the other membertfof C. Morse's team, Over There and Gazique, will remain to compete at the Takapuna Cap meeting. Over There who is a four-year-old fullbrother to Gazique, is expected to prove a profitable proposition later on. He is a rather hardy-looking chestnut.

W hen Motuihi won the Salisbury Welter Mile at Ellerslie on Summer Cup day ho did so in such attracive fashion as to

augur well for his future career on tho racecourse. He cut the eight furlongs out in lm 40 l-5s with Bst 91b on his back, and loomed up in the straight like a good one. This son of Martian and Intelligence should certainly do a lot better fo- the Messrs. Riddiford, who own him.

Queen Abbey, who won the Newmarket H-indicap at Ellerslie on New Year's Day lro.i. ! ' -itiya, Gazique, Taiamai, Hymestra, and others of note, ig generally considered very well placed at Rotorua next Wednesday, and the daughter of Quin Abbey will only need' to bo a, starter at the thermal region fixture to command spirited support. Tho best was probably not seen of Miss Mimic at the Ellerslie meeting. When the daughter of Sanquhar and Counterfeit finished second to Silver Link in the five furlong Electric Handicap on Summer Cup Day the gave evidence that there was some reason lor the boom which preceded her from the South, and it will come as 110 surprise fr. find her making good later on as a springer. 9 Taiamai, who accounted for the sprint event on the final day at Ellerslie, was evidently in want of rr in" at the commencement of the carnival, for in her first engagement at the fixture on Summer Cup Day she failed to show up in the Electric Handicap won by Silver Link. She was fourth to Queen Abbey, Tigritiya, and Gazique in the Newmarket Handicap -her next start—and with that trio missing 011 the final day the daughter of The Nut duly won the stake for handicap sprinters. Though King Lupin gave evidence during the recent summer carnival at Ellerslie that ho can still muster up a good dash of pace, it was plain ho has lost his former brilliancy. He was pitted against some of the best of our handicap sprinters and middle-distance performers in his engagements, which fact it may be well to remember if the son of Lupin happens to be engaged at some of the less important fixtures m the neai* future. There is a tendency in some quarters to consider Te Oro's prospects in a very favourable light. It has to be admitted that the son of Wauchope was nothing like thoroughly strung up at the Ellerslie meeting, and if he can stand a solid preparation he gives promise of capturing some of the most important handicaps in the land.

Mr. V. Casey was a passenger from Sydney by tho Maheno on Sunday last. He is at present engaged on a bowling tour in the South. In conversation with the sportsman named, I learned that the ex-Auckland performer Te Miro is now an inmate of T. Williams' stable, and is expected to carry the colours of the Casey Brothers in the near future on the other side. Several inquiries have been made regarding the Demosthenes mare Demoiselle of late, but her owner states emphatically that she is not for sale. All Talk, who is in the eale list, was made the subject of inquiry recently by a sportsman acting on behalf of an Australian buyer, but the figure asked for the eon of All Black was considered too high to lead to business. All Talk should pay his way well over hurdles if put to tha test, for he has shown aptitude for the game in schooling tasks at Ellerslie. Octoplete and Kip Kop were a pair of hacks figuring in the Grey Handicap at Ellerslie who were nibble 3 at on the machine, but both ran below their private reputations for speed, and will want racing.

The Te Aroha hacks, Woody Glen and Tamaioa, paid their way handsomely on the southern holiday trip, and their connections will have 110 regrets on the decision to compete at Awapuni and Tauherenikau in preference to Ellerslie. The failures of Finkop and Fabriquett« at Marton last week proved expensive to local ports men, though had Salvaless won on opening day a good deal of money would have changed hands. It is said a large commission was worked' in favour of Surveyor when that horse won at "Hastings on New Year's Day. ltockfield may be termed one of the unfortunate performers at the AucUaiid Cup ( fixture, for when he went under by a head to Escaped in the Glasgow Han. lie;. on j Derby Day the seven furlongs wore traversed in lm 27 while be tilled the role ot runner-up to Te Oro when that horse carved the mile out in the Goodwood Handicap in lm 395. Those performances augur well for Rocktield's career at future country fixtures. | .Miss Leslie disappointed her party badly when she failed to return a dividend . 111 the Grey Handicap. Her most sanguine admirers tully expected her to mate a j runaway race of the event from barrier rise, but, the daughter of Ely si an failed to! display her brillianoe, and never looked | like a winner. The victory credited to Messrs. M. .1 I and D. J. Lynch by the aid of CJonmel in j the Grey Handicap at Ellendie was long j overdue," and well received, for the sport.-, i men mentioned have not experienced the best of fortune in their racing ventures | for some time. Clonmel si ould have no : difficulty working his way out of ha* ; company. j Negligee, a member of the " Higbden " i team at Awapuni, who will be remem- j bered as a competitor in two-year-old en- j gagements at Eller&lie last season, Mas| recently purchased by P. Keith, who take* : Crenides and his most recent purchase . arrow to Australia during the week. ' When 2000 guineas was reported to have | been refused for Uncle Ned in the spring, j it seemed a handsome figure to be cast aside for the son of Marble Arch, who was well up in the handicaps, but it is worthy of mention that Mrs. Lindsay s gel din* has already won £1100 in placo money this season without capturing a race 'outright. The connections of the Avondale gelding were distinctly unfortpunate meeting a candidate of Karo'3 ability in the Auckland Cup, for it is generally agreed Uncle Ned, in th a samo form as he was last Boxing Day, would have won at least eight out of every ten Auckland Cups. In Tessarea and the Charlemagne 11. renresantative purchased at the recent Epsom stud sales, A. Asprey's stably is slightly compensated for the loi-s of Arrowsmith. The pair mentioned are in the right hands to pay their way if they prove as good as they promise to be.

The boom regarding Bitholia seems to have buret somewhat, as he failed to gam place money durin<* the Ellerslie carnival. The 6on of Demosthenes would have required to have run up to his very best reputation to have headed off the opposition in his last two engagements wl cn the seven furlongs and mile events were won in lm 27 s and lm 39s respectively.

There has been a distinct desire to support Arrow-smith for the open sprint event at Wellington since the appearance of the weights. The Trentha.ni six furlongs track should be in favour of the Englishbred horse if his owner seriously intends his recent pirchaee as a starter.

In conversation recently with Mr. J. He&top, late owner of Arrowsmith, I gleaned the local sportsman has no great desire to import any further English thoroughbreds to the Dominion for racing purposes, even thdftgh he may be referred to as having made two particularly (rood deals with Polydamon and Arrowsmith. In fact, Mr. Heelop stated that he was irivinir orders to two different sportsmen at Hoino who were acting for him not to continue their look-out for a suitable thoroughbred. '

The Trafalgar chestnut Lord Pilgrim, who was being prepared for a racing career by W. Smith, had to be destroyed recently. It is said the gelding was eufferine from tetanus.

Mary Bruce cleared hurdles satisfactorily in a schooling task yesterday, while Slowcoach pave a very moderate exhibition.

J. Lambe6s has taken charge of the Boniform—Northern Rose filly purchased by Mr. A. Gibbons at the recent sales. The same trainer has a Marble Arch—Red Pine gelding under his care, while Kauri King is being fed preparatory to being placed in work again.

Killard will probably be blistered and turned out for a spell in the paddock. He has been a most disappointing performer since winning the Te Aroha Cup last autumn.

Only four of the 32 races decided at the recent Auckland Cup fixture went to Ellerslie trained horsesj though 13 events were won by horses owned in the Auckland Province.

Mr. A. Jones, the well-known sporting photographer, has joined the staff of the Weekly Press as a North Island photographio representative. TWO-YEAR-OLDS AT ELLERSLIE. A REVIEW OF TffE FORM. Br phaeton.

j I Eulogiums passed on the two-year-old J division that competed at Riccarton in • the spring seemed to point to Humbug, 3 Moor low 1, and Right and Left being 1 j something much above the ordinary. The • j two former each scored victories at the ' ! recent summer meeting held at Ellerslie> p | but it was left for the Royal Stakes on s 1 the concluding day to demonstrate that I they are just good in their own class. 3 | That they should all strike their colours r | to Gloaming occasions no great surprise, I for The Welkin gelding comes within tho II category of the great; but Silver' Link 5 1 having also routed them in a decisive _: manner such seems to dim the character r j of their previous form. r! Humbug, won the Great Northern Foal 3 ' Stakes in an attractive manner; and _ ' those who had voted Moorfowl the best i of the juveniles had to undergo a large , I amount of badinage. The second race . | saw Moorfowl home in front of her } 1 chestnut rival, but she had 101b the best } of the weights; and the final test at Ellerslie under equal conditions gave Humbug the lead. Humbug is a ' fine upstanding colt that age may "' be expected to do a lot for; I 1 and if, as I learn, Mr. E. S. Williams 1 ' intends giving the Bon of Absurd a rest 1 : until the autumn rolls round, that should * . be greatly to the benefit of the blazed--3 - faced chestnut, for he was trained to race 1 ' in October. ! I Moorfowl can be described as a really 5 1 nice filly; and that she can pick up ner feet very quickly she gave proof at s Ellerslie. In the decision of the Great f Northern Foal Stakes she showed fine 1 1 dash for over five furlongs; but the ttnaJ ? j stage found her in distress. On New J j Year's Day fthe met Humbug at a differ- - I ence of 101b in the Midsummer Handi- [ ' cap and beat him easily, but she ' ; fared better at the start than | her rival; and in addition I formed

the opinion that she stood her race on the opening day better than the chestnut colt. The daughter of Autumnus and Kirriemuir may be expected to make a reappearance early, and it will be interi est ing to note whether her performance is such as to discount her concluding display at Ellerslie. Right and Left captured a good number of admirers by the bid he made for victory in th Foil Stakes in the face of difficulties; and quite a number of keen heads selected him as the likely one to give Gloaming a race in the Koyal Stakes, in which he had a 71b maiden allowance. The son of Merry Moment got off nicely in the last race; but though he was doing his best below tie dihuince he failed to reach the leaden:. He finished quite straightly under punishment, but his effort was decidedly disappointing, far no r excuse ixrald bo urged for him on - the score of want of condition. There is a great deal to enthuse over in the physique of Right and Left, for he is I well-balanced all over, and there is a deal I of the racehorse look about him. Right and ' Left's collapse in the Royal Stakes may cause some to conclude that Mr. G. L. Stead had the worst of the deal when he bought the brown son of Merry Moment and En Parole at £51750; but it is quite too early vet to form any such opinion. Right and Left is a promising-looking colt, and when autumn events come to be decided he may be found playing his part impressively. i Weldone (by The Welkin — Rose) won his two races at Ellerslie in. decent stvle, and he carries the look of one that ■ mil more than pay to vay as he ages. Lucullan was only seen out once at the ! meeting» and then it was a pronounced defeat that went down against him. The son of Lucullus earned an improved appearance when lie contested the Foal Stakes; and there was somo reason to ' , anticipate a good performance. Possibly . the ailment, which led to the bay colt l being sent out of commission „after his j effort on Boxing Day may have affected his prospects in the Foal Stakes; and it ' mav not be quite safe to accept his un- ' placed performance in that r;xe as air-

1 i rect - • . ~ 11 Dunedin cut up badly in bvth his I races; and with a view to his future it ! would, I think, have been just as well hat. he not been asked for efforts in the J summer. Cot by Linacre from Royal j Silver a daughter of Royal Artillery, f rom a mare by Grafton, Duncdrn has «onething jKfwerful to recommend him on SS lines; and it wdl be pleasing breeding hues; <" <1 it ™ tleeson to Unci him rewarding Mr. J. G. Gleeso ° when the autumn engagement* come to ! bo faced. I KAWAKAWA RACING CLUR. I % s'b VtSSSI Pl«» j at Darsim'lo on January I MAIDEN HANDICAP. - Soliloquy, SalLdan Zimml*. Hypothesis, Miss Winning. iMasler Harold, Mollyroon, North Loburn, I S -d Masterful. Gleam. Sine Die, Tamanaka, ! Wanna, Lady Winnie, Portman, Alys, Mar- ! sheen, Tom Moore Thyme, Killott.

! FLYING HANDICAP.—Peria, Kilbeggan, | Solitude, Glad Tidings, Homeric, Winning Lass General Joffre, Araluen, Lord Masterful. kirnwinning. Pretty Ethel, Royal Mark. ! KAWAKAWA CUP.—Scottish Knight. Rome. Vladinoy, Battletide, General ! Stephen, Lombardy, Glucian, Er&lf. Mwj I Bnice, Archery, Tom Moore, Royal Irish. I PUBLICANS' PURSE.—Zimniie, Rome, | Normanby, Kil'seggan, Solittido, Glad Tidings, Homeric, Mollyroon, Merry Nell, Portman, Thyme, Araluen. , COUNT"? HANDICAP.— Peria, Master Harold, Homeric, Welshman, Gleam, Sine Die, Coroner, Araluen, Eralf, Waima, Paiaku, Kirriwincins, Archery, St. Amicl, Marsheen, Thymt, Killott. RAILWAY HANDICAP.—Scottish Knight, , Vladii.oy, Hypothesis, Lombardy, Merry Nell, General Joifre, Araluen, Mary Bruce, Tom Moore. SHORTS HANDICAP—Zimmie, Silboggaii, Mavourneen, Miss Winning, Solitudo, Glad Tidings. Hippocap, Homerio, Solilo-jue, Winning Lass, Lord Masterful, 1 Araluen. Alys. Pretty Ethel, Royal Mark. ; FAREWELL WELTER HANDICAP.- : Salvadan, Scottish Knight, Rome, Battletide, i Normanby. General Stephen. Hypothesis, p Master Harold. Lombardy, North Loburn, General Jofire, Glucian, Eralf, Paiaku, Kirriwinmug, Archery. Gleam, Killott,

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Bibliographic details

SPORTING., New Zealand Herald, Volume LVII, Issue 17361, 7 January 1920

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6,741

SPORTING. New Zealand Herald, Volume LVII, Issue 17361, 7 January 1920

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