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DRIED MILK INDUSTRY.

MATANGI FACTORY OPENED.

SPEECH BY MR. MASSEY.

MORE PRODUCTION NEEDED.

U»X TELBGBAPH. —OWN

HAMILTON, Wednesday

The new glaxo factory at Matangi was officially opened by the Prime Minister, Mr. W. F. Massey, tq-day. Though the weather was showery there was a large attendance from all part* of the Waikato. including Messrs. R. F. Bollard and J. A. Young, M.P.'s, P. H. Watts, Mayor of Hamilton, and G. Parr, president of the Hamilton Chamber of Commerce.

Mr. L. Bryant, of Matangi, who presided, briefly welcomed the Prime Minister. He said they were proud of their factory, and mentioned that they were receiving 16,000 gallons of milk per day now, and when fully equipped they would receive 25,000 gallons. He called for cheers for Mr. Massey, which were heartily given. . Mr. Massey thanked thc«e present for the hearty welcome they had given him. and said the*settlers were to be congratulated on having such an industry in their midst. He -was told the factory was the largest in the world, which was conclusive proof that the settlers had confidence in themselves, in their district, and in the future of the industry. He had seen a good deal of dried milk on the other sido of the world, and he predicted that in the future milkmen would not deliver milk at the door, but the solid article would be purchased at the grocer's.

Record of Progress. The output of dried milk in New Zealand, when the industry was started in 1916, was 542 tons. The next season it was 2850 tons, last season 3225 tons, and one did not need to be a prophet to* say that this amount would be exceeded this season. The latest American figures were 11,440 tons, so that the output here compared very favourably with America. Continuing, Mr. Massey said there waa one drawback to the dried milk and casein industry, and he hoped the settlers would remember they had a duty to the country. It was right enough getting the best prices for their products, but they could not prosper if the stock was not provided, and he urged them to find some substitute for milk to feed calves.

Productivity of Dominion. The Prime Minister quoted figures showing that since 1911 there had been an increase of over 1,000,000 head of cattle and nearly 2,000,000 sheep, and said this was proof of the extraordinary productiveness of New Zealand. They were dependent for their prosperity upon their exports. They had taken up great liabilities, but it would not have been possible to do so if it had not been for the fact that the industry of the people had improved. However, they wanted more land cultivated and more stock to make the land produce more." There was no fear for the future of the country, and he had seen no land he liked more than that in the Waikato.

No Fear for the Future. The Prime Minister concluded: "Remember that first-class goods command first-class prices. Do your best, produce your best, and this glorious little country will have nothing to fear for the future." (Loud appl&use.) Mr. W. Goodfellow, managing director" of the New Zealand Co-operative Dairy Company, said the suppliers had the satis faction of knowing that they had one of the best factories in the world. The com pany had efficient managers, but with a view to increasing the efficiency of the staff the company was installing an up-to-date laboratory, and lectures would also be given. Sir. Goodfellow said he believed they should place their butter on the openmarket. (Hear, hear.) With that end in view the directors had decided to open a London office and to have a representative to deal with the matter He also referred to the good work done by the architects, Messrs. Daniel and Cray.

The Gospel of Work. Mr. R. F. Bollard, M.F. for Raglan, said that since Mr. Massey had been in power he had had nothing but trials and tribulations, and it was '"up to them" to give him three years ot peace. (Applause.) Mr. J. A. Young, M-P. for Waikato, congratulated the suppliers on having such a fine factory. The war had left them a legacy of problems, but the gospel of work as laid down by Mr. Massey was the true solution of them all- They could not solve them by "going slow." If the country was to do well there must be constant and persistent production. After referring to the good work done at the Ruakura Faring Mr. Young said there was room there for a school of advanced dairy science, which would prove of benefit to the whole Dominion.

Intensive Cultivation. Mr. H. E. Pacey said he was optimistic regarding the future, but he felt there was need not only for more production, but also for better production. They must attend to the quality and increase the quantity. If they did that success was assured. Matangi would do its share.

Referring to the high prices of land, he said they were causing people to go in for intensive cultivation. He mentioned that on one farm last season the gross income from 26 acres was £700. This year the same farmer had 34 acres. He wintered 41 head of cattle, was milking 27 cows, and expected to get 80001b of butter-fat for the season. This at last year's prices meant a gross return of £900. That was the sort of farming that would contribute to the country's prosperity. Mr. T. Daniel briefly returned thanks on behalf of the architects, after which afternoon tea was served. Music was supplied bv the Matangi Band. Subsequently the Minuter inspected the company's homes for its employees.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH19191113.2.99

Bibliographic details

DRIED MILK INDUSTRY., New Zealand Herald, Volume LVI, Issue 17316, 13 November 1919

Word Count
949

DRIED MILK INDUSTRY. New Zealand Herald, Volume LVI, Issue 17316, 13 November 1919

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